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Date/Time: 11/12/2018 11:59PM
Let's talk warm coats

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Previous Messages:
Author Message Text
Jaywalker 01/12/2018 10:52PM
I absolutely love my Wintergreen fleece inner anorak and outer wind proof shell. It's been my go to jacket for my last several winter camping trips and my every day dog walking. Both cover the hips. The inner is 300 fleece, and I love the way it zips up around the neck - I rarely need a scarf. The outer kills the wind, and I added a thick coyote ruff for real cold. Can wear one,the other, or both as needed with activity level.


Also just made a thick boreal shirt that's great but I'm still learning about it. I have a thick puffy Mountain Hardware hooded coat but rarely wear it.
yellowcanoe 01/12/2018 07:07PM
Tomorrow
fraxinus 01/12/2018 04:33PM
Thanks for the wealth of experience in these suggestions. I shouldn't be surprised that layering is a solid solution. Interesting that the old standby, wool, is a favorite. I think I'll start looking at wool anoraks or parkas and and a longer windproof shell. Thanks again, it hit the 50's last week and I almost came up with that old line, cabin doesn't leak when it doesn't rain, who nneds a warm coat now.
TheBrownLeader 01/11/2018 04:35PM
I took the dogs for a walk last week and it was minus 6 the first day, with no wind. I wore my Filson double Mackinaw wool coat, which my wife bought for me for our first anniversary. It's a little tighter on me now, to be sure. At minus 6, no wind, and walking, I had to unbutton the front a few clicks so I didn't start sweating. Even when the wind kicks up, it's plenty warm, but if it's really blowing I go a different route.


The next day it was minus something, but windy. I took the dogs again but I wore a wool sweater, with a polar fleece over that, and a 10-12 year old Army Surplus ECWCS 3 in one Gore-tex shell. The Gore-tex, Fleece, and Wool did the trick. I felt well shielded from the icy gusts, and the natural fibers underneath did the job.


I get all my cold weather jackets in Long, even thought I am only 5'11. It extends comfortably down past my belt line and prevents a lot of heat loss.
ParkerMag 01/11/2018 10:34AM
As useful and effective a piece of outdoor gear as I own. Put an insulating layer or two beneath it, and you're set for the South Pole.
Boreal shirt
keth0601 01/06/2018 07:26AM
fraxinus: "Let’s talk warm coats. Any recommendations as to what woks for you? I’m talking single digit, below zero wind chill conditions, for dog walking, snowshoeing, spending some time outside. This last cold snap has revealed a bit of a hole in my winter jacket collection. I’m thinking something that covers the hips a bit, cinches at the bottom to keep the cold drafts out, isn’t too bulky, is windproof and warm. Does anyone use any of the 3 in 1 type coats, with a waterproof shell, and a zip-out down or synthetic liner? Looks like a nice versatile option, the shell could be used alone for wind/rain protection, I’m just curious as to whether the liner which looks like a light zip up insulated jacket adds enough warmth. - thanks"


This depends a great deal on what exactly you want to do and in what temps. I doubt you'll find any one garment (or even 3) that will fit every type of winter activity you want to do.


I've found that a combination of a soft shell, hard shell (neither is insulated), light and heavy insulating layers (wool or fleece), a down coat, and a heavy wool anorak will fit about everything that I like to do.


For higher output activities like snowshoeing, skiing, climbing, etc I find that the soft shell in combination with an insulating layer (usually the lighter one) will work well for me in a very wide range of winter temps from around freezing to well below zero. When I stop for any extended period the down parka goes on over everything to keep me warm at rest.


For lower output (around camp, hunting, fishing, etc) I tend to use the heavier insulating layer (or both) along with the wool anorak. Same thing goes for when it really cools down- I'll add on the down.


If it's raining or the snow is very wet I'll use the hard shell, but I really hate wearing the hard shell especially for high output activity because none of the waterproof breathables actually breath well no matter what anyone tells you.


That's all just for the torso. This could go on to talk about base layers, legs, head, hands but that would get even longer. :)
bwcasolo 01/06/2018 06:57AM
i have multiple layer garments. they all start with a patagonia merino wool undy shirt. then i have other patagonia, wool, capilene shirts that go over that.
breaking wind is important for me, since i bike year round to work.
i own patagonia down pullovers that go over my under layers when it is above 32.
below 32, i will wear my patagonia r4 fleece jacket, which is wind proof, and very warm, follow with a patagonia wind jacket over that with a hood.
as i said, blocking the wind for me is very important to stay warm.
i have purchased these patagonia garments over the years, they are made well, and serve my purpose very well.


mc2mens 01/05/2018 12:30PM
I have too many coats, but I like to have the right gear for the conditions and activity. And in Minnesota it can get cold - witness the past 2 weeks. When I'm active (hiking, snowshoeing, etc.) and it's cold out, I like to layer, as others have said. My layers start with merino wool long underwear tops and bottoms. My jacket combo includes a Patagonia Nano Air jacket for insulation. It's warm, light and breathable. Over that I wear a REI Stormrealm shell. It's water and wind resistant and breathes too.


If I'm not as active, but it's cold out and I need something warm, my favorite coat is the Montbell Alpine Light down jacket. If it's really cold out, I put on my North Face Mt Elbert coat.
awbrown 01/04/2018 01:32PM
I use layers as well. My everyday winter coat is a Empire Wool and Canvas Camp Coat. It is made from wool blankets, has zippered pockets at the waist and chest, reinforced elbows and a sewn in ring to attach keys, etc. in the waist pockets. It also fits below my butt and has an elastic draw string around the bottom for sealing up your fanny.


It's very warm even in the temperatures we've been experiencing the last couple of weeks. Wool is great because it wicks away moisture from your body and it breathes.


I'll wear a anorak or parka for a wind layer if necessary.


awbrown 01/04/2018 01:32PM
I use layers as well. My everyday winter coat is a Empire Wool and Canvas Camp Coat. It is made from wool blankets, has zippered pockets at the waist and chest, reinforced elbows and a sewn in ring to attach keys, etc. in the waist pockets. It also fits below my butt and has an elastic draw string around the bottom for sealing up your fanny.


It's very warm even in the temperatures we've been experiencing the last couple of weeks. Wool is great because it wicks away moisture from your body and it breathes.

In addition, it has snaps instead of a zipper. Zippers fail at the most worst possible moment.


I'll wear a anorak or parka for a wind layer if necessary.


butthead 01/04/2018 01:22PM
SevenofNine: "Tomster,



Ken spends too much money on gear so how could he ever buy a door? :-)"



Thanks a ton to ya both! Honestly the only stuff in the photo bought new are Hat, Mittens. bh
SevenofNine 01/04/2018 06:54AM
Tomster,


Ken spends too much money on gear so how could he ever buy a door? :-)
quark2222 01/03/2018 06:25PM
butthead: "I do not own an insulated coat. Instead rely on layering to stay comfortable.




Single digit temps when pictured,med weight wool long-johns, heavy wool pants, mukluks, heavy wool sweater, anorak, fleece hood, insulated hat, glove liners and mittens. Warm enough to sit around in, flexible ventilation for hiking activities.



When it's cold I put away the jackets and coats, bring out down or wool sweaters and windbreaker anoraks or full zippered single layer coat. I have 2 Columbia coats that can accept zip in liners, one blaze orange and 1 brown camo similar to current Quad Parka line, but use them like I would an anorak over a sweater (a bit too bulky for my taste), they are longer than the anorak pictured covering more thigh.



butthead"



Wow! You need to save up and buy a door for your house!


Tomster
SevenofNine 01/02/2018 06:59PM
I don’t have any affiliation with LL Bean so I can recommend you take a look at their coats. What I like about their site is they give ratings based on the coat type and the kind of activity you may be doing. So browse and use it as a reference.
boondock 01/02/2018 03:40PM
First Lite has some nice jackets on sale right now in colors/patterns they are no longer selling. The Sanctuary jacket is made for layering and is super warm, I have their Cirrus puffy and SEAK rain jacket that are well made and comfortable.


I also have a couple of thick wool jackets that I like when I want something that breathes a little more.
DanCooke 01/02/2018 02:46PM
For Active cold weather my outer layer will be an extra long large zip up with pit zip goretex jacket, that I have a fur ruff on the hood. Usually just a wool shirt and wool long under wear top. A polar fleece jacket could be added if activity slows. I sized the Goretex jacket to fit over a PFD, the jacket is 17 plus years old.


When stopped I have a down coat (older version of this current model - Outdoor research Diode Hooded Jacket) with integral hood. I can stand around at 30 below with this down coat with no problem.


chopper mitts when it is cold- lightweight poly gloves as temps get to zero and I am working.
several different hats and a neck gaiter complete my clothing.


My winter camping buddies say I run warm.
yellowcanoe 01/02/2018 11:47AM
I have a very unstylish Empire Canvas Arctic Anorak. Its so densely woven cotton that the wind cannot penetrate.
Its thigh length
For walking I wear a fleece under it with a base layer of merino wool
For really harsh conditions I wear the Wool Blanket Shirt under the Anorak


I sweat a lot so I do not wear a single layer bulky coat. Its nice to be able to change without taking the anorak off. ( it kind of turns into a tent). It ventilates well and you can turn off the ventilation by wearing a sash and tightening that

I have tried the 3- in one coats and the weaknesses is in the zipper.. you have two less insulated openings where zippers are involved. I havent seen one with an insulated storm flap

Thank you for your Midwest chill. -30 today with 20 mph winds.
butthead 01/02/2018 11:41AM
I do not own an insulated coat. Instead rely on layering to stay comfortable.



Single digit temps when pictured,med weight wool long-johns, heavy wool pants, mukluks, heavy wool sweater, anorak, fleece hood, insulated hat, glove liners and mittens. Warm enough to sit around in, flexible ventilation for hiking activities.


When it's cold I put away the jackets and coats, bring out down or wool sweaters and windbreaker anoraks or full zippered single layer coat. I have 2 Columbia coats that can accept zip in liners, one blaze orange and 1 brown camo similar to current Quad Parka line, but use them like I would an anorak over a sweater (a bit too bulky for my taste), they are longer than the anorak pictured covering more thigh.


butthead
wingnut 01/02/2018 09:23AM
I use this coat and the bibs that go with it For Ice fishing . Traveling to and from fishing spots on a machine, I'm sure generates some crazy wind chill temps. It amazes me how warm and windproof it is without being bulky.





Arctic armor
bwcadan 01/02/2018 08:19AM
Delivering newspapers even in sub zero conditions, I do not get cold as I layer up to meet the needs of a given night. I do not have own a heavy coat, but do have plenty of good long underwear and fitting tops which get progressive larger depending on the temps and wind chill. Also have an extra in minivan if needed. If I misgauge after all that, I close the windows for a time to warm me up and the interior of the minivan. To keep the papers as warm (fingers and thumb get cold if not frozen) as possible, I cover them up with a blanket until I need the bundles to roll as the night progresses. If the temps are even worse, I have on occasion driven the route going the opposite direction after making the right side throws so as to be able to toss out the right window and leave the left window up for the night. If only a few papers on left, I do not reverse directions, but will open door briefly to toss over the door to sidewalk. Works for me.
cyclones30 01/01/2018 08:53PM
Not meeting your hips requirement but I have an original summit series north face single layer. I'm still amazed how well I can stay comfortable at various temps with it.
SevenofNine 01/01/2018 05:42PM
I have layer system for activities that might bring on a lot of sweat. It starts with a base layer of synthetic long underwear followed by a 300 weight fleece coat with a canvas shell made by Empire Canvas and Wool. I wear a wool balaclava for a hat. Mittens with a shell for my hands. I add or subtract under layers depending on how warm it is outside.


For mild walks going to and fro from the car to work I wear a down parka from Eddie Bauer. It’s quite bulky but very warm.


I’ve had good luck with synthetics like Primalft for keeping me warm but I end up sweating too much so I like fleece or merino wool with a shell for activity sports like cross country skiing or fast walks with the wife.

I don’t like 3 in 1 jackets because the hoods aren’t insulated. They aren’t designed for real cold weather per se. That said you might try one and find it works for you. I find I need breathable clothing for my winter needs in most cases.


Yes, you need to cover your hips and legs. I always hear people say “my legs are never cold” what they might not realize is they are still losing heat through their legs. At least parkas help reduce that loss. So look into a wind shell for your legs when it’s really cold.

Good luck on your search.
fraxinus 01/01/2018 05:30PM
Let’s talk warm coats. Any recommendations as to what woks for you? I’m talking single digit, below zero wind chill conditions, for dog walking, snowshoeing, spending some time outside. This last cold snap has revealed a bit of a hole in my winter jacket collection. I’m thinking something that covers the hips a bit, cinches at the bottom to keep the cold drafts out, isn’t too bulky, is windproof and warm. Does anyone use any of the 3 in 1 type coats, with a waterproof shell, and a zip-out down or synthetic liner? Looks like a nice versatile option, the shell could be used alone for wind/rain protection, I’m just curious as to whether the liner which looks like a light zip up insulated jacket adds enough warmth. - thanks