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SaganagaJoe
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09/13/2017 12:28PM
The coming of fall topic got me thinking: What are your favorite authors/poets?

Besides the Bible, I'm going to go with:

-Laura Ingalls Wilder. I devoured all of her classic books, many, many times as a child and I believe they were very formative of my, uh, agricultural and pastoral bent and attachment to the Midwest.

-E.B. White. A downright good storyteller who had the distinct ability to take the ordinary and mundane (as in Charlotte's Web) and make it a miracle, or the non-ordinary and non-mundane (as in Trumpet of the Swan and Stuart Little) and make it ordinary.

-Sigurd Olson. What else can I say? The guy taught me how to see the woods and listen to the singing wilderness.

And C.S. Lewis and Tolkien and......(BA in English).

What about you?
 
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mastertangler
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09/13/2017 02:00PM
Yo Joe......I have a saying > " life is to short to read fiction"

Sure there are some good fiction stories (Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier is a must read) but overall truth is stranger and far more exciting than what people make up, which is often just so much drivel.

I am currently reading "Street Warrior" which is about the most highly decorated officer in the NYPD back in the 70's. Stationed at the notorious Fort Apache in the Bronx and it is quite the story!
09/13/2017 02:08PM
Ernest Hemingway and John LeCarre are two of my favorites.
I enjoy many historical works and biographies as well.
I most recently read a book titled The Pueblo Surrender: A Covert Action by the National Security Agency by Robert A. Liston. I got it at a used book shop.
Earlier this year I read Losing the Head of Philip K. Dick : A Bizarre But True Tale of Androids, Kill Switches and Left Luggage By David Dufty. This was a very interesting read.
missmolly
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09/13/2017 04:07PM
John Steinbeck for his grit and heart.

David Foster Wallace and Martin Amis for their brains and range.

Larry McMurtry for his myth busting.

Pat Conroy for "The Prince of Tides (He had me at the title.)"

Ursula Le Guin for quantity with quality.

Tolkien for writing about how friendship is the wall-buster.
ozarkpaddler
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09/13/2017 04:54PM
With 33 years of marriage, my wife has learned to ignore my nightstand. I generally have 2-3 books and assorted magazines there with my Bible. I read every night, sometimes for hours. Most of my favorites are because they wrote about my interests, canoes and the outdoors. Heck, even Twain and London when I come to think of it? Besides those two, here are my favorites.

Sigurd Olson, no need to elaborate here.

Justine Kerfoot's "Woman of the Boundary Waters" and "Gunflint" are two of my favorite books.

Then there's Bob Cary who has several BWCA like "Rootbeer Lady" and "Tales from Jackpine Bob." Nice books with short stories and will give you both chuckles and tears.

Michael Furtman has several BWCAW guide books, but his season spent as a volunteer wilderness ranger at Crooked Lake, "A Season for Wilderness" is one of my all time favorites.

Sam Cooke "Up North" and "Camp Sights" have lots of little short stories to read at bed time or in camp.

OK now, don't laugh, but I'm a Laura Ingalls-Wilder junkie too. Even though I was a voracious reader as a kid, I never read the books. I always thought they were written for little girls? Finally, a friend convinced me to read a couple and I was hooked. I not only have her books, but other author's books from her manuscripts from their move to MO, the "Rose" years, Rose Wilder-Lane, etc. I even have a book with many of the original, ADULT geared manuscripts. I've been to her home where she wrote the books, Rocky Ridge, several times. It gives me chills looking at Pa's fiddle and Laura and Manley's wedding platter and thinking the history it's seen. You ever want to go there, I'm game! Wish I could have went to a 150th anniversary special they had not long ago.
overthehill
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09/13/2017 06:09PM
Louis L'Amour still holds a fond place in my heart.
Larry McMurtry as well. Mostly his 'westerns'

ALL of. Bill Bryson! :)

I guess I've read about all these three authors have written. Many more but these pop in my brain first.
Unas10
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09/13/2017 07:47PM
In no particular order; Louis L'Amour, Donald Westlake, Patrick F. McManus, David McCullough, Steven Ambrose, Aliastair MacLean, Michael Perry, Philip Yancey, Brian Freeman, Joseph Heywood, Robert Crais, Thomas Sowell, Lee Child(the early years).
jhb8426
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09/13/2017 10:33PM
Isaac Asimov & John LeCarre. I've read most of Asimov's foundation series a couple of time.
mc2mens
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09/13/2017 10:34PM
Some of my favorite authors would include:

Jack London
Ernest Hemingway
Mark Twain
Tennessee Williams
W. Somerset Maugham
J.R.R. Tolkien
Wendell Berry

The current pile of books on my nightstand:

Into Thin Air, Jon Krakauer
Listening Point, Sigurd Olson
The Sea Wolf, Jack London
Cold Mountain, Charles Frazier
A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold
A Walk in the Woods, Bill Bryson
Walden and Civil Disobedience, Henry David Thoreau
The Essential Rumi

ozarkpaddler
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09/14/2017 12:01AM
quote Unas10: "In no particular order; Louis L'Amour, Donald Westlake, Patrick F. McManus, David McCullough, Steven Ambrose, Aliastair MacLean, Michael Perry, Philip Yancey, Brian Freeman, Joseph Heywood, Robert Crais, Thomas Sowell, Lee Child(the early years)."

Heheh, I thought of and used McManus' book title "A Fine & Pleasant Misery" when telling about my day Tuesday on the river. Weatherman predicted "It will be a miserable day in the heartland today." It was a PERFECT day (LOL)!
lundojam
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09/14/2017 06:43AM
Check out Ivan Doig's Sea Runners
Louise Erdrich
Hemingway
Hildebrand
Salinger
McMurtry

I loved The Martian but can't remember the author.
mastertangler
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09/14/2017 07:22AM
quote lundojam: "Check out Ivan Doig's Sea Runners

"


Got it......will be here Monday.

McManus! Of course! About as keenly witty as it gets. And Bryson as well.

Speaking of humorous British authors Redmond o'hanlon might be of interest to the adventure crowd. He goes on some pretty sketchy trips and oft gets in over his head. "In trouble again" is excellent and "into the heart of Borneo" as well as "No Mercy" are all worthy reads and will leave you shaking your head and chuckling rather frequently.

I like audio books and have the Lord of the rings trilogy (now THAT will pass some time) but "Sea of Thunder" is probably my favorite and is a comprehensive history of the naval war in the Pacific detailing the actions and participants of the Americans and Japanese forces and is very fascinating.

Lastly (so many good books) "Empire of the summer moon" and "Bonhoeffer" are the reason I don't read fiction.
CityFisher74
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09/14/2017 08:06AM
JRR Tolkien
JK Rowling
John Sandford (can't believe he wasn't mentioned yet?)
Basspro69
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09/14/2017 08:16AM
Jesus

Tolkien

C S Lewis

Stephen King
09/14/2017 09:07AM
In no order, a few favs...

Carl Hiaasen
Michael Connelly
Lee Child
William Kent Krueger
John Sandford
Robert Crais
Joseph Wambaugh
David Baldacci
Harlen Coben
John Grisham
James Lee Burke
Craig Johnson
Paul Levine
Tony Hillerman
Papinator
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09/14/2017 10:13AM
I grabbed a few books off of amazon by sigurd olson; I didn't even know he wrote books until I saw a post from here somewhere, someone looking for reading material.

Quickly has he become one of my favorites! So easily takes you back to the woods even when your hundreds of miles away!!!

Sue Hubbell is another of my favorites...

missmolly
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09/14/2017 10:55AM
quote mastertangler: "quote lundojam: "Check out Ivan Doig's Sea Runners


"



Got it......will be here Monday.


McManus! Of course! About as keenly witty as it gets. And Bryson as well.


Speaking of humorous British authors Redmond o'hanlon might be of interest to the adventure crowd. He goes on some pretty sketchy trips and oft gets in over his head. "In trouble again" is excellent and "into the heart of Borneo" as well as "No Mercy" are all worthy reads and will leave you shaking your head and chuckling rather frequently.

I like audio books and have the Lord of the rings trilogy (now THAT will pass some time) but "Sea of Thunder" is probably my favorite and is a comprehensive history of the naval war in the Pacific detailing the actions and participants of the Americans and Japanese forces and is very fascinating.

Lastly (so many good books) "Empire of the summer moon" and "Bonhoeffer" are the reason I don't read fiction. "


I've long maintained that fiction is a story that pretends to be make-believe and non-fiction is a story that pretends to be true.
DeuceCoop
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09/14/2017 11:12AM
Can't believe no one has mentioned Willa Cather.
Grizzlyman
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09/14/2017 11:50AM
still a fan of Jules Verne. "Mysterious Island" is like survivor man/ bear grylls from over a hundred + yrs ago.
mastertangler
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09/14/2017 11:55AM
quote missmolly: "quote mastertangler: "quote lundojam: "Check out Ivan Doig's Sea Runners



"




Got it......will be here Monday.



McManus! Of course! About as keenly witty as it gets. And Bryson as well.



Speaking of humorous British authors Redmond o'hanlon might be of interest to the adventure crowd. He goes on some pretty sketchy trips and oft gets in over his head. "In trouble again" is excellent and "into the heart of Borneo" as well as "No Mercy" are all worthy reads and will leave you shaking your head and chuckling rather frequently.


I like audio books and have the Lord of the rings trilogy (now THAT will pass some time) but "Sea of Thunder" is probably my favorite and is a comprehensive history of the naval war in the Pacific detailing the actions and participants of the Americans and Japanese forces and is very fascinating.


Lastly (so many good books) "Empire of the summer moon" and "Bonhoeffer" are the reason I don't read fiction. "



I've long maintained that fiction is a story that pretends to be make-believe and non-fiction is a story that pretends to be true. "


And I have long maintained that we have some very confused folks who want to believe fairy tales are what's real and what's real are fairy tales.
SaganagaJoe
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09/14/2017 12:50PM
"I've long maintained that fiction is a story that pretends to be make-believe and non-fiction is a story that pretends to be true. "

And I have long maintained that we have some very confused folks who want to believe fairy tales are what's real and what's real are fairy tales."

I agree with both positions. I read non-fiction because it gives me perspective on real life and all too often is both more interesting than fiction. I read fiction because I love story. And I agree that too many people think real life is like fiction.
Cedarboy
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09/14/2017 01:48PM
Just read Eric Severides "Canoeing with the Cree", fun read. For those not familier, his account of his trip with a buddy from Minneapolis MN to York Factory on Hudson Bay when he was 17. A must read for paddlers.
CB
09/14/2017 03:17PM
Not sure why certain folks here cannot simply offer their opinion without explicitly stating or implying that others' are inferior. Man, we are talking about authors.
missmolly
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09/14/2017 03:40PM
quote mastertangler: "quote missmolly: "quote mastertangler: "quote lundojam: "Check out Ivan Doig's Sea Runners



"




Got it......will be here Monday.



McManus! Of course! About as keenly witty as it gets. And Bryson as well.



Speaking of humorous British authors Redmond o'hanlon might be of interest to the adventure crowd. He goes on some pretty sketchy trips and oft gets in over his head. "In trouble again" is excellent and "into the heart of Borneo" as well as "No Mercy" are all worthy reads and will leave you shaking your head and chuckling rather frequently.



I like audio books and have the Lord of the rings trilogy (now THAT will pass some time) but "Sea of Thunder" is probably my favorite and is a comprehensive history of the naval war in the Pacific detailing the actions and participants of the Americans and Japanese forces and is very fascinating.



Lastly (so many good books) "Empire of the summer moon" and "Bonhoeffer" are the reason I don't read fiction. "




I've long maintained that fiction is a story that pretends to be make-believe and non-fiction is a story that pretends to be true. "



And I have long maintained that we have some very confused folks who want to believe fairy tales are what's real and what's real are fairy tales. "


Whoa, Nellie!

Perhaps I should have elucidated my point. Eight people witness an event. Eight people then recount what they saw and you have eight stories. If you can't trust an eyewitness account minutes after the moment, what can you trust?

Likewise don't trust the disclaimers at the front of novels about "any resemblance to persons real or deceased is purely coincidental." Writers write about the people they know and have known.
mastertangler
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09/14/2017 05:05PM
Just yanking yer chain Miss Molly. You hit on my pet peeve however where now we live in an upside down world where lies (fiction) is embraced and what's real is discounted and often considered as false. Yup, you pushed my button ;-)

I do agree that novelists often base their works on real events and real people. But then again maybe not. I was conned into reading Dan Browns Davinci Code and got about 3/4 of the way through and considered it so much drivel and was astonished thinking he had made a bunch of money on this pile of refuse. That was when I decided to stop reading fiction, for the most part. Read Bonhoeffer and let me know which part is fiction?
overthehill
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09/14/2017 05:12PM
A couple more are Tony Hillerman and now QueticoMike, Wm Faulkner,
bwcadan
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09/14/2017 05:16PM
Add C. J. Box and Clive Cussler. Preston and child do good work also. P. and C. wrote RELIC which is in the top 100 of his genre says the New York Times.
mastertangler
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09/14/2017 05:19PM
quote overthehill: "A couple more are Tony Hillerman and now QueticoMike, Wm Faulkner, "

Whoa! Quetico Mike and Faulkner in the same sentence!
09/14/2017 07:08PM
In no particular order...

William Kent Krueger
Jodi Picoult
C.S. Lewis

I'll expand.
lundojam
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09/14/2017 08:19PM
quote mastertangler: "quote overthehill: "A couple more are Tony Hillerman and now QueticoMike, Wm Faulkner, "


Whoa! Quetico Mike and Faulkner in the same sentence! "


There is a connection-fish. You As I Lay Dying fans will get it. One entire chapter reads "My mother is a fish." Ah, that Vardaman, am I right?
ozarkpaddler
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09/14/2017 09:29PM
quote Cedarboy: "Just read Eric Severides "Canoeing with the Cree", fun read. For those not familier, his account of his trip with a buddy from Minneapolis MN to York Factory on Hudson Bay when he was 17. A must read for paddlers.
CB"


Love "Canoeing with the Cree," and there is a similar book of a more modern day journey from Duluth to York Factory by an author from Duluth named Scott Anderson; it is called "Distant Fires" and I've gifted that to a few friend's sons.
Distant Fires
jhb8426
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09/15/2017 12:29AM
quote ozarkpaddler: "Love "Canoeing with the Cree," and there is a similar book of a more modern day journey from Duluth to York Factory by an author from Duluth named Scott Anderson; it is called "Distant Fires"..."

I have both. Quite an adventure in both cases. Anderson's description of the travails canoeing Superior were almost as interesting as the rest of the trip, if only because it seems to be such an uninformed decision. Almost seems as bad as running some of the northern Canadian river rapids.
09/15/2017 08:17AM
quote ozarkpaddler: "quote Cedarboy: "Just read Eric Severides "Canoeing with the Cree", fun read. For those not familier, his account of his trip with a buddy from Minneapolis MN to York Factory on Hudson Bay when he was 17. A must read for paddlers.
CB"



Love "Canoeing with the Cree," and there is a similar book of a more modern day journey from Duluth to York Factory by an author from Duluth named Scott Anderson; it is called "Distant Fires" and I've gifted that to a few friend's sons.
Distant Fires "

I just read Distant Fires a few months back!
HowardSprague
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09/15/2017 12:26PM


Also, love Carl Hiaasen, John D McDonald (haven't gotten myself to read the final Travis McGee one yet),
Jack London,
have started reading some William Kent Krueger, liked the first couple I've read.
missmolly
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09/15/2017 04:24PM
quote jcavenagh: "quote ozarkpaddler: "quote Cedarboy: "Just read Eric Severides "Canoeing with the Cree", fun read. For those not familier, his account of his trip with a buddy from Minneapolis MN to York Factory on Hudson Bay when he was 17. A must read for paddlers.
CB"




Love "Canoeing with the Cree," and there is a similar book of a more modern day journey from Duluth to York Factory by an author from Duluth named Scott Anderson; it is called "Distant Fires" and I've gifted that to a few friend's sons.
Distant Fires "

I just read Distant Fires a few months back!"


I just bought "Distant Fires."
Dbldppr1250
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09/15/2017 05:52PM
I've enjoyed William Kent Krueger's books!
ozarkpaddler
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09/15/2017 07:28PM
How could I forget James Herriot? My neice just bought a Yorkshire terrier and jogged my memory! I'm always referring to stories from those books and I always thought decades ago I'd give anything to meet him and maybe have a "Pint" with he, Tristan, and Sigfried (LOL)!
dbpmw3
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09/15/2017 08:57PM
quote ozarkpaddler: "How could I forget James Herriot? My neice just bought a Yorkshire terrier and jogged my memory! I'm always referring to stories from those books and I always thought decades ago I'd give anything to meet him and maybe have a "Pint" with he, Tristan, and Sigfried (LOL)!"


You beat me to it! Started reading them in grade school and have read them all multiple times. Definitely one of my favorites.
SaganagaJoe
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09/16/2017 12:12PM
I just started reading Richard Proenneke's One Man's Wilderness. Wow, I'm hooked. Amazing read. I also picked up a copy of Fire Season by Philip Connors and am looking forward to reading it. Lots of wildfires in my home state of WA threatening property and some pristine hiking areas, including places I visited this summer.
mastertangler
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09/16/2017 12:25PM
"Smoke jumpers" will give you the inside skinny on that very hard and dangerous job. Another interesting read is "Shadow Divers" which came out quite a little while ago but is still timeless.

I also love reading about mountaineering and have a considerable collection. Grueling, dangerous and exciting stuff. Gotta get back into a shape other than round and go climb a mountain! Can you say " bucket list"?
09/16/2017 04:51PM
savage ancestors

just saw this posted today! looks good. amazon prime has it for $16 w/free shipping. free unlimited kindle..?
DaveOR
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09/17/2017 05:43PM
Wallace Stegner/Angle of Repose, Crossing To Safety
Ivan Doig/Prairie Nocturne, Sweet Thunder
Rick Bass/ Winter: Notes From Montana, Why I Came West: A Memoir
Barry Lopez/Arctic Dreams, Across Open Ground,
Farley Mowat/No Man's River, Never Cry Wolf, The Snow Walker
Sigurd Olsen/...all of 'em
Frances Page Jacques/Canoe Country, Snowshoe Country
Jerry Dennis/ From A Wooden Canoe, The River Home
John McPhee/Coming Into The Country, Survival of the Birchbark Canoe
Stewart Edward White/Wild Geese, The Forest, The Mountain, The Cabin
Elmer Kelton/Good Old Boys, Many A River
Witold Rybczynski/ Home, The Most Beautiful House In The World
Thomas McGuane/ Crow Fair, Gellatin Canyon
Wendell Berry/Unsettling of America, The Memory of Old Jack
Dbldppr1250
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09/17/2017 06:34PM
The Northwoods Trilogy by Chris Bostic - I loved the first 2 books and thethird one has great reviews!
Grandma L
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09/18/2017 10:00AM
William Kent Kruger - especially on a trip.
09/18/2017 10:53AM
I like John Muir. His writings helped people become aware of special places and lobby to protect them especially Yosemite and Kings Canyon N.P.
He called the Sierra Nevada Mountains the "Range of Light".
Sheep were referred to as "Hoofed Locusts".
Campfire wood was "Old Sunlight".

I like many of the Authors listed in this post too and am glad I learned to read.
mc2mens
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09/18/2017 12:35PM
quote DaveOR: "Wallace Stegner/Angle of Repose, Crossing To Safety
Ivan Doig/Prairie Nocturne, Sweet Thunder
Rick Bass/ Winter: Notes From Montana, Why I Came West: A Memoir
Barry Lopez/Arctic Dreams, Across Open Ground,
Farley Mowat/No Man's River, Never Cry Wolf, The Snow Walker
Sigurd Olsen/...all of 'em
Frances Page Jacques/Canoe Country, Snowshoe Country
Jerry Dennis/ From A Wooden Canoe, The River Home
John McPhee/Coming Into The Country, Survival of the Birchbark Canoe
Stewart Edward White/Wild Geese, The Forest, The Mountain, The Cabin
Elmer Kelton/Good Old Boys, Many A River
Witold Rybczynski/ Home, The Most Beautiful House In The World
Thomas McGuane/ Crow Fair, Gellatin Canyon
Wendell Berry/Unsettling of America, The Memory of Old Jack
"


Nice list. I've read many of the same authors/books.
SaganagaJoe
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09/19/2017 09:27AM
quote Zulu: "I like John Muir. His writings helped people become aware of special places and lobby to protect them especially Yosemite and Kings Canyon N.P.
He called the Sierra Nevada Mountains the "Range of Light".
Sheep were referred to as "Hoofed Locusts".
Campfire wood was "Old Sunlight".


I like many of the Authors listed in this post too and am glad I learned to read."


Donald J. Worster's biography of Muir was a good read.
 
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