Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Winter Camping and Activities
      Winter camping gear list     

Author

Text

mc2mens
distinguished member(3958)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/28/2017 07:56PM
I'm planning to go on my first winter camping trip this February. We're going to be hot tenting. Plan to do some ice fishing. Any equipment/food lists you can offer would be appreciated.
 
Reply    Reply with Quote    Print Top Bottom Previous Next
Minnesotian
distinguished member(1577)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/29/2017 07:22AM

Don't forget the poles. I did that...once.
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(746)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/29/2017 07:44AM
I could e-mail you my list... but your e-mail link is not displayed.

I am a list geek.
Mnpat
distinguished member (103)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/29/2017 06:25PM
Most important
Exped downmat
En rated down bag rated for zero or colder
2 lighters
Headlamp
Dry bags for your clothes and sleeping bag.
Nils auger
Jaywalker
distinguished member(1347)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/30/2017 09:12AM
Bring something to sit on. Camp chairs may sink in too low, but milk crates work well, or sometimes I bring a small cooler mostly just for sitting. Candles are nice in the tent instead of headlamps all the time. And maybe a small quick dry towel or piece of fleece for under your chin at night to help collect the frozen breath and keep it off the sleeping bag.
Pinetree
distinguished member(12303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
12/30/2017 06:39PM
Winter time you have to bring a little extra of everything,especially clothing in case others gets wet or need more layering. Socks are the first to get wet. A couple extra pairs is a must,along with gloves which get wet often. Yes a face mask.
Minnesotian
distinguished member(1577)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/31/2017 11:50AM

Agreed on the face mask. I also bring ski goggles for crossing lakes when the wind is blowing in my face. Almost a critical piece of equipment at that point.
SevenofNine
distinguished member(2151)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/31/2017 01:28PM
Boot liners get wet too so a second set is nice to have. I find lighters can fail on me so I take storm proof type matches. Spare lights such as a Luci light come in handy. Having something such as a plastic container for small items will help keep them from getting lost.

If you haven’t checked out Wintertrekking.com you should. A treasure trove of knowledge at that site.
Jaywalker
distinguished member(1347)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/02/2018 09:30AM
Oh, and bring a bigger axe and bigger saw than you would in summer.
Pinetree
distinguished member(12303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/02/2018 12:05PM
Jaywalker: "Oh, and bring a bigger axe and bigger saw than you would in summer. "
I don't even bring a ax or saw in the summer-never,I don't need it it to find and burn firewood. The winter we will bring a saw or ax.
Campcraft
distinguished member (163)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/02/2018 08:45PM
An extra stocking cap or face mask for sleeping. You don’t want to wear your funky daytime one at night.
mc2mens
distinguished member(3958)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/02/2018 10:42PM
Thanks for all of the equipment tips! Keep em coming!
Gadfly
distinguished member (237)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/03/2018 11:40AM
If you have a dehydrator I suggest dehydrating some fruits like banana chips, strawberry chips and pineapple rings for quick easy snacks. For breakfast I usually bring some oatmeal and frozen eggs that I freeze a day or two before leaving. For lunch and dinner you can really bring whatever you want but we try to focus on foods that are light and cooked fairly easily. We always bring bratwursts as they are easily boiled or grilled and many times we bring pre cooked taco meat along with tortillas and cheese.
As for equipment I think most of the main items have been listed. We bring a hatchet instead of an axe to save on weight and we find that the hatchet meets our needs.
I can't stress enough the need to distance yourself from the ground when you sleep. I use the exped downmat 7 to keep a good 2 to 3 inches of air in between me and the ground and I slept like a baby last Wednesday night when it hit -34. Your sleeping bag will probably get wet during the night so bring something you can hang it up with in the tent to dry out during the day. An extra facemask and boots are great ideas as even with a hot tent it can take a while to dry out wet boots. You will learn a lot on your first couple of trips.
Pinetree
distinguished member(12303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/03/2018 12:28PM
Gadfly like you say even more than summer camping. Winter camping your always learning something and refining your gear and winter clothing.
I love the layering effect when on the move. You can always take off and add clothes.
One of the biggest mistakes I make was on one of my first trips we went a little too far the first day and also let myself get soaking wet with sweat. Came very very close to hypothermia. Did get my wet clothes off when made camp and big fire and dry clothes. Dry clothes is a must.
Also I like to have a nice pull over non insulated snow pants or like a rain pants to keep dry at times. Gators will do at times.

I also set camp out of the wind if possible. On the lake or back in the woods. Nothing worse than a strong wind blowing on you around the camp fire if cold.
Lailoken
senior member (52)senior membersenior member
 
01/03/2018 07:15PM
Hi, following this convo too. I've done 25 Queitco/BWCA trips, 2 Quetico solos (5 & 13 days), one Wintergreen dogsled camping one, late Nov frozen - no snow Superior hiking trail, but never BWCA winter. Since can't find anyone to go with me, likely solo-ish. Love the info here. Augers needed, or can use Ax to get through to water. Think know skis well enough. Sorry if too many questions here.
Pinetree
distinguished member(12303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/03/2018 08:06PM
Lailoken: "Hi, following this convo too. I've done 25 Queitco/BWCA trips, 2 Quetico solos (5 & 13 days), one Wintergreen dogsled camping one, late Nov frozen - no snow Superior hiking trail, but never BWCA winter. Since can't find anyone to go with me, likely solo-ish. Love the info here. Augers needed, or can use Ax to get through to water. Think know skis well enough. Sorry if too many questions here."

In my opinion early winter a ax would be find with less than a foot of ice. You start going deeper it can be done,but hole would have to be bigger and I never liked flying chips hitting my face etc.. If just for water not fishing you can get some augars with like 4 inch diameter and will cut very fast.
I also think the first winter camping trip maybe camp some place like only a 4 hour walk out.
Also like I said March and long days and much warmer is great.

Another item is a good pair of sun glasses,that sunlight off snow can be very hard on eyes.
Soledad
distinguished member(1716)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/04/2018 09:48AM
If you want to check out an actual list of gear, I have used
this one download and edit it to suit your needs.
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(746)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/04/2018 01:06PM
Soledad: "If you want to check out an actual list of gear, I have used
this one download and edit it to suit your needs."


my list and notes

Use the tabs at the bottom
mc2mens
distinguished member(3958)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/04/2018 01:54PM
You guys rock! Thanks for the lists!

A lot of you talk about removing your liners from boots to dry them out. Are you wearing Sorels (or something like them)? I was thinking of wearing my Cabela's Whitetail extreme hunting boots. They have 1200 g thinsulate (no liners) and are waterproof (at least more so than my Sorels). Is there a consensus on the best boots to wear winter camping?
Pinetree
distinguished member(12303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/04/2018 04:08PM
mc2mens: "You guys rock! Thanks for the lists!


A lot of you talk about removing your liners from boots to dry them out. Are you wearing Sorels (or something like them)? I was thinking of wearing my Cabela's Whitetail extreme hunting boots. They have 1200 g thinsulate (no liners) and are waterproof (at least more so than my Sorels). Is there a consensus on the best boots to wear winter camping?"



I ski in with a back country-trail ski boot,brother just uses a regular ski boot. We both use sorrels with a liner we put on when at camp.
I know I have various gore tex boots and they all leak after awhile if your standing in water-slush on the lake. So there it would matter time of year your going. Been there when there is like a foot of slush-water and also many times in March just a couple inches of snow.

Campcraft
distinguished member (163)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/04/2018 08:09PM
It helps if your clothing can be taken apart to dry. Boots with liners, mittens with liners, wind shell and liners. Two thin caps vs. one thick one, etc.
Soledad
distinguished member(1716)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/05/2018 09:13AM
mc2mens: "You guys rock! Thanks for the lists!


A lot of you talk about removing your liners from boots to dry them out. Are you wearing Sorels (or something like them)? I was thinking of wearing my Cabela's Whitetail extreme hunting boots. They have 1200 g thinsulate (no liners) and are waterproof (at least more so than my Sorels). Is there a consensus on the best boots to wear winter camping?"


I use Steger Mukluks and remove the liners at night. One night I didn't and that morning was -34f and nature called...loudly. The boots were frozen solid and I couldn't get them on my feet. Not a good way to start a day.

I have a pair of Sorels as well, and love them for ice fishing and for warmer wetter weather.
Soledad
distinguished member(1716)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/05/2018 09:24AM
bobbernumber3: "Soledad: "If you want to check out an actual list of gear, I have used
this one download and edit it to suit your needs."



my list and notes

Use the tabs at the bottom"


That is a heckofa list! Fun to read through!
 
Reply    Reply with Quote    Print Top Bottom Previous Next