Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Winter Camping and Activities
      Got Wood?     
 Forum Sponsor

Author

Text

VaderStrom
distinguished member (364)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/09/2017 08:52AM
So I’m doing my best to round out my wood pile making tools for this winter and wanted to hear what combination of tools y’all thought worked well for making your hot tent stove wood piles. Combinations including but not limited to saws, wedge, maul, hatchet, etc... Do you bring any fire starter fuel, paper, kindling or still rely on down birch bark, shavings off dry logs or small sticks?
 
Reply    Reply with Quote    Print Top Bottom Previous Next
11/09/2017 01:59PM
I bring a saw and axe and a belt knife as far as tools. I don't carry anything heavy like a maul or steel wedges. I do bring along a small plastic wedge like you would use when chain sawing.

I also built a small wooden box that holds all my fire starting stuff. I like messing around making stove fires, so I have an assortment of goodies in my box. Char cloth, a bag full of short pieces of jute twine, several pieces of fat wood, strike anywhere matches, flint and steel, a magnesium rod, a couple of candles and a pair of stove handling heavy duty leather gloves.

My favorite fire starter is home made. I use a cardboard egg carton. Pour in melted paraffin and some pieces of paper from a paper shredder into the cups and you've made yourself some great little fire starters. Once cooled, I cut the carton into individual cups.

At the camping site I hunt for dead wood that is dry. If there is a question about it being dry, I'll thump it with my axe. Good dry seasoned wood has a certain distinct ring to it. I'll also test pieces by touching them to my lips. If its wet you will know it.

I don't use a hatchet at this time of year. A full size axe is better for splitting and is safer.

When in the tent I will often use the knife to baton pieces of wood to make into kindling. It's a pleasure to sit in front of the stove, basking in the warmth while I prepare kindling for the next day.

I never use paper to start any fire in my tent stove. The burning paper can go right out the chimney, land on your tent and ruin your weekend in a hurry.
Gadfly
distinguished member (203)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/10/2017 08:16AM
We keep it light as well, just a Dustrude saw and a hatchet. We used to bring starter sticks but don't really even bother with that anymore. Once we locate our camp we spend the next 3 to 4 hours gathering and processing our firewood. We are usually able to get enough for our 4 to 5 night stay over that time. Our priority is usually fishing so we try to get all of the hard work done as soon as we can so we can get lines in the water.
Jaywalker
distinguished member(1237)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/12/2017 08:14AM
GB Forest Axe and Bahco 24 inch saw. I picked up an Irwin saw but have not field tested though some swear by them. Always have fire starters and tend to like those long rectangular ones I think Colhern makes. Hated some round ones I got at Rei once - they rolled all over the fire box. Perhaps one novel thing that works well for me is before a trip I cut and fine split some 6-8 inch s cations of dry 2x4, and try 2-3 good hand fulls with twine and stuff them in a section of pipe. I love having basically 2 fires worth of great king ndling ready to go. Always seems like that very first fire is so critical, so saving even 5 minutes is worth it.
RainGearRight
distinguished member(1684)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/12/2017 09:24AM
last trip we brought a couple different saws, A Sven and a hardware store bow saw about 24" the Sven didn't want to cut too well. Bow saw worked well. I bought Dustrudes saw this spring and we'll replace the Sven with that. GB small forest axe comes with as well although I might puck up something a bit longer and heavier for winter wood processing.

We set up the tent and then gather a good supply of wood for the first night and morning. while fishing I like scan the woods for decent wood and collect it on the way back to camp.

Fire starters usually consist of Vaseline impregnated cottonballs in a ziplock and whatever twigs and sticks we find. I did find a 4lb bag of Garwood sticks at menards and will be bringing along a handful of those. it's nice to have a big pile of kindling set up for the morning to minimize time getting the stove going. I'm pretty good about being the 2nd person out of his bag in the morning once the tent warms up but with just two of us going this year I'm going to have to buck up and light the stove a few times
WildDog
member (20)member
 
11/15/2017 10:47AM
Great question and always good to hear what others use - there are some really great ideas here and a couple of new ones that I will try.

Historically I have used a Bob Dustrude Quick Buck Saw (the best portable bow saw made in my opinion), you can get them at / through Duluth Pack. I really do not care for the Bow Saws you can buy at the hardware store but would still take one of those over a Sven Saw, I never did care for those, the amount of space between the blade and the handle is just too small so cutting anything of any diameter can be a real pain. This year I am going to experiment with my Silky Big Boy saw - it is basically a huge pruning / pull saw... only issue is that it is best operated with two hands on larger diameter wood - that said, if the wood is stabilized somehow it will cut several times faster than any bow saw.

For axes, if you are on a budget, you can go with a cheap 2 1/2 pound "boys axe" from the hardware store but put a better edge on it with a file before you head out (and if out for a long time, bring a file) - otherwise, I also own a Gransfor Bruks Small Forest Axe, the temper and edge is second to none (that is what you are paying the big $ for) but honestly I like the handles better on the cheap ones from the hardware store.

I also always bring a good fixed blade knife like a Mora (Morakniv), they are cheap and indestructible (you can grab them for like $15 on Amazon), I use them to process dry tinder / firestarter.

For firestarter, I bring a gallon zip-lock of dryer lint and birch and use a tiny bit with whatever else I can find to get fires going. I also keep it available for quick / easy access along with a rescue rope for ice travel - that way, if someone goes in, the rope is handy and firestarter is as well.

For firewood I usually look for some dead standing that has some BTUs left - finding wood that burns the way I would like is usually the biggest challenge with the whole hot tent thing.
WhiteWolf
distinguished member(4830)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
11/15/2017 01:09PM
quote WildDog: "Great question and always good to hear what others use - there are some really great ideas here and a couple of new ones that I will try.


Historically I have used a Bob Dustrude Quick Buck Saw (the best portable bow saw made in my opinion), you can get them at / through Duluth Pack. I really do not care for the Bow Saws you can buy at the hardware store but would still take one of those over a Sven Saw, I never did care for those, the amount of space between the blade and the handle is just too small so cutting anything of any diameter can be a real pain. This year I am going to experiment with my Silky Big Boy saw - it is basically a huge pruning / pull saw... only issue is that it is best operated with two hands on larger diameter wood - that said, if the wood is stabilized somehow it will cut several times faster than any bow saw.


For axes, if you are on a budget, you can go with a cheap 2 1/2 pound "boys axe" from the hardware store but put a better edge on it with a file before you head out (and if out for a long time, bring a file) - otherwise, I also own a Gransfor Bruks Small Forest Axe, the temper and edge is second to none (that is what you are paying the big $ for) but honestly I like the handles better on the cheap ones from the hardware store.


I also always bring a good fixed blade knife like a Mora (Morakniv), they are cheap and indestructible (you can grab them for like $15 on Amazon), I use them to process dry tinder / firestarter.


For firestarter, I bring a gallon zip-lock of dryer lint and birch and use a tiny bit with whatever else I can find to get fires going. I also keep it available for quick / easy access along with a rescue rope for ice travel - that way, if someone goes in, the rope is handy and firestarter is as well.


For firewood I usually look for some dead standing that has some BTUs left - finding wood that burns the way I would like is usually the biggest challenge with the whole hot tent thing."


This is basically how I roll. Agree 100%. Good info.
mschi772
senior member (99)senior membersenior member
 
12/15/2017 07:11PM
Sven 21, Estwing hatchet, and an old trailing tip hunting knife from my grandpa (Solingen Buffalo Skinner--super common decades ago, but very well constructed).

If I had the luxury and inclination to "idealize" this, it would be:
Agawa Canyon Boreal21 saw, Granfors small forest axe, and....don't have a specific pick for a knife Fallkniven (3v or cos steel)? Mora (Garberg, Bushcraft, Companion, Robust)?
SaganagaJoe
distinguished member(2123)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/17/2017 08:29PM
Not a winter camper, but when I camp in the summer I use a Gransfors hatchet and Sven saw exclusively. At home I use a big splitting maul I bought at Ace and a hatchet. Both work well for me.
 
Reply    Reply with Quote    Print Top Bottom Previous Next