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blutofish1
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12/01/2017 01:07PM
I adopted a dog in February and I know the mother was lab but, I don't know what breed the father was. Any ideas or expertise on dog s. Alot of people are saying Rhodsian Ridgeback. He is a very good dog.
 
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blutofish1
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12/01/2017 01:13PM
blutofish1
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12/01/2017 01:18PM
Sorry something wouldn't let me load the pic
missmolly
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12/01/2017 01:25PM
Looks ridgebacky to me.
mastertangler
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12/01/2017 01:47PM
What do you do with it ;-)

No offense, I have a useless dog or two on my property as well. And then there is the big American Bulldog which will certainly get your attention as you pass my property. Now there's a dog which earns its keep.

Enjoy your pooch. Nice looking dog, goes well with the tile. Remember, the best way to train them from jumping up on you and guests is to mash their back toes with your shoe after they jump up. Make certain not to do it with anyone watching or they might come and arrest you for cruelty ;-) Alls it takes is a few times and they stop jumping on you, works like magic ;-)
12/01/2017 01:51PM
maybe a Weimaraner ??
goatroti
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12/01/2017 02:00PM
That's a terrible idea and it is cruelty.
To stop a dog jumping on you, put out the flat of your palm above his/her nose. Let him jump into your hand. After repeated nosings of your palm he will learn, like the fleas in a flea circus, that he can longer jump up onto you.

I feel sorry for the dogs who are maltreated by their owners out of ignorance.
LindenTree3
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12/01/2017 02:09PM
Get the pup DNA tested, we got our rescue tested for around 50 bucks.
My frugal wife found a deal on the testing kit.
Elsa is 1/2 German Shepard, 1/4 Labradore Retreiver and 1/4 Blue Healer.
We were right with all our guesses except instead of Blue Healer we thought some form of Huskey.
mastertangler
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12/01/2017 02:10PM
So let them jump into your palm nose first or mash their toes a bit. Not sure I see much difference. But thats what is considered "cruelty" these days (I couldn't help but mock such a concept in my original post). I have owned high powered dogs my entire life and they have all loved me but they also respected me. There was no confusion as to who was head of the pack. Dogs use ivory (teeth) to establish dominance. Is that "cruel"? Or is that what they understand? Just asking.........
BuckFlicks
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12/01/2017 03:11PM
Yeah... definitely got some Rhodesian Ridgeback in him... can tell by the hair. The couple I've known personally have been great dogs. Needy and demanding (but not hyper) where attention is concerned, no concept of personal bubble space, but smart and loving.

Occasional physical discipline isn't abuse or cruelty and it's about time everyone stopped saying it is. Both for pets and kids. If I catch my dogs peeing in the house or chewing on something they aren't supposed to, you can bet they'll get a swat. Do I beat them? No. Do I cause any lingering injury? No. Just a reminder that they're not supposed to do that. Putting a little pressure on their back toes is the same kind of thing. As MT said, it's far less than they'd receive in a pack environment. I doubt he meant to stomp on them like you're trying to escape a Full Nelson.
blutofish1
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12/01/2017 03:39PM
quote goatroti: "That's a terrible idea and it is cruelty.
To stop a dog jumping on you, put out the flat of your palm above his/her nose. Let him jump into your hand. After repeated nosings of your palm he will learn, like the fleas in a flea circus, that he can longer jump up onto you.


I feel sorry for the dogs who are maltreated by their owners out of ignorance.
"
blutofish1
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12/01/2017 03:40PM
I DO THE HAND THING
dew042
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12/01/2017 06:19PM
quote blutofish1: " I DO THE HAND THING"

[Booming announcer voice] Join the frenzy that sweeping the nation, EVERYBODY DO THE HAND THING!!!!!
12/01/2017 06:36PM
Congrats!
OneMatch
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12/01/2017 06:45PM
quote dew042: "quote blutofish1: " I DO THE HAND THING"


[Booming announcer voice] Join the frenzy that sweeping the nation, EVERYBODY DO THE HAND THING!!!!!"


LOL! You get "Post of the day award"!

(Except down here they'd say "hand thang")
arctic
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12/01/2017 09:01PM
quote blutofish1: " I adopted a dog in February and I know the mother was lab but, I don't know what breed the father was. Any ideas or expertise on dog s. Alot of people are saying Rhodsian Ridgeback. He is a very good dog."

Congrats on the new dog!! A good-looking' one, for sure. I hope you can get him out in the canoe ASAP. They adapt to the good life real quick...
HighPlainsDrifter
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12/01/2017 10:22PM

He is a very good looking dog whatever the mix might be. You did good by adopting. Congratulations.
MrBadExample
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12/02/2017 06:23AM
1/2 lab
1/4 ridgeback
1/4 beast



I adopted a dog off of the rez. For Xmas, my wife had him DNA tested for me.

Results came back and informed me they had no idea what he was.


I’d invest in 1 if those tennis ball launchers if I were you. :)
arctic
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12/02/2017 12:04PM
quote MrBadExample:
" For Xmas, my wife had him DNA tested for me.
Results came back and informed me they had no idea what he was.
"


LOL!
Jaywalker
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12/02/2017 03:30PM
I don't see much of a ridge on that back, even half of one. My guess is 1/2 Vizsla instead of Wiemy or R Ridgeback?
12/02/2017 03:44PM
quote mastertangler: "So let them jump into your palm nose first or mash their toes a bit. Not sure I see much difference. But thats what is considered "cruelty" these days (I couldn't help but mock such a concept in my original post). I have owned high powered dogs my entire life and they have all loved me but they also respected me. There was no confusion as to who was head of the pack. Dogs use ivory (teeth) to establish dominance. Is that "cruel"? Or is that what they understand? Just asking........."

Have had German shepherds all my life, and I have never hurt them to get them to respect me. Sadly, dogs do all love their masters, no matter how poorly they get treated. Your spew never ceases to amaze me.
12/02/2017 05:34PM
quote blutofish1: " I DO THE HAND THING"

Are you talking about your dog?
LindenTree3
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12/02/2017 05:55PM
I didn't want to contribute to an allready somewhat hijacked thread but here is a trick that works well to keep dogs from jumping on you.
When you walk into your home from outside, put a metal cookie sheet in front of you.
When the dog jumps up against the cookie sheet the feel and sound of his paws/nails on the sheet will be similiar to fingernails on a chalk board. The pooch will not like at at all.
scat
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12/02/2017 08:29PM
What is the cute little rascal's name ?
12/02/2017 11:21PM
quote mastertangler: "What do you do with it ;-)


No offense, I have a useless dog or two on my property as well. And then there is the big American Bulldog which will certainly get your attention as you pass my property. Now there's a dog which earns its keep.


Enjoy your pooch. Nice looking dog, goes well with the tile. Remember, the best way to train them from jumping up on you and guests is to mash their back toes with your shoe after they jump up. Make certain not to do it with anyone watching or they might come and arrest you for cruelty ;-) Alls it takes is a few times and they stop jumping on you, works like magic ;-) "



I guess your cute use of multiple ;-) made you look like a schmutz....once again. When you start a post with "no offense but", you should stop typing.
scat
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12/03/2017 12:42AM
No offense intended, I'm just hoping it's not Bluto.
mastertangler
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12/03/2017 06:10AM
What a crazy world we live in now. Spank your kids or your dogs and your a "bad person". Well I did both and very much like the results. Valedictorian of her graduating class and on her way to Harvard and she got spanked on a regular basis while she was a toddler. At 2 years old I didn't have the "terrible twos" or the "tyrannical threes". I NEVER raised my voice, never disciplined in anger but always meant exactly what I said and backed it up with a wooden spoon. She was very strong willed but I broke her early and by 4 years old I never had any issues again. BTW......those horrified of the concept say the childs self esteem will suffer. Perhaps if done in anger and if you hit with hands (violence). But when done correctly (always hug your child after punishment is administered) their self esteem is actually vastly improved.

I have owned dogs my entire life. All dogs are different. Some are very headstrong and powerful and shaking a can of coins will make them think you want to play. When they start taking items out of my shop unawares and start chewing them up then its time for a good old fashioned whipping. If they decide they want to bark all night they need to understand I will be coming out. Its best if you can get them yipping a little, that usually gets there attention that you mean business. Repeat if required. My American Bulldog was impervious to anything I could do and an electronic shock collar is the only thing which will get her attention. Her training is now complete, an excellent dog which I am well pleased with.

But that is only 1/2 the coin. The flip side is if you do the right thing the rewards are over the top. I am extremely heavy with praise and reward and believe in generous doses if you do what is asked. My motto was "If you listen good things happen, and if you don't bad things will happen". Same with my dogs.........ever walk a dog without a leash and have it stop at every curb while you walk ahead until you say OK? Ever put a treat on their nose and leave and come back 5 minutes later and they are still frozen?

I will put my spanked results against the naysayers any day of the week.
mastertangler
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12/03/2017 08:23AM
Well shoot, I need to digress. Sorry Bluto, I had not intended to hijack your thread, a little light hearted advice was all and now all this stone throwing. But who knows, maybe some good will come of it.

Lest anyone become confused about the effectiveness of spanking or whipping your dog it is not that easy. You just don't start hitting your dog and expect results. Here is my method:

The first thing you must do is bond with the dog. Easier if its a pup. Get down on the ground with them and play........and do it often. Take them to unusual places frequently. Different environments is key for smarting them up. And of course lots of treats.

After they have complete trust and affection then you can start to work on some undesirable behaviors. I will give an example of what I have had to deal with and explain the process of correction. I have a 40x80 metal warehouse building that I work out of. It is on 5 lots with a large fenced yard. A dog is very lucky to have such a large space to run around in. But they get bored, come into the shop and since dogs don't have hands they like to keep their mouths busy. That means grabbing stuff, taking it out into the yard and chewing on it. As a pup that might mean several times a day. You can't watch them constantly so you have to deal with them after they have committed the crime.

My tool of correction is a white extension cord which I wind up several times. The first week of correction is very gentle. I walk out to the dog who is chewing on something and say "Haaa" as well as "NO". Then I gently lash the dogs back with the extension cord. The "Haa" sound is very important. They will identify this with bad things happening in the future and its the noise that lets them know what they are doing is wrong.

The following week the punishment escalates slightly. One solid whack which causes them to be slightly startled accompanied by "Haaa". Eventually they start to understand that what they are doing is unacceptable. Once they UNDERSTAND then it becomes rebellion. I don't care what you say I am going to grab those $200 glacier glasses off your table and chew on them for a while. You only punish more severely for rebellion. They must know and understand what they are getting in trouble for. Dogs are typically very resistant to pain and normally shake a whipping off very quickly. But if the severity increases each time they reach a point where they decide its just not worth it. All this must be done with a dog which loves and trusts you without question so the bonding phase is crucial.

If anyone knows a better method I am honestly open to being educated. But mostly I have low tolerance for nonsense as I see it frequently in my line of work as I go to people homes and get to see how their dogs behave. Jumping up constantly and non stop barking while I am there. All the while I must smile and say "What a good dog". These are the people who don't believe in any sort of discipline and think its "cruel" to inflict a bit of temporary pain to have a permanent desirable outcome.

Good luck with your dog Blatz. They bring joy and become a family member. I just wished they lived a bit longer, good ones are hard to replace.

12/03/2017 08:59AM
I think I agree with Frenchy.
mastertangler
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12/03/2017 09:13AM
quote awbrown: "I think I agree with Frenchy."

The wisdom of tolerant Frenchy.........the dog Whisperer. He's had German Shepards don't ya know! Anybody with a differing method is just "spewing". Nice guy.
PaddlinMadeline
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12/03/2017 09:27AM
Beautiful dog! Looks a little like a dog I used to have. A pit bull mix named Sandi (RIP). Wonderful dog! Very loving and smart.
walleyevision
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12/03/2017 11:47AM
Looks like Homer Simpson's dog
blutofish1
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12/03/2017 05:20PM
quote scat: "What is the cute little rascal's name ?"

Peyton
Solobob1
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12/03/2017 08:40PM
Your dog looks a lot like a Vizsla, at least has Vizsla in it. They have a cinnamon colored coat, eyes and nose same color. I have included some pics of my Dogs, both Vizslas.

Bob.

Solobob1
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12/03/2017 08:50PM
I should ahve added, Vizsla have cat like paws and no under coat. I sure see a lot of "Vizsla" in your dog. Good on ya, nice looking pup.

Bob.
mastertangler
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12/04/2017 06:37AM
Adopted? A rescue dog?

Here is a rescue story some might find interesting. A small black pup with a blocky head was crying in the alley behind my property. It wouldn't stop so I went to investigate. What I found angered me.......they had tied the pup up to a bush on a rope without a collar and he had wound up and had pinned himself. They had a small plastic bowl out which was supposedly for water but of course he had tipped it over. It was obvious to me that the pup was also starved for attention.

The next day I went And placed a dog stake in the ground to keep him from getting tangled and provided a water container which he couldn't tip over. I also petted him up and played with him a bit. Poor little guy was lonely and neglected.

As time went on I observed the owners walking outside and scraping leftover food off their plate onto the grass for the pup to eat (I am not making this up). At that point I considered getting the city involved but instead started feeding the dog on a daily basis. My intent was to shame the people into taking care of the dog.

So this was a daily morning thing and I started liking the dog as time went by. One day I found the dog in my back yard having slid under my fence. I scooped him up and went and knocked on the owners door and said "I have got your dog". The person that answered stated that those people had moved and had cut the pup loose. I paused, and then told the guy that if he sees the original owners that the dog was now mine and I would give them $50 but not a penny more. I never seen them again.

I named the pup Rowdy. As he grew it started to become more apparent what sort of dog he really was. As best as I can figure he was a Pit Bull / Rottweiler mix. The 2 dogs I had always said I would never own (LOL). Body of a Rott but with the jaws and head of a pit. He turned out to be a truly great dog and I had him some 14 or 15 years.
nofish
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12/04/2017 09:37AM
quote blutofish1: " Sorry something wouldn't let me load the pic"

Looking at your pup I can see lab, vizsla, and/or possibly some staffordshire terrier. The ears make me think terrier as they are shorter than either lab or vizsla and they have the classic terrier look to them. The coat could be either vizsla or terrier and the body build with the deeper chest and how the chest/belly slopes up toward rear legs could also be both vizsla or terrier. Color could be either vizsla or terrier but looks to be very close to the classic vizsla color. The brown nose also makes me think vizsla.

I don't see any ridgeback in it, if its a lab mixed with ridgeback I'd expect the stature of the dog to be much bigger and the nose would likely be black. People commonly mistake vizslas for ridgebacks. I own a vizsla and I've had MANY people come up to me at the dog part or when I'm out for a walk and be adamant that my dog was a rhodesian ridgeback, some would even tell me that I was wrong when I told them it was a vizsla.

In any event its a good looking pup. If you really want to know you can do the DNA test but I've had friends do it with their dogs and it usually created more confusion than anything as the results came back with like 8 different breeds some of which you would never suspect in a million years. For example friend has what looks like a lab/border collie mix. The DNA results came back saying it was predominately german shepard, lab, and some small breed that I can't imagine how the logistics would have worked out for it to be able to breed with the other dogs in the mix.

If it does have vizsla in it expect a VERY high energy dog that also likes to be with you 100% of the time. Does it come up to you and lean against your legs? If so thats classic vizsla trait, they call it the vizsla lean.



mschi772
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12/04/2017 09:57AM
Yeesh, not only is there a lot of misinformed dog behavior and training advice being tossed around, but as far as I read, it was all being tossed around unsolicited as well. No one even ASKED for the advice that started getting slung around. The original poster was just curious about breed which, without an expensive (the cheap ones can be fun but are far from reliable) DNA test, is just a fun guessing game even for experts.

Please, everyone seems to have good intentions, but some of you have offered some downright terrible advice: mashing on toes to stop jumping? And without even acknowledging the many different motivations a dog may have for jumping which might change the approach someone would take; "good old fashioned whipping...it's best if you can get them yipping a little?!" I wish, after suppressing the desire to give you a "good old fashioned whipping," I could have the opportunity to who you MUCH more effective methods of training so that you no longer tout your ignorant cruelty as such a superior method of training.

As mastertangler seems like the kind of guy who will take this personally and defend his methods despite saying he's open to education, I will try to clarify for his defensive sake that I am not saying that there can't be a place for physical correction, but what mastertangler has described is not simply physical correction--what he has described is poorly implemented, excessive, ignorant, and cruel and has no place in proper dog handling.

Mastertangler, if I may address you directly... To look at this from a totally different perspective instead of raw credibility/experience/qualification, if you've ever noticed a pattern of multiple unrelated parties all feeling that your methods are, in some way, distasteful, please consider that it is much more likely that there may actually be a problem with your methods than so many unrelated parties all feeling the same way about your methods and all strongly enough to criticize them.

As an actual canine behavior expert and trainer (education in biology, psychology, animal behavior; instruction from a respected canine behavior and training expert; and professional experience handling and training dogs), I encourage ALL dog owners to chat with a true canine expert at some point whether or not they've recently adopted a dog. Oh, you've owned dogs your whole life? Frankly, I don't much care if that's the highlight of your canine behavior resumé--tremendous amounts of misinformation or even dangerous information has come from people with that as their entire CV.

If you want any sort of advice or assistance, there are real experts to be found in most areas. Yes, you often have to sort through a number of wanna-bes and "quacks" to find quality, but that's no different than most other things. Ask local rescues if they know anyone, vets, shelters, boarders, groomers...
hexnymph
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12/04/2017 10:07AM
Something about the head and eyes make me think there is a little pitbull in there.

I love mutts. Mine is Rottie, Lab, Husky, Sheppard, orangutan, fruit bat... and we don't know what the father was.

Hex
12/04/2017 12:24PM
quote arctic: "quote MrBadExample:
" For Xmas, my wife had him DNA tested for me.
Results came back and informed me they had no idea what he was.
"


LOL!"


Very funny!

I see Visla and Rhodesian but I am terrible at guessing and usually as accurate as the DNA test above.

My dogs don’t jump on me, the kids, or guests...there are many methods to stop that, what works depends on the owner and the dog. I didn’t read every post but the outrage seems more personal than concern for the dog. My neighbor used the hand idea...said his dog was trained then his dog excitedly jumped on my 5 year old son repetitively and about scratched his eyes out. Not proud but a knee to the chest (sorry my son is more important than the neighbors dog) solved that issue quick—-I had to do something and just reacted. Both survived, the neighbor still likes me, the dog is still nice to us and doesn’t jump...on us...he still jumps on others. Not advocating a certain method because I didn’t train my dog that way, just giving a situation for levity to the self righteous on here. A dog that jumps on people could potentially injure someone...especially kids or the elderly.

T
blutofish1
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12/04/2017 01:39PM
quote nofish: "quote blutofish1: " Sorry something wouldn't let me load the pic"


Looking at your pup I can see lab, vizsla, and/or possibly some staffordshire terrier. The ears make me think terrier as they are shorter than either lab or vizsla and they have the classic terrier look to them. The coat could be either vizsla or terrier and the body build with the deeper chest and how the chest/belly slopes up toward rear legs could also be both vizsla or terrier. Color could be either vizsla or terrier but looks to be very close to the classic vizsla color. The brown nose also makes me think vizsla.


I don't see any ridgeback in it, if its a lab mixed with ridgeback I'd expect the stature of the dog to be much bigger and the nose would likely be black. People commonly mistake vizslas for ridgebacks. I own a vizsla and I've had MANY people come up to me at the dog part or when I'm out for a walk and be adamant that my dog was a rhodesian ridgeback, some would even tell me that I was wrong when I told them it was a vizsla.


In any event its a good looking pup. If you really want to know you can do the DNA test but I've had friends do it with their dogs and it usually created more confusion than anything as the results came back with like 8 different breeds some of which you would never suspect in a million years. For example friend has what looks like a lab/border collie mix. The DNA results came back saying it was predominately german shepard, lab, and some small breed that I can't imagine how the logistics would have worked out for it to be able to breed with the other dogs in the mix.


If it does have vizsla in it expect a VERY high energy dog that also likes to be with you 100% of the time. Does it come up to you and lean against your legs? If so thats classic vizsla trait, they call it the vizsla lean.

You pretty much described my dog. He wants to be with us 100% of the time. When leave him he acts like we've been gone for a year. He is very smart and does have plenty of energy. Thanks you for your reply.


"
mjmkjun
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12/04/2017 02:29PM
Used to have a Ridgeback. My Ridgeback was one of a slender build and the back line wasn't as pronounced as the stouter, more robust type. Yet, I don't see hints of any Ridgeback in your dog. The nose........wrong for Ridgeback.
Love him well and it matters not what breed.

Other: Never seen a Vizsla before. OMG! What a beautiful dog. Those ears! I want one.
nofish
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12/04/2017 03:41PM
quote mjmkjun: "

Other: Never seen a Vizsla before. OMG! What a beautiful dog. Those ears! I want one.
"


There are days when I'd be happy to give you my vizsla :) Of course there are also days I wouldn't get rid of him for anything.


mjmkjun
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12/04/2017 04:56PM
quote nofish: "quote mjmkjun: "


Other: Never seen a Vizsla before. OMG! What a beautiful dog. Those ears! I want one.
"



There are days when I'd be happy to give you my vizsla :) Of course there are also days I wouldn't get rid of him for anything.



"


nofish, Are Vizsla's fiercely protective of their human family, like Ridgebacks?
(Apologies, blutofish, for the stray from the subject.)
Solobob1
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12/04/2017 05:14PM
I feel Vizsla's are excellent watch dogs and will alert when something is amiss. However, they are not guard dogs. They really do not attack, but they will let you know when something or someone is approaching. They are DEEPLY devoted to their family (pack). In general they are an energetic friendly breed that loves to run and do ANYTHING their human is doing. They just want to be with you .... everywhere. Some mornings I nearly trip on my Jake when I forget he is laying outside of the shower waiting for me.

Bob.
mastertangler
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12/05/2017 06:51AM
Mschi772

Hey I get it, your the judge and jury and expert. You have the framed piece of paper on the wall to prove it and all the right sounding phrases to show how clever you are.

No one said anything about stomping on dogs toes genius. Never said that and don't advocate it. Despite your criticisms I found no helpful info on your methods of instruction.

So out with it........Every dog I have ever had grabs things out of my shop and uses it as a chew toy. I use an escalating method of physical punishment to deter the behavior. I do the same thing with dogs who won't stop barking all night (they bark at Toads, cats, turtles other people etc). And what do you know, it works!! And your solution is? Please, I am leaning forward on the edge of my seat waiting to be instructed. Let me guess, it starts with the dog on a couch and me on a chair peering over the tops of my glasses with a pad of paper and a pen and asking "Tell me about your Puppyhood".
mschi772
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12/05/2017 10:36AM
quote mastertangler:So out with it........Every dog I have ever had grabs things out of my shop and uses it as a chew toy. I use an escalating method of physical punishment to deter the behavior. I do the same thing with dogs who won't stop barking all night (they bark at Toads, cats, turtles other people etc). And what do you know, it works!! And your solution is? Please, I am leaning forward on the edge of my seat waiting to be instructed. Let me guess, it starts with the dog on a couch and me on a chair peering over the tops of my glasses with a pad of paper and a pen and asking "Tell me about your Puppyhood".
"


Any canine behavioral consultant that would consult via forum posts is not worth your time. I do not consult without meeting the owners, the dog, seeing the environment, and witnessing at least portion's of the family's day-to-day for myself in person.

Mock and disrespect my experience and education all you want with flippant remarks, but you will not bait me into doing something that I believe to be irresponsible and unprofessional. It is quite likely that you have qualified professionals within reach where you live, and I encourage you to seek them out if you are genuinely interested.

quote mastertangler:No one said anything about stomping on dogs toes genius. Never said that and don't advocate it."

quote mastertangler:Remember, the best way to train them from jumping up on you and guests is to mash their back toes with your shoe after they jump up. "

I apologize for using the word "stomp" when you used the word "mash." I will edit my previous post in order to more accurately reflect what was suggested in this thread so that any confusion between mashing and stomping will no longer be an issue for readers.
mastertangler
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12/06/2017 07:13AM
Blah, blah, dodge and deflect.

You don't need a PHD to train a dog. Canine behavioral specialist? I need to go to one of those? Give me a break.

I strongly advocate spanking children and dogs. When done correctly there is no substitute. Huge difference between abuse / violence and discipline via physical punishment. And yes its going to hurt. Children will cry and dogs will yip. But the caveat is folks should only punish for rebellion. The child or dog MUST know what they are doing is wrong and they are purposely being disobedient. I do not break out the rod for kids doing dumb stuff and puppies being puppies. And lastly, I NEVER, EVER hit with my hands. Hands are for loving. Its not called the "rod of correction" for nothing. It is a symbol of authority.

You won't answer my scenario concerning correction because you can't. At least not in any practical manner. I do not have the time nor the inclination to follow the dog around 12 hours a day and catch it in the act. Its not possible. The method of an escalating physical punishment which might take several weeks to accomplish is the only practical method that I can conceive of and has in fact been used and proven for a VERY long time. I challenge you once again on an alternate method since you seem so very confident in your abilities and are so quick to point out how flawed mine are.

Picture this, your in the middle of a very thick swamp at night up to your knees in water with a large high powered hound on a chain. In order for you to get out together without constantly tangling the dog and chain in the thick woods what should you do? If you want to bond with an animal then go through tough experiences together and you will become best friends. That was my life for almost a decade. I will take my real world dog experience over politically correct "never spank your dog or kid" advice any day.

I am, however, sympathetic to the issue of abuse. Physical punishment can lead to abuse especially when done in anger and then it becomes violence and not correction. I understand the concern and it is certainly valid and not to be dismissed lightly.
mschi772
senior member (84)senior membersenior member
 
12/06/2017 08:18AM
mastertangler, you're not the first person to fling this level of disrespect for canine behaviorists my way, and you won't be the last. I'm sorry feel the need to behave this way.

If you need help finding a professional in your area, I already did a very quick search of your area. I do not know these trainers and have not seen them in action; all I know is what I could learn via the web, but if I was you or anyone else in your area, I might start with contacting Pawsitive Behavior Consultation in Lakeland, FL. Candy Hart of Training with Hart in Lakeland, FL might be another one to try. Another option may be Debbi Snyder of DogSense Obedience also in Lakeland, FL. To repeat: I only know what I could learn or educatedly assume from information about them on the web, but it's a start better than nothing.
mastertangler
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12/06/2017 08:44AM
Hmmm.........now I owe you an apology mschi772

My lack of honor was due to evaluating my own circumstances and personal bias. I am confident that there certainly are situations where your experience and expertise would be greatly helpful and appreciated by folks but it would be helpful if you showed you were actually informed rather than just claim to be so. There are few things more annoying than someone who is quick to criticize others particularly with such certitude and yet only claims expertise without backing it up. I have been completely transparent with my methods opening them up to scrutiny. And I am fine with that. You should do likewise and then we can compare and contrast. Doesn't that seem completely reasonable ;-)

Indeed I have had some perplexing dog issues which were beyond my abilities to solve. Fighting and jealousy comes to mind which is not something which can be solved via a whipping. We give all our dogs plenty of attention as I am with them all day but the dynamics are such that jealously can cause some very fierce fights to develop. I am at a bit of a loss to counter such behavior and admit my lack of a coherent effective strategy seems to have eluded me. Fortunately the Bull dog and Chow mix (the Chow mix got hung up in my fence as a stray pup and my wife insisted we give it a home) seem to be getting along a bit better since I have used an electronic collar and invisible fence to keep the Bull Dog off a part of the yard where the Chow hangs out (large covered patio). The Chow now has a "safe space". I had thought of getting rid of the Bull Dog but I like her. I suppose time will tell. They do seem to be doing much better lately.

In any event it would be good to sit down with a knowledgeable person such as yourself over a beverage and get your opinion.

Apology accepted? ;-)
mschi772
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12/06/2017 09:02AM
Yes, apology accepted, and you've got an intriguing story there with the bull and chow. Without knowing for certain what exactly was going on between them, I'll say your e-fence zoning is a creative one. Maybe there's a better way, maybe not--can't know without being there yada yada, but I like that you found a creative solution to at least try where most people with that problem would have done little to nothing or worse. I have no objections to properly trained and executed e-fences and collars; it's unfortunate that so many people use them incorrectly, and like any tool used incorrectly, I have problems with that.
mastertangler
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12/06/2017 09:23AM
quote mschi772: "I have no objections to properly trained and executed e-fences and collars; it's unfortunate that so many people use them incorrectly, and like any tool used incorrectly, I have problems with that."

Yes I completely agree. Having been in the coon hound realm for quite some time (I had a Grand Night Champion competition hound which was worth several thousand dollars) I seen first hand the abuse of electric shock collars in the hands of the wrong person. The collars in those days had 10 settings and some of the worst offenders would jump to 10 right off the bat figuring if a little was good then a lot would be even better. It was absolutely cruel and I held little regard for those who did such things.........and worse yet it was often counter productive!

Yes it can be hard to break a dog from running deer or chomping on porcupines but leaping to level 10 was not such a good thing. Hounds, and dogs in general, are very tough customers however and generally shake off a good whipping in mere moments and quickly gather themselves and whip that tail up in the air arched across their back and are ready to go like nothing happened. Dogs are lots tougher than people think.
nofish
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12/06/2017 10:24AM
quote mjmkjun: "quote nofish: "quote mjmkjun: "



Other: Never seen a Vizsla before. OMG! What a beautiful dog. Those ears! I want one.
"




There are days when I'd be happy to give you my vizsla :) Of course there are also days I wouldn't get rid of him for anything.




"



nofish, Are Vizsla's fiercely protective of their human family, like Ridgebacks?
(Apologies, blutofish, for the stray from the subject.)
"


I can only comment on the vizslas i've been around but I've been around many of them. I wouldn't say they are fiercely protective as I've yet to see one with much aggression at all. However, in my experience I'd say they are hyper vigilant dogs when it comes to their family. I've told people that my dog is a terrible guard dog but a great watch dog. He'll alert me to anything thats amiss but I haven't seen any sign in him that he'd protect me in the event of a threat however he's also never had the opportunity. I have however seen my vizsla and others put themselves between their family and something that they were unsure about.

When I take him to the BWCA he spends much of his time patrolling the perimeter of the campsite and its almost like he won't let himself go to sleep until we are tucked safely into the tent because he's worried he might not be there to alert us of something. I've actually seen him fall asleep sitting straight up before, you could see him fighting it with his eyes closing ever so slowly until he tumbled over. The tumble startled him awake and he went to do another perimeter check.
nofish
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12/06/2017 10:35AM
quote Solobob1: "I feel Vizsla's are excellent watch dogs and will alert when something is amiss. However, they are not guard dogs. They really do not attack, but they will let you know when something or someone is approaching. They are DEEPLY devoted to their family (pack). In general they are an energetic friendly breed that loves to run and do ANYTHING their human is doing. They just want to be with you .... everywhere. Some mornings I nearly trip on my Jake when I forget he is laying outside of the shower waiting for me.


Bob."


I should have read down one more post before replying. This pretty much sums it up for vizslas. Every one I've ever met has been cut from the same cloth.
mschi772
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12/06/2017 10:52AM
I haven't owned a vizsla, but I've known many. While I'm usually of the mind that unless a person has a very specific requirement, they should simply browse rescues and shelters until they meet a dog that clicks with them instead of seeking a specific breed, I will say that there are so many worse choices than vizsla. They tend to bond well with families without becoming overly protective of them or wary of strangers. They can have more energy than some owners are equipped to handle, but a great aspect of their energy is that they tend to have great "off switches" and can be nice couch potatoes when it's time for that. Like any dog with a thin coat such as theirs, however, make sure to invest in and socialize them to jackets/sweaters because they can get quite cold on their own.

All the same can be said for pit breeds, and to bring this back to the original poster, if lab is known to be one of the parents, I think pit or vizla are solid guesses for the other parent. Ridgeback would surprise me a little, but not too much. In any case, bluto, enjoy your new companion, take good care of them, make sure to positively introduce them to as many people, sights, sounds, smells as you can. Even if you know how to provide basic obedience training, enrolling in a local class at a kennel club or wherever can still be great cuz it's a quick and easy way for your pup to meet new people and dogs while still having something to do and reasons to stay focused on you.
Tman
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12/06/2017 05:54PM
quote Jaywalker: "I don't see much of a ridge on that back, even half of one. My guess is 1/2 Vizsla instead of Wiemy or R Ridgeback?"

x2 on the Vizsla
Solobob1
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12/06/2017 08:36PM
Vizsla's are great on and off the trail ... here I am chilling with my boys after a hard day of work. Vizsla rock. blutofish1 your new pup looks like a great companion- congrats!


Not sure why the pic is upside down, sorry.

Bob.
mastertangler
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12/07/2017 10:21AM
As per Mschi772 has suggested the more you can be with the dog and particularly expose it to new people and environments the better it is.

I have been fortunate enough to have had 2 truly fantastic canines. The hound I have already mentioned. But later I also had a German Shepard / Golden lab mix. He came out with a stubbed tail which was rather unique. My sister had the pup and when he was VERY little she asked me to watch. She said "sit" and on command the little rascal plopped down. Immediately I said "I want that dog". She said no but when she found her cat riding the pup like a horse that very night she gave him to me (He had respect for cats his whole life and never tangled with them).

Samson went literally everywhere with me. We would hike the levee most mornings (had a couple close calls with gators) and travel with me cross country several times a year. At rest stops I would walk him without a leash and a few times i would tell him to sit outside the building while I took care of some relief. He never moved a muscle and was big enough where folks wouldn't walk up to him. (yes thats rather questionable but I did it anyway). You could put treats on his nose and walk away and come back 5 minutes later. He might be drooling a bit but the treat was still there. He easily could of been a leader dog or a military dog.

There used to be this young kid who would walk this huge pit bull Rottie mix. He would walk with a tank top and show off his muscles and show off his big bad dog whom he had on a thick chain. He would get near my fence down the sidewalk and it was game on as they snapped through the fence..........my dog didn't like the big brute.

One day I was out in front of my house walking Samson by the canal and along comes the kid with the big dog. The kid lets his dog off the chain and when Samson seen the dog coming he made a bee line for him. I yelled at the top of my lungs "Samson" but he had other things on his mind. I just knew he was going to get chewed up or worse. When they met at full speed Sam took the legs out from underneath the big dog and put him on his back instantly. The big dog stayed belly up and didn't move a muscle with Samson standing over him growling. The neighborhood watched the entire thing and several "Did you see that" were thrown about. Samson certainly established his rep that day and earned quite a bit of notoriety. Years later I had people who I didn't even know stop me in Wal Mart (yes I shop at Wal Mart ;-) and ask if I still had "that dog".

He had his own Christmas Present underneath the tree and knew enough not to get into it until Christmas morning and he became rather expert at getting through the wrapping paper. He was our "baby" until the real thing came along.

I have quite a few other stories about this amazing dog but the point being is the more you play with them while they are little and the more you do with them the more socialized they become. New places I think is important.........yes all that takes lots of time and energy and I haven't been able to do it as much with some of our other dogs but thats the key to having a really great dog.
 
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