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RiverRatz
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08/26/2017 12:02PM
When portaging do you normally move the canoe first to get it out of the way of arriving groups or does it matter? First trip, we've got 3-4 short portages - Thanks
 
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Sven83
member (33)member
 
08/26/2017 12:16PM
I prefer to take the canoe first, set packs off to the side. Then put one end of the canoe in the water on the put in. Then you can load packs in as they come across the portage, as to handle them as few times as possible.

Keep in mind that leaving the canoe partially in the water is risky unless you have it tied to something or have a pack to put in it right away. If it's windy it could potentially drift away from shore.
shock
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08/26/2017 12:48PM
i prefer to portage the canoe first , then with the packs your able to lay them right in the canoe , when you know your gear is balance keep loading the same way, nothing worse than an off balanced load .
08/26/2017 12:55PM
I usually take the canoe first, but whatever you do you should put the canoe or packs (2nd load) off to the side of the landing out of others' way when double portaging. The same applies when you get to the other end - don't block the portage landing while you go back for the second load, especially on a long portage that will take you considerable time to go back and then across again. On a 1-mile portage that's 2 miles of walking. That would be a long time to leave one blocked. Portages are bottlenecks; be considerate of other travelers even on a short one.
08/26/2017 01:58PM
Usually take packs first. Either way I wouldn't leave the canoe in the water but have it out of the way. So I'd have to lift a second time packs anyways. Also bringing packs first I'm better able to attack any obstacles better that way. Especially in Woodland Caribou where I go in many remote places where a saw is needed a lot.
QueticoMike
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08/26/2017 03:45PM
I always take the canoe over first
Savage Voyageur
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08/26/2017 04:25PM
You pull up to a portage and unload the canoe and set the packs way off to the side. Then just pick up the empty canoe and bring it over to the other side and set it off to the side way out of the way. Then after everything is over to the other side load and go.
sedges
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08/26/2017 04:51PM
The only thing that matters is that you leave the landing area open and clear of canoe or packs. If you are carrying the canoe first make sure its out of the way when you go back for your packs. At landings with little room I often will float my canoe out of the way and tie it to a tree or alders down the shore. On a windy day that gets risky so it goes into the brush off the trail.
Jaywalker
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08/26/2017 05:58PM
I take packs first including my camera bag. If there's a moose or something cool on or near the portage I'll see it. Under the canoe I'd more than likely miss it. You lift the packs the same amount either way; one longer trip across the portage and one short trip between the shore and canoe.
Laketrout58
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08/26/2017 07:02PM
Same as SV. Marc
old_salt
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08/26/2017 07:31PM
Put your best foot forward...
SevenofNine
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08/26/2017 08:12PM
I take the main pack first to scout the trail.
Bigbriwi
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08/26/2017 08:48PM
Packs first so I can get the lay of the land.
mutz
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08/26/2017 09:53PM
Canoe out of the way, packs go first, out of the way at the other end, 2d trip canoe goes directly into the water, load packs move out.
Ho Ho
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08/26/2017 10:43PM
I like to carry the canoe first, but it's a matter of personal preference. What is key for etiquette is clearing the landing of the portage. Whether you carry the canoe or packs or whatever first, make sure you move your other gear off to the side so the landing is clear for other paddlers coming or going. Putting all your gear together off to one side is also wise to make sure that no one else mistakenly picks it up thinking it's theirs and takes it with them. It's amazing sometimes that some people in some groups have no idea what gear belongs to them.
carmike
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08/27/2017 12:03AM
Re: etiquette, as someone has already said, the only rule is to not block the portage. What you take first, second, third, or fifth doesn't matter so long as your gear doesn't get in the way of others who want to use the portage, too. Leave the canoe there and bring a pack, no problem, but make sure your canoe doesn't impede others.


andym
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08/27/2017 04:25AM
Carmike gets a plus 1 from me.

It is really nice if you minimize picking packs up and putting them down. But many landings don't let you have a canoe in the water and out of the way. On one trip we found a cool pattern. Get to portage. My pack goes off to the side. My wife's pack goes on her back right from the canoe. Canoe, including paddles and PFDs strapped to it goes on me. We portage. Canoe goes in water, wife's pack goes in canoe. She stays to move canoe if anyone else shows up. I go back for my pack. Only my pack gets put down anywhere but the canoe. Canoe is never untended or in anyone else's way. And my back was happier than single portaging now that I'm getting older.

So, think through your plans and strategies. There are many but the most important things are safety and being courteous to others.
pswith5
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08/27/2017 06:07AM
quote carmike: "Re: etiquette, as someone has already said, the only rule is to not block the portage. What you take first, second, third, or fifth doesn't matter so long as your gear doesn't get in the way of others who want to use the portage, too. Leave the canoe there and bring a pack, no problem, but make sure your canoe doesn't impede others. "
THIS IS MY PORTAGE! Get your own! :)
plainspaddler
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08/27/2017 08:07AM
As others have said the biggest thing is to try to put all your stuff in one area. I often will lift the canoe out and set it somewhere where it is out of the area and place all of our packs together near it. I like to take a load of packs on the first trip so I can scout the trail. Biggest thing is just don't have things laying around all over the place. Don't dilly-dally on the portage either.

Mike
Blatz
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08/27/2017 08:38AM
quote Bigbriwi: "Packs first so I can get the lay of the land."
What I do. You will learn what parts of the trail that need your attention for the canoe. Such as step downs, low trees ect. It gives you time to formulate a plan rather than do it on the fly
carmike
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08/27/2017 08:14PM
It's also nice to have everything stowed in packs so you don't have a bunch of loose stuff strewn about. I was once witness to a conflict at a portage trail where a group had, I dunno, maybe a dozen items lying about, all on the ground or resting on rocks. One guy had taken his sunglasses off his head and somehow they were loose, sitting on the ground with coffee cups, spare paddles, fishing gear, tackle boxes, Coleman stove, etc., and wouldn't you know it, someone not in his group coming from the opposite direction accidentally stepped on his Oakleys.
08/27/2017 09:50PM
I like to come sliding up and climb out of the canoe before it touches land. First thing out is the packs for the second trip which go directly up the portage 10 yards or so and off to the side of the trail. We then grab our packs and I grab the canoe and away we go. At the opposite end the canoe get set down out of the way of anyone else and we return for our last 2 packs. Biggest thing is have a system that works for your group and move as efficiently as possible.
Lailoken
member (30)member
 
08/28/2017 06:47AM
Just get it all out of the way and don't crowd.

I take packs first, to see portage and plan where need to go when have a canoe on my head and a pack on the back. I often carry paddle first portage to test mud, etc too.
ParkerMag
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08/28/2017 08:30AM
I'm worn out just reading about all the processes to consider and decisions to be made here - you all sure single portaging isn't the easier way to go?! Sure seems like it to me. :-))
schweady
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08/28/2017 12:56PM
Of course, you could just do it like these guys from Missouri. Nearly noon, we were almost out and they were just on their second portage in when we ran into them at the first portage north of Mudro... 11 people, 5 canoes, dozens of bundles (yup, we contacted both VNO and Canadian Waters with no idea on any followup...) We decided to wait it out, and were stalled here for 40 minutes. And, no, that wasn't the largest hockey bag.

MikeinMpls
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08/28/2017 01:36PM
quote carmike: "It's also nice to have everything stowed in packs so you don't have a bunch of loose stuff strewn about. I was once witness to a conflict at a portage trail where a group had, I dunno, maybe a dozen items lying about, all on the ground or resting on rocks. One guy had taken his sunglasses off his head and somehow they were loose, sitting on the ground with coffee cups, spare paddles, fishing gear, tackle boxes, Coleman stove, etc., and wouldn't you know it, someone not in his group coming from the opposite direction accidentally stepped on his Oakleys. "

Oh boy. This harkens to the "lost gear" threads. When people have stuff all over the portage, it gets lost or stepped on. Some parties take far too many trips across a portage. A canoe goes across, then a pack, then the fishing pack, then a paddle and one high-top rubber boot, followed by two rods with reels (and a lure) attached, a guy carrying a sierra cup, a water bottle, one pfd and the other boot. His buddy returns for the fourth trip across with another rod (minus a reel), the bait bucket, another paddle, and a sleeping bag carried in a garbage bag. And it is spread liberally across the portage. "Uh, Jim, you seen my sleeping bag," one asks. His buddy answers "yeah, I put it on top of the fallen red pine on the last portage. I thought you seen it."

We do 1.5 portage trips: my wife and I each take a pack, then I come back for the canoe. Like others, I like to see what the portage looks like for when I carry the canoe across. Plus the canoe weighs considerably less than the packs, so I get the heavy lifting out of the way. Pfds are snap-linked to the packs, fishing rods are broken down and BDB'd to a thwart, paddles are either BDB'd to the gunwales or slid into a handy pocket on the side of the packs. Water bottles go into the packs. Absolutely no loose stuff to drop, break or lose. Upon my second trip across, with the canoe, I put it straight into the water, and we load the packs into the floating boat (if the portage can allow that.) Minimizes damage to the canoe.

Mike
A1t2o
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08/30/2017 09:17AM
Packs first to see the trail and clear if needed then the canoe. We try to cherry pick our routes so we don't see too many groups, much less be at the portage at the same time.
andym
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08/30/2017 10:45AM
A 40 min wait? Hopefully you were enjoying fishing. In a case like that, I'd ask to be granted a spot somewhere along the shore. Although, I've only done that once, that I can remember. It was Sunday morning and there were so many groups leaving via the numbers that there was no way we were ever going to be able to land at the Lake One to Two portage heading in. So, we just asked a group to provide a lane where we could get our two canoes out, one at a time. Once we were moving we had a good time, lots of young Scouts wanted to share tips with us. A rather happy situation, seeing their enthusiasm, even with a lot of people. But I can't imagine how long we would have had to wait if we sat there.
Jackfish
Moderator
 
08/31/2017 08:21AM
quote carmike: "Re: etiquette, as someone has already said, the only rule is to not block the portage. What you take first, second, third, or fifth doesn't matter so long as your gear doesn't get in the way of others who want to use the portage, too. Leave the canoe there and bring a pack, no problem, but make sure your canoe doesn't impede others. "
What carmike said.
ockycamper
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08/31/2017 10:08AM
Let me give an alternate perspective.

8 years ago we were on a portage on Lake One. Rocky entry to the portage would only allow one canoe to be pulled out at a time. We had 3 canoes in our group and six guys. We had two canoes out and out of the way, and our third canoe was pulling in. A guy with two young men with him paddled by our remaining boat which was trying to get out, then began to unload and carry. . .right through our group.

I said something about waiting their turn. He stated he had been coming up to BWCA for 35 years and knew the rules. There was only room to carry one canoe at a time on the portage due to width. They plowed by.

Is anyone REALLY in that much of a hurry? Why not give the slower groups some time. . .or dare I say help. . .rather then just ramming through?
08/31/2017 12:02PM
In 2015 I was doing the Granite River route, just myself and 9 year old son.

This was our first BWCA trip, and aside from having too much gear, my 9 year old couldn't carry much, so we were triple portaging.

On our 4th portage of the day, we had pulled up and unloaded gear, and saw another canoe pulling up behind us, a father with teenage son and daughter doing a day trip with no gear, fishing equipment, etc..

I moved our canoe and gear to the side to allow them to land and pass us. They landed, unloaded minimal gear, then the father asked me, "Hey, would you mind if we gave you a hand lugging your gear?"

After a "Sure, thanks!" reply from me, each teenage grabbed a pack and a couple loose items, turning our last portage of the day from a triple to a single portage.

Now that's portage etiquette!



andym
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08/31/2017 01:27PM
I have the fear that I may be the person referred to as ramming through. Clearly no one should ram through another group and I've waited at plenty of portages. The case I mentioned on Lake One had a steady stream of people heading one direction with multiple groups loading into several canoes simultaneously. We just asked for one lane going the other way.
schweady
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08/31/2017 02:57PM
quote andym: "A 40 min wait? Hopefully you were enjoying fishing..."
No, but we did have a nice chat with another group who came up and waited with us. Compared trips, fishing spots, suggestions on where to eat when we (ever) get out... At first, I suggested pushing through, but the rest convinced me that there really was no excellent way to do it at that landing, especially with such an extensive yard sale in progress, so we just took in the show.
overthehill
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08/31/2017 03:43PM
quote RiverRatz: "When portaging do you normally move the canoe first to get it out of the way of arriving groups or does it matter? First trip, we've got 3-4 short portages - Thanks" You basically said it. Gear Canoe out of way usually in a couple minutes. And then go with a trip. (We double portage. Sometimes on the golf course we let a pair "play through". :) .oth
andym
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08/31/2017 04:11PM
Agree that carrying packs for others is part of good portage etiquette. We have both done that and had it done for us when double portaging. On single trips, the chance doesn't present itself.
ISRO
member (22)member
 
08/31/2017 05:30PM
Here I've been carrying the canoe and the packs all together, always wondered what that piece of wood with the notch cut out in the middle of the canoe was for.
carmike
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08/31/2017 08:53PM
quote ockycamper: "Let me give an alternate perspective.

Is anyone REALLY in that much of a hurry? Why not give the slower groups some time. . .or dare I say help. . .rather then just ramming through?"


Fair point, and while I'm not the guilty culprit in your particular instance, I've gotten upset with slow groups, plowed my way through, and been out of the way in about a minute. Initially, I do wait patiently for a few minutes, and during that time I'm calculating how long the entire process will take ((number of canoes x number of bags x number of loose items)/(number of people, their age, length of portage trail, etc.). If that's more than I'm willing to wait, and if there's any room at all for me to flip the boat, I'm on my way. Not exactly proud of it, but at my age I've come to accept myself for who I am.

I'm also single portaging 95% of the time, so I don't have any free hands to help carry stuff across. And I have found that unasked-for advice from strangers is often not welcome; I prefer to let people suffer into their wisdom, with me not waiting for them to learn. :)


carmike
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08/31/2017 08:53PM
quote ockycamper: "Let me give an alternate perspective.

Is anyone REALLY in that much of a hurry? Why not give the slower groups some time. . .or dare I say help. . .rather then just ramming through?"


Fair point, and while I'm not the guilty culprit in your particular instance, I've gotten upset with slow groups, plowed my way through, and been out of the way in about a minute. Initially, I do wait patiently for a few minutes, and during that time I'm calculating how long the entire process will take ((number of canoes x number of bags x number of loose items)/(number of people, their age, length of portage trail, etc.). If that's more than I'm willing to wait, and if there's any room at all for me to flip the boat, I'm on my way. Not exactly proud of it, but at my age I've come to accept myself for who I am.

I'm also single portaging 95% of the time, so I don't have any free hands to help carry stuff across. And I have found that unasked-for advice from strangers is often not welcome; I prefer to let people suffer into their wisdom, with me not waiting for them to learn. :)


rdricker
member (22)member
 
08/31/2017 09:18PM
quote schweady: "Of course, you could just do it like these guys from Missouri. Nearly noon, we were almost out and they were just on their second portage in when we ran into them at the first portage north of Mudro... 11 people, 5 canoes, dozens of bundles (yup, we contacted both VNO and Canadian Waters with no idea on any followup...) We decided to wait it out, and were stalled here for 40 minutes. And, no, that wasn't the largest hockey bag.

"


That looks like two groups.

The Kevlar canoe nearest looks to be a Northern Tier BSA canoe with the standard two packs. Hard to tell, but that looks like their logo and setup. The two aluminum look like they are from an outfitter.
GreyOwl
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08/31/2017 10:35PM
As one who has led groups of 8-9 people with 3-4 canoes I have always been keenly aware of the need to teach my crew how to portage efficiently, neatly, and without blocking the portage. Pull in, unload, set everything together off to the side in one place and pull the canoes from the water out of the way as quickly as possible. We talked about it before we ever even got to the outfitters.

These days my trips are only 2-4 people with 1-2 canoes and a lot more chill but I still follow the same portage practices and often grab a pack if there is one that needs to go the other way since I double portage most of the time anyway.
andym
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08/31/2017 11:09PM
On our first trip, we were passed at a portage landing by two guys that I found inspirational. We were double portaging, had just finished our second trip and were loading the canoes. These two guys came down the trail, put their solo canoes into the water, packs into the canoes, and pushed off seemingly without pausing. It was a small lake and we saw them reverse the process when they got to the next portage. It made me realize that portaging could be a smooth and easy process.

We've also been passed by people who bordered on ramming through and we had the feeling that they were racing to get ahead of us. That's not so inspirational.
Northwoodsman
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09/01/2017 07:32AM
I double portage and if the opportunity presents itself I always carry a pack for another group on my empty return trip. Even if someone is single portaging I'll ask if I can carry the pack. I believe in paying it forward. You could brighten up someone's entire trip if they are tired, struggling, or just simply having a tough day. I won't carry another canoe however because I don't want to be blamed for any scratches or damage if I trip or fall. If you don't do this I would encourage you to offer sometime. You will likely make new friends and your attitude will be different all day, so will theirs most likely.

I am never in a hurry and I prefer to wait until the other group is gone before I pull up and unload if it looks like they are unorganized. If they are unorganized chances are one or more people in the group can't identify all of their own gear and there is a good chance that while you are on the trail someone will accidentally grab some of your gear and paddle off with it . With that said, if I pull up and their is gear all over the place and nobody around, I won't "group" together their gear to make the area easier for myself or others to get through. It could be more than one group and you don't want to mix up there gear.

Some people are new to this experience, while some of us have been doing it for 30+ years. I tend to think that it is better to teach by example, in other words let people learn from watching you and your well executed technique rather than telling them everything that they are doing wrong and preaching to them on how do do it correctly. If you pay attention and strike up a conversation you will quickly be able to assess whether or not they are open to suggestions because they will likely ask questions or comment on your smoothness. At that point if they are open to a little coaching, give them one or two key points then stop. Don't turn it in to a portaging class. Be humble a let them know that it took years to develop your methods and that you learned from other along the way also.
lundojam
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09/01/2017 09:03AM
Portaging is exactly like setting up/tearing down a rock-n-roll gig, only quieter. Keep your feet moving, have a system, and LIFT THE BIG STUFF ONCE. Leave room for others. Rest at the end.
It is odd to be reminded of something as loud and smelly as a bar while in canoe country, but I think of it every time. :)
ockycamper
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09/01/2017 09:20AM
Lots of good ideas here. Over the years our groups (we take 2-3 up each September) have become much better at portages. However, we operate with the idea that we will get there when we get there. . .no hurry. None of our groups have pushed through a slower group at a portage.

We all come to this area for the peace and solitude. I just don't understand the "rush" to get through portages.

Years ago we moved from Ely to Gunflint. That elimnated the "problems" of the paddlers that were in a hurry and felt a right to plow through our groups.
schweady
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09/01/2017 01:05PM
quote rdricker: "That looks like two groups..."
Nope. They all knew each other. All had gear or garb marked with logos from the Missouri area.

The farthest I cared to follow up: John of VNO told me that this must have been the group that Canadian Waters called him about to arrange for use of one of his canoes. Look closer and you will see the CW and VNO logos. Seemed weird, but maybe it's something that happens more than we realize.
BuckFlicks
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09/01/2017 01:55PM
I don't see much of a difference for an order, fitting in with etiquette. Whether you haul the canoe first or second, you're still leaving it unattended at one end of the portage.

I prefer to haul the canoe first so I get the work out of the way first, then have an easier second portage. My paddle partner goes first with a pack, and he warns me of any obstacles that may be tricky to navigate with a canoe on my noggin.

Hopefully that big group developed a decent system by the time they had completed a few portages and didn't clog up the paths and landings any more than they did on that one.
rdricker
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09/01/2017 09:25PM
quote schweady: "quote rdricker: "That looks like two groups..."
Nope. They all knew each other. All had gear or garb marked with logos from the Missouri area.


The farthest I cared to follow up: John of VNO told me that this must have been the group that Canadian Waters called him about to arrange for use of one of his canoes. Look closer and you will see the CW and VNO logos. Seemed weird, but maybe it's something that happens more than we realize.
"


Yeah...I see that now. The Kevlar logo doesn't have the red border and blue interior of NT. It looking like a MN3 and with the packs a lot like NT uses, it threw me. Those hockey bags make me wonder if they were moving in!
RiverRatz
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09/02/2017 06:19AM
I'm from Missouri and I promise I won't portage like that... ;-)
schweady
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09/03/2017 04:25PM
quote RiverRatz: "I'm from Missouri and I promise I won't portage like that... ;-)
"

Show Me!! (ugh... sorry, couldn't resist)
mgraber
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09/06/2017 02:04AM
quote ockycamper: "Lots of good ideas here. Over the years our groups (we take 2-3 up each September) have become much better at portages. However, we operate with the idea that we will get there when we get there. . .no hurry. None of our groups have pushed through a slower group at a portage.


We all come to this area for the peace and solitude. I just don't understand the "rush" to get through portages.


Years ago we moved from Ely to Gunflint. That elimnated the "problems" of the paddlers that were in a hurry and felt a right to plow through our groups."


The problem with that kind of thinking is that it is completely selfish. The group pushing through might have been wind bound or lost and desperately trying to meet an outfitter on time. They might just like to travel fast for the workout, a timed challenge, or because they have an extremely short time in which to enjoy the wilderness. While we travel a lot like you most of the time, we understand that our needs and wants are not the same as others and would therefore never dream of dilly dallying on a portage when others were around, as that would mean that we are dictating their trip for them. Take your time when you aren't ruining someone else's day. It has always been proper etiquette to portage as quickly as you can safely and efficiently do it when others are waiting.
OtherBob
member (25)member
 
09/06/2017 10:07AM
On the west side of the Lake One portage, someone had left a canoe in one of the two landing spots. I moved it ashore off to the side. When I encountered the group on the other side, obviously rookies, I said the drill on these portages is to put your boats and bags off to the side so other people can use the landings and trail. They said "Oh, right, thanks, sorry". I can understand how newbies can be so wrapped up in their own concerns that they are unaware of other people, but they are like most of us, decent people who are not offended by a little educating given in a mild tone.

I have had to educate some of my own rookies more than once to keep our gear together. One time we guys were on one of the portages from Cherokee at the same time as a group of women. Both parties had both a khaki CampTrails pack and a blue Kondos pack, a rare combination. I warned my guys who were dropping bags anywhere to be careful - you might find yourself wearing pink underwear tomorrow.
ockycamper
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09/06/2017 11:44AM
I would counter that "selfish" can work both ways. We don't lay around at portages, and try to make the best time possible. However, a group pushing through our guys at the landing, and then forcing someone off the trail who is carrying a canoe slower then the one pushing by is just that. . .rude and selfish.

If someone asked us politely to move through our group we would have no problem letting them. It is the guys that shove their canoes into a tight landing and begin unloading right in the middle of the group all ready there. . .rather then simply waiting a few minutes for them to move off the landing. . . that is the issue in my book.

Shoving through a group that is trying their best to get through the portage, causing them to stop, move their gear/canoe, and let you through is simply saying that your time is worth more then theirs.
OldFingers57
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09/06/2017 07:02PM
We usually take a pack over first if we have never been on the portage ever before so we can check it out and see if there are any problem areas we may have on it with the canoe. If we have done it before then we take the canoe over first and then load it and shove off.
One big thing on portages is to not block them and do something like we experienced last week on a portage in Quetico. There was a large group of people fishing on the portage and so no room for us to land so we had to use an alternate route to land and get the canoe across.
MikeinMpls
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09/07/2017 11:34AM
quote mgraber: "quote ockycamper: "Lots of good ideas here. Over the years our groups (we take 2-3 up each September) have become much better at portages. However, we operate with the idea that we will get there when we get there. . .no hurry. None of our groups have pushed through a slower group at a portage.



We all come to this area for the peace and solitude. I just don't understand the "rush" to get through portages.



Years ago we moved from Ely to Gunflint. That elimnated the "problems" of the paddlers that were in a hurry and felt a right to plow through our groups."



The problem with that kind of thinking is that it is completely selfish. The group pushing through might have been wind bound or lost and desperately trying to meet an outfitter on time. They might just like to travel fast for the workout, a timed challenge, or because they have an extremely short time in which to enjoy the wilderness. While we travel a lot like you most of the time, we understand that our needs and wants are not the same as others and would therefore never dream of dilly dallying on a portage when others were around, as that would mean that we are dictating their trip for them. Take your time when you aren't ruining someone else's day. It has always been proper etiquette to portage as quickly as you can safely and efficiently do it when others are waiting. "


So rudeness is acceptable because someone wants a workout? Or because someone can't get their timing straight to meet their outfitter? Lack of prior planning on a paddlers part does not necessitate the acceptance of rudeness on mine.

Mike
BuckFlicks
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09/07/2017 02:52PM
It's a classic case of everybody who drives faster than me is a dangerous maniac, and everyone who drives slower than me is an oblivious moron.

Most everyone likely has good reasons for portaging the way they do. People in a hurry should mention to others that they are in a hurry because X ... whether that's a weather delay, injury, illness, or whatever. This will keep the other parties from taking offense at presumed rude behavior. New people may not know the intricacies of portage landing diplomacy and logistics.

All groups move at different rates and I think taking offense at someone moving faster or slower than you is a little ridiculous. Now if someone is blatantly rude or boorish about it, then they probably deserve a drawing from the karma pool. But having tolerance for other folks who don't portage exactly like you want them to also adds some brownie points to your own karma pool.

I'm a slow hiker, doubly so with a canoe balanced on my noggin. I'm always cognizant of others coming up behind me and do my best not to block their way. But I'm a lot less likely to be pleasantly accommodating to someone who was being an obnoxious ass than to someone who was unobtrusive or polite in asking me to kindly move off the path if I'm holding up their progress.
Bumstead
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09/08/2017 09:09AM
With 4 guys and two canoes, we 1.5 portage. So, the first two guys go with packs right when we land, the other two empty the canoes, leaving the other packs off to the side and shoulder the canoes. By the time the two canoes are crossing with the second pair of guys, the first pair is going back for the remainder of the pack load. The canoe carriers get to the put-in, drop the canoes in the water, and begin loading the first packs that came across. Seems to work well for us and was a real time saver from a true double portage for everyone. Pairing down the gear and arrangement of load in packs allowed us to do this, and I will never go back to a true double portage unless my destination lake is only a couple of portages from EP, and we're bringing in some extra luxury items.
mutz
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09/08/2017 01:30PM
quote BuckFlicks: "It's a classic case of everybody who drives faster than me is a dangerous maniac, and everyone who drives slower than me is an oblivious moron.


Most everyone likely has good reasons for portaging the way they do. People in a hurry should mention to others that they are in a hurry because X ... whether that's a weather delay, injury, illness, or whatever. This will keep the other parties from taking offense at presumed rude behavior. New people may not know the intricacies of portage landing diplomacy and logistics.


All groups move at different rates and I think taking offense at someone moving faster or slower than you is a little ridiculous. Now if someone is blatantly rude or boorish about it, then they probably deserve a drawing from the karma pool. But having tolerance for other folks who don't portage exactly like you want them to also adds some brownie points to your own karma pool.


I'm a slow hiker, doubly so with a canoe balanced on my noggin. I'm always cognizant of others coming up behind me and do my best not to block their way. But I'm a lot less likely to be pleasantly accommodating to someone who was being an obnoxious ass than to someone who was unobtrusive or polite in asking me to kindly move off the path if I'm holding up their progress.
"



Well put
mutz
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09/08/2017 01:30PM
quote BuckFlicks: "It's a classic case of everybody who drives faster than me is a dangerous maniac, and everyone who drives slower than me is an oblivious moron.


Most everyone likely has good reasons for portaging the way they do. People in a hurry should mention to others that they are in a hurry because X ... whether that's a weather delay, injury, illness, or whatever. This will keep the other parties from taking offense at presumed rude behavior. New people may not know the intricacies of portage landing diplomacy and logistics.


All groups move at different rates and I think taking offense at someone moving faster or slower than you is a little ridiculous. Now if someone is blatantly rude or boorish about it, then they probably deserve a drawing from the karma pool. But having tolerance for other folks who don't portage exactly like you want them to also adds some brownie points to your own karma pool.


I'm a slow hiker, doubly so with a canoe balanced on my noggin. I'm always cognizant of others coming up behind me and do my best not to block their way. But I'm a lot less likely to be pleasantly accommodating to someone who was being an obnoxious ass than to someone who was unobtrusive or polite in asking me to kindly move off the path if I'm holding up their progress.
"



Well put
mastertangler
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09/08/2017 05:42PM
To be honest it's why I quit going to the BWCA. When I had to wait in a line at a portage I said no-way Jose'

Other than that I give way to any canoe on the trail and always add the same encouragement........"your almost there" ;-)
mgraber
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09/10/2017 04:14PM
quote ockycamper: "I would counter that "selfish" can work both ways. We don't lay around at portages, and try to make the best time possible. However, a group pushing through our guys at the landing, and then forcing someone off the trail who is carrying a canoe slower then the one pushing by is just that. . .rude and selfish.


If someone asked us politely to move through our group we would have no problem letting them. It is the guys that shove their canoes into a tight landing and begin unloading right in the middle of the group all ready there. . .rather then simply waiting a few minutes for them to move off the landing. . . that is the issue in my book.


Shoving through a group that is trying their best to get through the portage, causing them to stop, move their gear/canoe, and let you through is simply saying that your time is worth more then theirs."


Understood, sorry if I came on too strong. I think it best if we just all be courteous and understanding of different peoples expectations, and basically stay out of each others way.
gsfisher13
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09/17/2017 09:43PM
quote Savage Voyageur: "You pull up to a portage and unload the canoe and set the packs way off to the side. Then just pick up the empty canoe and bring it over to the other side and set it off to the side way out of the way. Then after everything is over to the other side load and go. "
^^^^^^^
What he said. You should never leave the canoe sitting in the water on either end, you'll block someone either trying to enter or leave the portage that way.
 
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