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Bunk
Guest Paddler
 
08/26/2017 04:31PM
I'm in the market to purchace a canoe. Any suggestions on the best kevlar canoe? Want a stable canoe that can haul a load.

Thanks
 
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08/26/2017 04:46PM
Souris River Quetico 16 or 17.
MrBadExample
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08/26/2017 05:08PM
Yep
08/26/2017 05:25PM
Solo, Tandem, 3 or 4 man? How big a load? How will it be used? Etc.

There are a lot of stable kevlar canoes that will carry a big load, and opinions will vary.
08/26/2017 05:42PM
quote jcavenagh: "Souris River Quetico 16 or 17.
"


+1 - Souris River canoes are tough and stable.
MHS67
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08/26/2017 06:38PM
Might want to take a look at the Mad River Explorer in Kevlar.
Bunk
Guest Paddler
 
08/26/2017 08:26PM
Looking for a 2 person canoe 17-18 feet long
Jackfish
Moderator
 
08/26/2017 08:49PM
Pretty tough to answer because everyone likes something different. Best to look for boats in the 17-18' range and try different models. Even then, what you buy may not be what you prefer down the road.
mr.barley
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08/26/2017 08:54PM
Bell Northwind
08/26/2017 09:31PM
I have a Q17 but I try to paddle at least one rental a year on a family trip. The Bell Northwind 17 would be my next choice. I've canoed the Wenonah Escape and the Spirit II. I like them. Quite responsive and stable as well but not as solid as the Q17 in terms of stability on the water. Test paddle a couple and see you what you prefer.
08/26/2017 09:49PM
quote mr.barley: "Bell Northwind"
Well, I can't argue with that boat.
08/26/2017 11:44PM
A Souris River Q17 or Q18.5.
ISRO
member (22)member
 
08/27/2017 07:18AM
I spent 8 days traveling in Quetico in a Minn 2 along with three other parties paddling the three Souris River 17's.

No doubt they are a nice canoe but the design difference showed quickly when we decided to "GO" and get there. They are not as efficient and it showed.

Now if your not worried about being efficient then no worries, just take your time and cruise.

We had about 575 lbs total in the boat on our trip all up. For two up traveling the Minn 2 is for me "the" boat to paddle.

JMHO





overthehill
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08/27/2017 09:20AM
I personally like the Bell NWind
missmolly
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08/27/2017 09:38AM
paddling.net and canoekayak.com and oodles of reviews of pert near every boat you can buy.
08/27/2017 09:46AM
For stability you can't go wrong with a Souris River Quetico 17 or 18.5 but I feel ya give up some efficiency especially on flat water...I wouldn't want to race a MN II for instance on flat water...now if ya put 2 foot rollers on the lake I'd take on the MN II and feel good about beating it.

There are so many variables though and difference in skills/preferences you really need to paddle several canoes yourself in the conditions you normally encounter to know what is best for you. All of the models mentioned so far are good choices.

T
Blatz
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08/27/2017 10:42AM
quote mr.barley: "Bell Northwind"

That's the one
mr.barley
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08/27/2017 12:54PM
quote Blatz: "quote mr.barley: "Bell Northwind"


That's the one"
I actually have been paddling a MN II for 20+ years, but it's not a hull for everybody so I suggested the Northwind. It's probably what I'd paddle if I didn't have a MN II. :-)
carmike
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08/27/2017 03:13PM
I have two Minnesota II's and am very pleased with them. I don't quite understand the "stability" issue...do people feel the MNII isn't stable? It's efficient, light, easy to find, and plenty steady for me. And while I'm usually in no hurry when out paddling it, I do like getting to camp earlier while having to expend a bit less energy to get there.

But they're ALL good boats, and there will always be tradeoffs. The best advice is to paddle them before buying...You'll find one that just feels best for you. Midwest Mountaineering has an event in the spring that gives you the chance to paddle everything your heart desires.
jhb8426
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08/27/2017 03:38PM
I prefer the Bell Northwind or similar Northstar over a MN II/Wenonah primarily due to the bow shape. The Bell/Northstar have much better room for the bow paddler than the Wenonahs do. Plus they tend to ride over waves rather than slice through them and soak the bow paddler.
unshavenman
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08/27/2017 07:22PM
quote jhb8426: "I prefer the Bell Northwind or similar Northstar over a MN II/Wenonah primarily due to the bow shape. The Bell/Northstar have much better room for the bow paddler than the Wenonahs do. Plus they tend to ride over waves rather than slice through them and soak the bow paddler."
+1. I would take a Bell Northwind 17 or a Souris River Quetico 17 over a MN2 for these reasons any day of the week.
08/27/2017 09:14PM
I am really fond of my Mad River Malecite Ultralite... Jus sayin.
08/27/2017 11:58PM
quote carmike: "I have two Minnesota II's and am very pleased with them. I don't quite understand the "stability" issue...do people feel the MNII isn't stable? It's efficient, light, easy to find, and plenty steady for me. And while I'm usually in no hurry when out paddling it, I do like getting to camp earlier while having to expend a bit less energy to get there.

"


The MN II isn't unstable just isn't as stable feeling as other canoes. At least that is how it felt to me. Must be to others as I have pulled up to more than a few portages with people waiting it out cause it is "too windy" in waves that were really no big deal to me. For example my Quetico 18.5 is almost impossible to tip over... the dog and kids can lean way over the side, they can stand up and walk around, the dog can jump out and climb back in...not recommending any of this but that is what I call stable.

Probably a bigger issue keeping me from having one (MN II) is my bow partner hates the narrowness in the front. Fine for a few hours but for longer days it is hard on the feet for some people. I still consider the MN II a fine canoe, just a personal preference on characteristics.

T
ISRO
member (22)member
 
08/28/2017 06:05AM
quote timatkn: "For stability you can't go wrong with a Souris River Quetico 17 or 18.5 but I feel ya give up some efficiency especially on flat water...I wouldn't want to race a MN II for instance on flat water...now if ya put 2 foot rollers on the lake I'd take on the MN II and feel good about beating it.

T"

It is funny that you mention that, when we entered Agnes from Silence the wind was rocking and we had those waves breaking over the top. We all headed to the large island to the north east, with us in the MNII waiting there about 10 minutes until the three Q17s showed up.
08/28/2017 07:16AM
Touché that's funny...

I've seen the opposite too though, there are a lot of factors that weigh in such as experience and skill, that's why the OP really needs to paddle a canoe to make a decision.

T
Blatz
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08/28/2017 07:32AM
quote jhb8426: "I prefer the Bell Northwind or similar Northstar over a MN II/Wenonah primarily due to the bow shape. The Bell/Northstar have much better room for the bow paddler than the Wenonahs do. Plus they tend to ride over waves rather than slice through them and soak the bow paddler."
I've owned a MNll and like most Wenonahs they move well and track nicely. But like mentioned the Bow paddler space is a bit cramped. My wife is my bow paddler and she appreciates the extra room up front that our Northstar Northwind 17 provides. Actually my favorite Tripping canoe back when I had a need for speed was my Jensen 18. You can still get them.
mc2mens
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08/28/2017 11:19AM
I have the 17' Wenonah Boundary Waters kevlar canoe and really like it. It's stable - good for fishing and canoeing with kids - and it carries a load.
mschi772
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
08/28/2017 04:29PM
Might be better to ask which canoes are real turds to avoid.
08/29/2017 09:21PM
I have owned a Northstar (Bell) Northwind 17 for 3 years now and have taken it on several trips. It is a fast stable canoe. I have the kev lite layup. I bought it for several reasons. First, it is a compromise from the very flat bottom SR17 which while probably a bit more stable, is not as fast nor nimble. The NW 17 rides waves well and is roomy. It has more rocker in the bow and less in the stern. Second, the NW 17 at the time I purchased mine was several hundred dollars cheaper for a new canoe. Third, I was able to get all wood trim on my NW 17 but this was not possible with the SR's which only have alum gunwales. I simply like the aesthetics of wood and so for me, this was an important issue. Finally, even with the wood trim, my NW 17 weighs almost 2 lbs less than the SR 17. Not a big deal but not a bad one either. Downsides. The NW kev lite layup needs attn at landings because it scratches easily and the bow and stern do not have gel coats protecting the Kevlar. This can result in a fuzziness from abrasion. I think I will need to put skid plates on at some point to protect the layup. SR 17's may be tougher this way which is a plus. As others have said, all of these are very good canoes and one is best served by testing various models to see what works best for them. My 2 cents. Jerry G
carmike
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08/31/2017 09:01AM
Certainly fair points re: the narrowness of the bow of the MNII. I never sit there, so I have no idea what it's like up there. It certainly does look cramped, and enough people have complained about it online for me to believe y'all. None of my partners have, though, so I don't readily remember the discomfort some have up there.

I tend to think that if the waves are so large they'll swamp a MNII but not cause trouble to others in a different boat that I probably wouldn't be out in them either, no matter what canoe I have. :)

Bdubguy
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09/01/2017 03:06PM
I think you are describing my Champlain perfectly. My Northwind is definitely a faster boat, but does not compare to the champlains load and stability. I would be much more comfortable in big water in the Champlain.
Winemaker
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09/02/2017 10:02PM

Talked to four outfitters on the gunflint this past week and they all had wenonah, Souris river, and bell made boats. Asked them what boat is most popular with newer boaters, three said wenonah spirit II. Carries a load, stable, and more comfortable then some higher performing models. They had kind words for the other makes and models, felt good suggesting many other models, but the Spirit was literally mentioned first by three, second by one after Souris river 17.

Paul Sexton
Guest Paddler
 
09/06/2017 12:03PM
You may want to talk to a couple outfitters who manage their mainetnance on these canoes. I just returned from a solo in a Winnoneah. The canoe was awesome...stellar actually. Their bracing support system is superior to just about everyone else out there, especially the SR. The outfitter, Canoe Country, was busy daily reparing the cracks on their SR canoes. Not so with the Winnies...
09/07/2017 10:39AM
quote unshavenman: "quote jhb8426: "I prefer the Bell Northwind or similar Northstar over a MN II/Wenonah primarily due to the bow shape. The Bell/Northstar have much better room for the bow paddler than the Wenonahs do. Plus they tend to ride over waves rather than slice through them and soak the bow paddler."
+1. I would take a Bell Northwind 17 or a Souris River Quetico 17 over a MN2 for these reasons any day of the week."


+1 But I went with the Quetico 18.5
09/07/2017 04:54PM
I like my Spirit II.... Mine's a tuf-weave layup but was in a kevlar version up on crooked during the winds that blew up the Pagami fire back in 2011. Big waves, hard winds. Nice capacity for lots of gear and people.
Bdubguy
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09/07/2017 07:11PM
I believe the Champlain is a stretch version on the Spirit II.
Cedarboy
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09/13/2017 08:51AM
quote Bdubguy: "I believe the Champlain is a stretch version on the Spirit II. "

Not stretched but increased in size proportionatly.
Wenonah guy told me a few years ago the the Spirit II, Champlain and Seneca were all the same hull shape just blown up in size ie, medium ,large , extra large.
CB
mastertangler
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09/14/2017 07:05AM
quote mr.barley: "Bell Northwind"

I have not paddled lots of different canoes but I cannot imagine a better tandem canoe. The Northwind has it all. I have yet to find a single thing about them which could be improved, at least for flat water tripping. I prefer metal gunnels because they can be machined much easier than wood (adding things like mounts for depth finders etc) plus they require zero maintenance.
 
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