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flopnfolds
distinguished member (399)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2017 03:27PM
When building a new bathroom in our basement, we were required to move from a gas to electric dryer. Long story, but code regulations.

When I put the new electrical line, off the top of my head I think it was 10-3, it was ridiculously thick. In the box, I put in a 30 amp double poled breaker. Each pole is 30 amp. This is what the HomeDepot people suggested so I followed their suggestion. I originally though using a 15 amp double poled, 15 at each pole would be sufficient.

The strange thing is the inspector looked at the dryer outlet box, asked if it was a dedicated line, but did not look in the breaker box.

My question is, did I just double what is required of most dryer lines by using the double poled 30 amp? Isn't that 60 amps going to the dryer? Seems like that is a huge energy suck.
 
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10/12/2017 03:40PM
You only pull what you put on for a load. I believe you're fine. The problem would be if something failed and the breaker was oversized enough that if that happened you'd burn up motor, wires or whatever because it took more than that to trip the breaker. I'd ask an electrician... Or read more in depth your dryer manual. They may have a q&a web page.
Podunk
senior member (80)senior membersenior member
 
10/12/2017 04:18PM
Ditto what nctry said. 30 amp is about standard for a dryer. I don't think 15 amp would be enough. Gotta love code inspectors :)
10/12/2017 05:59PM
In your household electrical service, you are provided, in the US, with between 220-240 volts . Let's call it a 220 volt service for simplicity.

The 220 volts are provided by two separate 110 volt lines coming into the house and are accompanied by a neutral grounding line.

A single breaker attaches to one of the 110 volt lines and feeds a 110 volt hot wire to the outlet or light fixture, etc. That circuit is "grounded" by a white neutral wire which returns to the breaker box where it terminates at a metal block where all the neutrals and bare ground wires are terminated together. A 110 volt circuit sends the electricity out to the appliance via the hot wire and returns the electricity back to the source via the neutral. Electricity only works when it can complete a path from the source, do its job and return to the "ground". That is why you can grab hold of a hot wire and not be zapped, unless your body acts as the path for the electricity to return to ground. Grab hold of the hot wire while wearing rubber soled shoes and you won't get zapped. Grab hold of the hot wire and touch a water pipe or be bare footed and you will be amply rewarded.

A single 110 volt circuit actually cycles on and off 60 times a second in the US.

A double breaker attaches to both of the 110 volt lines and feeds 2 hot wires out to objects requiring 220 volts, such as your well pump. A 220 volt circuit contains 2 hot wires but no neutral. The current flows out thru one of the hot wires, returns through the other hot wire, which then sends the current back. The current goes back and forth (reverses polarity) 60 times a second here in the US.

An electric dryer, or electric stove operate on both 110 volts and 220 volts. A dryer needs 220 volts for the heating element and 110 volts for the drum motor and light bulb. So a double breaker feeds 2 hot wires and a neutral is returned to the breaker box.

The proper sized breaker for an electric dryer is a double pole , 30 amp breaker. Each line pulls up to 30 amps. The proper wiring is 10 gauge, 3 wire. Two hots, which can be any color except white and one neutral, which is required to be white.

Hope this makes sense.


marsonite
distinguished member(2084)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2017 06:27PM
I believe a single two pole 30 amp breaker is functionally the same as two 15 amp single pole breakers, but it's not legal. One of the problems of using the two single 15's in place of 30 is that you could trip one leg and not the other, which means you would still have a live wire there even though one of the breakers is tripped. There are probably other reasons too but I know that's one of them.
10/12/2017 06:54PM
quote marsonite: "I believe a single two pole 30 amp breaker is functionally the same as two 15 amp single pole breakers, but it's not legal. One of the problems of using the two single 15's in place of 30 is that you could trip one leg and not the other, which means you would still have a live wire there even though one of the breakers is tripped. There are probably other reasons too but I know that's one of them. "

Not quite. A single two pole 30 amp breaker is functionally the same as two 30 amp single breakers bolted together. When snapped into place, it attaches to both "bus bars", each of which provides a separate 110 volt feed, which is what provides you with 220 volts.

You are correct that it is not proper to simply use two single pole 30 amp breakers because you could have one breaker trip while the other could still be live.
SaganagaJoe
distinguished member(2110)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2017 09:38PM
...wow.
old_salt
distinguished member(1990)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2017 09:56PM
Not another electrical question? Shocking!!
flopnfolds
distinguished member (399)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2017 11:20PM
Great. That was helpful. Interesting, didnt realize the dryer pulled in 220 for the heater and 120 for the motor .
10/13/2017 02:05AM
quote awbrown: "In your household electrical service, you are provided, in the US, with between 220-240 volts . Let's call it a 220 volt service for simplicity.


The 220 volts are provided by two separate 110 volt lines coming into the house and are accompanied by a neutral grounding line.


A single breaker attaches to one of the 110 volt lines and feeds a 110 volt hot wire to the outlet or light fixture, etc. That circuit is "grounded" by a white neutral wire which returns to the breaker box where it terminates at a metal block where all the neutrals and bare ground wires are terminated together. A 110 volt circuit sends the electricity out to the appliance via the hot wire and returns the electricity back to the source via the neutral. Electricity only works when it can complete a path from the source, do its job and return to the "ground". That is why you can grab hold of a hot wire and not be zapped, unless your body acts as the path for the electricity to return to ground. Grab hold of the hot wire while wearing rubber soled shoes and you won't get zapped. Grab hold of the hot wire and touch a water pipe or be bare footed and you will be amply rewarded.

A single 110 volt circuit actually cycles on and off 60 times a second in the US.

A double breaker attaches to both of the 110 volt lines and feeds 2 hot wires out to objects requiring 220 volts, such as your well pump. A 220 volt circuit contains 2 hot wires but no neutral. The current flows out thru one of the hot wires, returns through the other hot wire, which then sends the current back. The current goes back and forth (reverses polarity) 60 times a second here in the US.


An electric dryer, or electric stove operate on both 110 volts and 220 volts. A dryer needs 220 volts for the heating element and 110 volts for the drum motor and light bulb. So a double breaker feeds 2 hot wires and a neutral is returned to the breaker box.


The proper sized breaker for an electric dryer is a double pole , 30 amp breaker. Each line pulls up to 30 amps. The proper wiring is 10 gauge, 3 wire. Two hots, which can be any color except white and one neutral, which is required to be white.


Hope this makes sense.



"




Nice explanation. Now I know who to talk to about my issues... Building a new cabin.
flopnfolds
distinguished member (399)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/13/2017 07:08AM
quote nctry:



Nice explanation. Now I know who to talk to about my issues... Building a new cabin."


No kidding, I should have come here before I spent hours on the internet looking up electrical code!
10/13/2017 09:52AM
Electric Codes are for guys like me, i.e. lawyers. ;)
Understandable explanations like awbrowns's are for the real world.
overthehill
distinguished member(4271)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/13/2017 09:04PM
You are fine. #10 wire 30 amp . #12 20 amp . #14 protected by 15 amp breaker. 110 single space breaker. 220 needs double integrated breaker so you can't just flip one leg of the 220.
10/3 WG wire. Two hots (black and red) a white neutral and a bare ground. 30 am double breaker . The 30 trips before the #10 gets hot. Make all connections dam snug. Loose contact arcs and starts fires. Copper is king.
JimmyJustice
distinguished member (437)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/17/2017 01:07PM
quote flopnfolds: "Great. That was helpful. Interesting, didnt realize the dryer pulled in 220 for the heater and 120 for the motor .
"


220, 221...whatever it takes. Most of it is gauze and ball bearings now days.
10/17/2017 03:26PM
quote JimmyJustice: "quote flopnfolds: "Great. That was helpful. Interesting, didnt realize the dryer pulled in 220 for the heater and 120 for the motor .
"



220, 221...whatever it takes. Most of it is gauze and ball bearings now days."


Not sure I understand this one.
JimmyJustice
distinguished member (437)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/17/2017 03:38PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iX3kxAA2L4Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbWWxGmbS9s

JimmyJustice
distinguished member (437)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/19/2017 07:56AM

 
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