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doubledown
senior member (58)senior membersenior member
 
08/22/2017 02:55PM
I'm starting to plan next year's trip, and I'm really trying to shed every ounce possible to move quicker than this year. I'd like to leave the landing net at home and hand land. Anyone have a good pair of gloves they'd recommend for landing (and probably filleting)?
 
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ayudell
distinguished member (119)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/22/2017 05:18PM
Check out Boga-type grips. They make some knockoff ones that are pretty reasonable, just make sure you get one that will allow the fish the rotate. The non-rotating ones tear the fish up. They let you unhook the fish without ever needing to bring it into the boat- great for thrashing pike with 3 treble hooks hanging out of their maw. They aren't the lightest solution, but less bulky than a landing net and less dangerous than wrastling fish over the gunwale.

This would be a good one:
https://www.amazon.com/Rapala-227870-Mechanical-Fish-Gripper/dp/B00F5EK4RK/ref=sr_1_42?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1503440607&sr=1-42&keywords=fish+gripper
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(12246)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
08/22/2017 06:51PM
I second the fish grip, I have the plastic fish grip. I would not fish without it from now on. I was in Canada and landed about a hundred Walleye and about 20 pike. It worked great. I would grip the fish in the water and bring into the boat. I then inserted a jaw spreader into the mouth as I still held the fish with the other hand. I then removed the hook with a pliers and removed the jaw spreader and put the fish back into the water. The fish never was on the bottom of the boat, and I never had to touch the fish not that I care. With the fish grip you can also hold and put on the stringer. As far as a glove to clean, get a glove that has Kevlar and stainless steel mesh, sold at Rockler woodworking for carvers. It won't protect you from a stab, but it will protect you from a slice or slip of the knife, about $20.00.

ParkerMag
distinguished member(878)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/23/2017 10:55AM
Keep in mind leaving all that stuff home is an option too.
AmarilloJim
distinguished member(762)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/23/2017 02:21PM
I liked this one
Jackfish
Moderator
 
08/23/2017 03:00PM
quote ParkerMag: "Keep in mind leaving all that stuff home is an option too."
I was going to type something similar, but this pretty much shares my sentiments. No glove or gripper required.
doubledown
senior member (58)senior membersenior member
 
08/23/2017 03:25PM
I appreciate the no extra gear approach as well, but I am planning on targeting big pike and I'm a once-a-month fisherman so my handling skills aren't what some others' may be.

I may just bring the net as I'm guessing it weighs about the same as the grips and I'm trying to tame my inner gear junkie. The grips are compact though...
rpike
member (46)member
 
08/24/2017 02:16PM
+1 on the gripper. So much easier on a portage than a landing net. Way smaller, probably lighter, and no mesh getting tangled. I think the gripper is easier from a canoe than is a net that is big enough to manage a truly big pike.
QueticoMike
distinguished member(3688)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/24/2017 03:29PM
I don't take gloves, grippers, nets or scales any longer on my trips..... still have all of my fingers for now :)
brantlars
distinguished member(506)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/24/2017 06:55PM
Gloves?...you mean bitch mittens? Leave them at home.
rpike
member (46)member
 
08/25/2017 12:00PM
quote QueticoMike: "I don't take gloves, grippers, nets or scales any longer on my trips..... still have all of my fingers for now :)"

That was my M.O. until a smallish trout shook and hooked me. It's the small fish that cause the most problems, IMO. Then again, you haven't really lived until you've been hooked to a thrashing fish!
walleyevision
distinguished member (123)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/25/2017 12:42PM
I tried the gripper last year and hated it. The problem with it is the fish has to have its mouth open or it's absolutely worthless. Pretty tough to get a fish to open its mouth when each jaw is hooked by the same treble hook. Just my two cents.
QueticoMike
distinguished member(3688)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/26/2017 03:36PM
quote rpike: "quote QueticoMike: "I don't take gloves, grippers, nets or scales any longer on my trips..... still have all of my fingers for now :)"


That was my M.O. until a smallish trout shook and hooked me. It's the small fish that cause the most problems, IMO. Then again, you haven't really lived until you've been hooked to a thrashing fish!"


I had a big smallmouth on a Rapala years ago, right when I went to lip it the fish jumped one more time and embedded one of the treble hooks into my finger. My fishing buddy wouldn't help me out until he took a picture of me holding the bass. It was a nice fish, but I really didn't care about having a picture taking during the time. So one set of trebles were in the fish and another in my hand. I will admit it did hurt when the fish was still moving around. I got the fish off and it let it swim free. Then I showed my buddy how to remove a hook using fishing line. The first attempt didn't work, that kind of smarted too. The next yank did the trick. I poured a little vodka over the wound, took a shot of vodka for medicinal purposes and started fishing again. :)

QueticoMike
distinguished member(3688)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/26/2017 03:43PM
quote walleyevision: "I tried the gripper last year and hated it. The problem with it is the fish has to have its mouth open or it's absolutely worthless. Pretty tough to get a fish to open its mouth when each jaw is hooked by the same treble hook. Just my two cents."

That makes sense.....
snakecharmer
distinguished member(6487)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/27/2017 12:38PM
I have one of the orange, Lindy fish landing gloves. It works great! I bought it for my son to use when he was younger and inexperienced with landing toothy critters. And I've lip landed a number of larger pike and walleyes with it during the ice fishing season. I can highly recommend it!
amhacker22
distinguished member(1136)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/27/2017 01:20PM
I've got a cheap orange lip grabber. For me, it's the way to go. Keep them in the water. It's so much easier to handle. I'm fishing again in almost no time if I can get it lipped.
mastertangler
distinguished member(3243)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/05/2017 11:57AM
My experience has shown me that much depends on the tackle your using. Lots easier to be casual handling fish if your using single hook lures like a jig or a bare hook. Also size of the fish caught also plays heavily into the sceanario as well. Try using plastic fish grippers on 40" pike......good luck with that.

So no problem not using any landing device whatsoever with lures like jigs, no problem for the most part especially if you typically target the "eater" variety of fish or smallies which are easily lipped.

But I would dare any of the non equipment users to reach down and try unhooking 40" pike which have engulfed a Shadzilla Swimbait. The entire process is rather filled with trepidation. Two sets of razor sharp 8/0 treble hooks some 4" apart and for good measure another big single J hook topside. All attached to one pissed off toothy torpedo.

I am totally respectful of the potential downside. After subduing the beast the rod is placed into a sturdy (as in mighty sturdy) rod holder and the sparring partner is towed into shallow water where I get out. By this time my adversary is quite a bit calmer and I clamp the boga on then grab some Shimano 9" needle nose pliers to remove the hooks.

The plus side of the Shadzilla is once they clobber the thing they usually never get off. The downside is it is fraught with danger especially for the ill equipped or unprepared.

But it doesn't have to be a lure with big hooks which can get you.......even a smallish original Rapala sporting 3 sets of treble hooks require a great deal of respect and that means tools for the job. BTW......when fish get tired, they are much like people, and their mouths tend to droop open. I never mess with fish, especially pike (even small ones) until their mouths are open, then they are largely out of juice.
rpike
member (46)member
 
09/08/2017 11:00PM
You could make the shadzilla *slightly* less frightening to unhook by cutting the point off the single J hook before you use it. I submit your hooking percentage will not change much, if at all.

I use various big plastics lures for muskies. Bull dawgs and medussas are fairly similar; the bull dawg has a single hook on top like the shadzilla. My hooking percentage is no better with the dawg than with the 'dussa.
mastertangler
distinguished member(3243)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/09/2017 06:12AM
I hear ya Rpike........but it's those free swinging big treble hooks which get my attention. I am considering removing the belly treble on the Shadzillas. But as long as I can get out and deal with the big ones in shallow water with a boga and 9" pliers it's no problem. Plus they sit comfortably in the shallows while I set the timer on the camera.

I tried a variety of other big swimbaits this past August but the Shadzillas ruled both in strikes and keeping connected.
ockycamper
distinguished member (383)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/10/2017 04:01PM
" I'd like to leave the landing net at home and hand land. "

If you are going to shed the pounds. . . leave the pole at home and catch em with your hands and feet. . . we call that "noodling" in KY.
 
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