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IowaFishinGuy
member (23)member
 
06/02/2018 04:05PM
I'm heading on my first trip to the BWCA in 2 weeks, and finishing up my packing list, and I was just curious what small/often overlooked items or gear do I need to remember to bring that may not be the standard camping gear, but instead specific to canoe/BWCA camping?

Also, I'm thinking of taking some paper towels along. My plan was to unroll some, and fold them up and put in a ziploc bag. Any thoughts on this or better alternatives?

Thanks
 
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OldFingers57
distinguished member(5374)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
06/02/2018 07:20PM
We usually just take a partial roll of paper towels and put them in a large heavy duty ziplock. As for other things to take make sure you have all licenses and permits. Don’t forget the TP. Bring a set of clothes to change into and leave them in the car. Leave a Float plan with someone back home of your route, color of tent and tarp, make, model and lic plate number of car. Don’t forget sunglasses or prescription meds. If bringing cold or frozen foods don’t forget them at home. This seems to be a common thing to forget from reading past posts.
GraniteCliffs
distinguished member(1565)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/02/2018 07:24PM
Don't forget:
A good attitude no matter what happens!
DEET
Gerber type knife
Tent and sleeping bag
lifejacket
spare paddle
yoke
Flashlight of some sort
Rain gear
First aid kit
TP
Lighters/matches
fishing license
permit
Something to clean dishes with
I always carry a REI soft camp chair that slips in my Duluth Pack for support and comfort and is great to sit in in camp
Maps
Cook kit
hat

GraniteCliffs
distinguished member(1565)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/02/2018 07:30PM
Your question is why I have a couple of Word lists to refer to on every trip I take. After 45 plus years of tripping I should know what to bring but the lists make sure and give me reassurance. I still like hitting camp the first night to set up and find I have everything I need.
06/02/2018 07:43PM
Along with things already mentioned, don't forget "painters" for the canoe.

Also, headnet, camp shoes and socks, tarp, ditch kit.

I don't have any need to take paper towels, but YMMV.
cburton103
distinguished member (286)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/02/2018 08:53PM
boonie: "Along with things already mentioned, don't forget "painters" for the canoe.


Also, headnet, camp shoes and socks, tarp, ditch kit.


I don't have any need to take paper towels, but YMMV.
"


Headnet!! Some trips could be miserable without one.

I consider my camping style fairly lightweight, and I do find myself bringing a half roll of paper towels for a week. I only do this for canoe camping, not backpacking.
VoyageurNorth
distinguished member(2539)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/03/2018 05:19AM
A few wooden clothes pins. I have tried the twisting the rope to hold clothes on the line to dry, doesn't work so well. The pins hold the edges of what I hang so it dries better & doesn't fall off the line.
DrBobDg
distinguished member(834)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/03/2018 06:38AM
CHAPSTICK>>>
you won't believe how dry the lips might get.
Living in dairy country I take a bunch of those single use paper towels....the same kind you see in dispensers in some commercial bathroooms.
I put a good handful in a zip lock bag.
2 gallon ziplock bags are real handy as well for stuff.
steel scrubbing pad is handy.

they first trip has a steep learning curve. Take good notes for the next one and develop a list.

have a great time.

dr bob

Bumstead
distinguished member (231)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/03/2018 06:50AM
Enjoy your first trip! I would say make sure you're taking the least amount of 'stuff' possible. You will more quickly learn what you should've left at home compared to things you forgot.

The thing I've improved most over a few years is packing method.....as few loose things as possible for portaging.


GearJunkie
distinguished member (104)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/03/2018 09:07AM
First time? Not an item but...... Test your rain suit. When you think its good, test it again.

mutz
distinguished member(1302)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/03/2018 09:35AM
A small package of wet wipes are an absolute necessity and take up very little space. In the warmer weather we wear inflatable life vests, much cooler when paddling in 80 degree weather, but if you take an inflatable take a spare co2 cartridge in case you have to use it.
SummerSkin
member (46)member
 
06/03/2018 10:10AM
Forget the paper towels and TP and take these:

EZ Towels

They look like little pills or life saver candies. They are individually wrapped and expand to about the size of a regular paper towel when you add water. They are also biodegradable. I took about 20 or so in my pack and was very glad I did. They’re extremely versatile — can be used as TP, for washing dishes, a wash rag, general cleaning, etc. I saw a recommendation for them here on this forum, and I’m glad I did. These will be a staple in my pack from now on. I can’t recommend them enough!
IowaFishinGuy
member (23)member
 
06/03/2018 10:18AM
boonie: "Along with things already mentioned, don't forget "painters" for the canoe.


Also, headnet, camp shoes and socks, tarp, ditch kit.


I don't have any need to take paper towels, but YMMV.
"


What are painters? I guess I don't know all of the canoe lingo yet haha.
06/03/2018 10:53AM
Lines tied to the bow and stern of the canoe and used to line it through rapids or shallows and to tie it up so it doesn't blow away.
MH1968
 
06/03/2018 11:00AM
Don’t forget to take a headlamp and also bring a sponge with to soak up water in your canoe!
06/03/2018 12:08PM
Pool noodles / pipe insulation on edge of canoe where your knees will rest on the sides
Jaywalker
distinguished member(1410)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/03/2018 01:25PM
I's say yes to a small number of paper towels. I typically get the ones that tear to 5 inch sections, tear them into twos', and allow one pair of two for each day. They are folded over and in a zip lock with some tin foil. I'm currently looking at trying reusable towels to cut down on bulk and waste.

Bring pen, paper, and whatever packing list you have. Every one of us has a slightly different packing list, and those develop over time. Best thing you can do is make notes as you go about what works, what doesn't, what gets used, etc. because it's really hard to remember later on. When your personal list gets done, you wont forget anything. Mine details what to leave in car, what to put in pockets, things to check before starting my car (fridge/freezer, plants watered, windows closed, what to pick up in Ely, etc). My list goes on a clip board in my front seat, and it helps a lot.
06/03/2018 03:51PM
Like Jaywalker, I have my own personalized list(s), which have been modified over the years from a generalized list I started with. I also have different ones and they are fairly extensive and detailed. There's the packing list, of course, and a list of things to do before packing with a general timetable. I have a longer trip up and have lists for that stuff and things to do for that as well. The packing list includes items like first aid kit, repair kit, ditch kit, personal items, that have their own separate list. Of course, there's a separate menu each time. The packing list doesn't just have tent - it has tent body, fly, #poles, #stakes, guylines.
06/03/2018 04:01PM
boonie: "Lines tied to the bow and stern of the canoe and used to line it through rapids or shallows and to tie it up so it doesn't blow away. "


BTW, get some boating line that won't absorb water, isn't too small or too big. I got a pack that was 50 feet (3/8 in., I think) and cut in half, attach to bow and stern thwarts, and secure with BDB's or something similar. Or just fold into about a 2-foot length, wrap around thwart and tie an overhand knot, which is what I did in the beginning, but the BDB's, twist ties are better.
4keys
distinguished member(510)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/03/2018 09:27PM
We always bring some paper towels, especially if we're frying fish. Very handing for wiping breading off hands, etc. I often take a small dish towel to dry dishes before packing them and the paper towel keeps that cleaner. This of coarse will depend on your menu.

If you need glasses, take a second pair.
Wet wipes.
Small bottle of purel , kept with tp and/or kitchen stuff.
Chapstick.
Travel cribbage board.
DBDs or bungee cords. Lots of uses.
A few emergency fire starters. Even without an emergency they are useful if all your wood is wet.
Common sense and a healthy respect for Mother Nature. Know your abilities and limits.

analyzer
distinguished member(1610)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/04/2018 12:27AM
I see a couple people listed TP. I recall someone on this board, who went as a group, and two different people were in charge of "TP".

They both brought Tooth Paste. You might want to spell it out.

Duct tape. I always bring a small roll of duct tape. If you get a hole in your canoe, or tent, or break a tent pole, you'll be glad you have it. Might work as a emergency kit for a nasty cut as well. Speaking of which, some people will bring a little super glue. In the event of a deep cut, superglue, and duct tape will do just fine.

Hide a spare car key under the frame someplace. If you're at the end of the gunflint, you might be 60 miles from the nearest locksmith. And make sure someone else in your group knows where you keep the spare. I know it's morbid, but If you don't make it out, at least they can drive home. I don't want my keys going to the bottom of the lake. I bury them somewhere in the proximity of my truck. I also hide enough gas money to get home. It's comforting to know, that if I capsize, and lose EVERYTHING, all I have to do is get back to my vehicle, and at least I can make it home. Everything else is replaceable.

Bring $20 to the landing. At the end of the gunflint trail, they charge $20 for parking for the week.

Do NOT forget the worms in the car, or even the left over pizza. Not that I've ever done that.

If you are going someplace you haven't been, at least 2 maps would be good. Always know where you are at. Always. Watch your map closely, and know where on the map you are at.

If you're bringing a dog, don't forget a small bag or six, to pick up after your dog on the portages. I would make sure your phone number is on the dog caller. Dogs have gotten lost in the bwca. They usually get found, but a phone number would be a big help.

Tie up your canoe each night. More than one group has had their canoe blow to the other end of the lake.

One guy mentioned a take home bag. We do that every trip. Clean dry clothes in the car, with a towel, soap, shampoo, and clean shoes. Then we stop somewhere for a shower. It feels amazing. In Grand Marais, there is a campground just south of town. Showers are like $4 each. Well worth it in my opinion.

Some of the outfitters will let you have an exit shower, if you rent gear from them.

I agree that a list makes things so much easier. As others have mentioned, as the trip progresses, or at the very least, when you get out, pull out the list, and make adjustments. Make notes about how many people, how many days, and how much fuel you used, how much bait you used, etc. It will help you next time.

We used to bring burgers to the Boundary waters. We always forgot the ketchup. We don't bring burgers anymore.

Put a stop on your mail. You can go to the post office, and they will have a form you can fill out, and it will stop your mail for the week.

If you have flowers, find someone to water them while you're gone.

I think my favorite part is setting my phone and email to "out of the office".... I Put a note in there for my co-workers that says "Do not attempt to contact me, I will be off the grid, and will not have cell phone access".
analyzer
distinguished member(1610)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/04/2018 12:49AM
If you have a list, and post it here, I'll be happy to look it over for you.
06/04/2018 03:39AM
VoyageurNorth: "A few wooden clothes pins. I have tried the twisting the rope to hold clothes on the line to dry, doesn't work so well. The pins hold the edges of what I hang so it dries better & doesn't fall off the line."

I have switched from clothes pins to the small plastic clips you get on bread or bagels. They are much smaller to pack and hold well on 1/4" nylon rope, not so much on paracord.
06/04/2018 03:42AM
4keys: "We always bring some paper towels, especially if we're frying fish. Very handing for wiping breading off hands, etc. I often take a small dish towel to dry dishes before packing them and the paper towel keeps that cleaner. This of coarse will depend on your menu.


If you need glasses, take a second pair.
Wet wipes.
Small bottle of purel , kept with tp and/or kitchen stuff.
Chapstick.
Travel cribbage board.
DBDs or bungee cords. Lots of uses.
A few emergency fire starters. Even without an emergency they are useful if all your wood is wet.
Common sense and a healthy respect for Mother Nature. Know your abilities and limits.


"


I always bring a medium sized bottle of Purel or hand sanitizer, it will double for the emergency fire starter as well.
06/04/2018 03:56AM
Most items you can probably get by if you forget them, but a couple of obvious items that could cut a trip short, I haven't seen mentioned yet:

Water treatment system, filter or tablets.
Food preservation, bear rope and pulley or bear barrel.

I emphatically second the duct tape, it has saved me a couple of times. If you can't fix it with duct tape, it is really broken.
IowaFishinGuy
member (23)member
 
06/04/2018 06:52AM
Thanks for the input! I will have to get my list typed up and put on here so the experts can look it over and see what I forgot haha. But yes, I was planning on some duct tape, and had seen some other posts about pool noodles for padding on the canoe. I've done about 12 fly-in fishing trips in Canada, and for the last half dozen or so I was in charge of all the planning and food menu, so that has helped me planning this, but as every trip goes, I get anxiety about forgetting something, especially with a new endeavor like canoe camping.

The best part of planning this trip has been roaming around on these messageboards, because everyone is very helpful and knowledgeable about all aspects of it.
IowaFishinGuy
member (23)member
 
06/06/2018 07:59PM
Here's my list so far:
Fishing Gear
Rod and reel 2x
Tackle box
Pliers, hook sharpener, stringer, mouth opener
Fillet knife, Sharpener, cutting board
Depth finder
Net? Leech Locker,
PFD

Cooking Gear
Stove, fuel, Matches/lighter
Pot/pan set
Bowl, cup, plate, silverware, spatula
Dish soap, wash cloth/towel
Tin foil, paper towels,
Veg Oil, 1 pint

Food
Dehydrated hash browns, 5 meals
Ova Easy Eggs, 2 meals
Oatmeal, 5 meals
Powdered soup, 1 meal
Cliff Bars, gorp, jerky?
Powdered drink mix, coffee
Fish breading, corn bread mix (Possibly)
Frozen steak, 1 potato (First Night's supper)
Frozen bacon (first breakfast)
Ketchup packets, spices/seasonings

Camp gear
Tent, sleeping bag/pad
CCS Tarp
Helinox Chair
Sunscreen, bug repellant, after bite
Sunglasses, hat, bug net
Hatchet/saw
Headlight
Extra Rope
BDB's, Bungee straps
Duct tape/zip ties
Fire starter

Clothes
Pants (2, wear one, pack one)
Shirt ( 1 long sleeve, 1 short sleeve)
Long johns, Sweatshirt/fleece jacket
Rain Suit
Gloves, Stocking hat?
Trail boots, Camp shoes
Socks (2 wool for day, 1 for night)
Undies (2)

Personal
Toothbrush/paste
Deodorant
Ibuprofen, anti itch cream
First Aid kit
TP
Reading Book

I will have a better idea on clothes when the day gets here and i have a better idea on forecast. May not need long johns, but I'm cold blooded so will probably take anyways. For food, I have a day's worth of extras between the oatmeal, eggs, and hashbrowns, but I want to have some in case I get skunked fishing. Clif Bars and Gorp for lunch, oatmeal for breakfast. I'm undecided on the cornbread yet. My fishing gear I have down pretty tight, my tackle box will weigh <2 lbs, and is small. I'm hoping I have all the camping gear I need. I will be renting a tent, sleeping bag and pad from VNO, as well as packs and food barrel. If there is any suggestions anyone has or something I'm missing, please speak up. Thank you
06/06/2018 10:29PM
Gloves, "painters" (maybe covered under extra rope), headnet, knife, spare batteries for headlamp, water filter/purification, maps, compass/GPS, hand sanitizer?

Not everybody takes the same stuff, or leaves the same things behind.


Rs130754
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
06/06/2018 10:39PM
I burn easy so sunscreen is a must have. Camera? I'm bringing a chunk of Tyek to lay down for my kitchen area. The white color will keep me from losing things. Some kind of ditch kit. I'm also taking some of grandma's old clothes pins to aid in drying items. Instead of a sharper I am bringing a small leather strop with a honing steel.
Pilgrimpaddler
member (11)member
 
06/07/2018 07:05AM
Maybe some extra ovaeasy eggs to use for your fish batter/coating?
nofish
distinguished member(2653)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/07/2018 09:29AM
Over the years I've forgotten all kinds of stuff but have always found a way to adapt to get through the trip without issue. There are however a few things that if you don't have them they could impact your trip.

1. Sunscreen - A sunburn on day 1 can really ruin the whole trip.

2. Bug spray - personally I don't use much of it but without it my wife would last about 20 minutes.

3. Toilet paper - without it you'll run out of socks real quick.

4. Matches - obvious

5. Ibuprofen - a BWCA trip is a physical adventure, someone in your group is going to get sore.

If you forget anything else I'm guessing you'll find a way to get by without it. Either adapt another item to fill the need or simply do without.

scotttimm
member (25)member
 
06/07/2018 12:46PM
On the food side, shelf-stable, precooked bacon. You can bring a few packs along, heat them up in a pan, do not need to refrigerate. Brands like Oscar Meyer can be found at Walmart or any grocery store. Another staple of ours is instant mashed potatoes (Idahoan), mixed with a pack of bacon bits and some shredded cheese, maybe some freeze-dried peas in there too. Dehydrated (instant) refried beans also make a great side dish to fish.
Have fun!
analyzer
distinguished member(1610)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/07/2018 11:06PM
scotttimm: " Another staple of ours is instant mashed potatoes (Idahoan),"

+1

We used to bring baked potatoes for our steak dinner opening night, but they take quite a while to cook, often burn on the outside, and weigh alot more than the little packets of instant mashed potatoes. We buy the Idahoan garlic mashed potatoes at cub, in the $1 isle. 10 packs for $10. The small packet (non family) uses 2 cups of boiling water, and would feed 4, as a side for fish or steak, etc.

We bring stovetop stuffing. Although I think that needs a little butter. But it's great with fish.

We often make spaghetti. It's easy, and they have some decent sauces in packets that are just add water. Spaghetti is great on a cold rainy evening.

I did not see an anchor bag on your list. You should find a mesh bag, or buy a basketball net, and tie the ends. Then when you reach camp, you can add a large rock or two, as necessary, and use it for an anchor. I think most guys on here just use a replacement basketball net. I think they are about $2 or $3.

I think I would lose the stocking cap. We'll be up the same week. I don't plan to bring one.

some guys bring a empty pillow case. Then stuff their shirts/towels, socks or whatever in them, and use it for a pillow. I would imagine, you could even put moss in a garbage bag, and then put that inside a pillow case.

I would throw in a little tape measure, and either a camera or a phone or something to take pictures. I didn't see those on your list. If you catch a nice fish, you'll wish you had some way to record it. If you don't want to bring a tape measure, then make some markings on a paddle, or in the canoe or something along that line. You'll probably want markings from 20 to 48". If you catch a trophy fish, and want to make a graphite replica, make sure to get both length and girth, and a couple good pictures for color.

I would add the leeches on the list. Or you'll possibly forget them. Be careful, we put our leeches in one of the bunkhouse fridges the night before the trip, and nearly froze them.

I think I would add permit/reservation to the list. Sometimes It's helpful to bring the confirmation. Put your necessary documents right on the list, and go over them pre-trip. Does everyone have their fishing license, DL, wallet, ... if going into canada, do they have their RABC, passport, etc. If going into Canada, ask ahead of time if anyone has a felony or DUI.

Some guys bring binoculars. Depends on the amount of portaging you're doing. It can be nice for wildlife viewing, and even trying to find a campsite.

I didn't see a compass on your list. Maybe you plan to use gps or something? I didn't see where you were going, but many areas, a compass comes in handy.

There are those that would recommend a whistle. If you go off exploring in the woods, you should consider bringing a whistle and compass with you.

I would put maps on your list. If its on the list, you're less likely to forget it.

In terms of rope, you'll need some for each canoes anchor bag. Another to haul food pack up the tree, if you go that route. You may need it for your tarp, and clothes line??

I think I read the number one reason for an emergency air evacuation, is an accident with a hatchet. I've learned to get by without.

I would put paddles on the list. You wouldn't be the first one to forget them. It's nice to have more than one lighter or set of matches, separated, in case one gets lost or stolen.

We always throw a big sponge in the back of each canoe. It's kinda nice to sponge out the water.

Try not to laugh, but when we base camp, we actually bring a little collapsible flyswatter. It's so much easier than trying to use my hands. We use it in the tent, the screen tent, and in the canoe. I know....

I don't like to wear sunglasses, as I like to see the true colors. But many wouldn't leave home without them. My wife has blue eyes, and they are sensitive to sunlight. She would get a headache if she didn't have them with.

Sunglasses are also recommended when fishing. It might save a hook in the eye.

I didn't see a baseball cap, or some sort of hat. a brimmed hat, can also deter an errant fish hook. As well as keep the sun off your face and neck.

Put "Readers/glasses" right on the list. Even if you don't use them, someone else in your group may, and the reminder is nice.

I use the list to check stuff off as I pull it and put it in the vehicle/trailer. But then I go over that list again, with the entire group, just to see if it triggers anything for anyone.

If you have girls, I would go so far as to put tampons, or whatever politically correct term you want to use, right on the list.

Meds? Does anyone in your group need daily meds? You may want to ask, just to spark their memory. Ask about any severe alergies, especially to bees, or peanuts if you have them in the gorp. It's probably a bad time to find out now, but I have had people mention food alergies ON THE WAY UP. IT's a bad time to find out someone can't have gluten. Does anyone need an inhaler?

Vehicle maintenance. Check your tires, and the ones on the trailer. Check the oil, or change it as necessary. We lost an engine once, because I failed to check the coolant level. But it was only $2,700, so no big deal.... : (~ Not to mention it's very inconvenient to have that happen on the way up the gunflint trail, with a car full of people... but that's another story. Make sure you have a good spare tire, (besides the one around your waste), a jack, and a tire iron that fits the lug nuts... learned that last one the hard way, on a borrowed trailer.

Work related stuff... put your email on "out of office"or whatever, set your voicemail, set your thermostat, stop your mail. Have someone water your plants. Have someone sit your dog.

If you're bringing the dog. dog food. leash. collar. phone number on dog collar. throw rug for the dog is nice. crappy towel for the car ride home comes in handy.

We pack a take home bag, with fresh set of clothes, shoes, toiletries,towel,jacket maybe,and then shower at an outfitter, or campground on the way out. In grandmarais there is a campground just south of town. Showers are about $4 each, and feel wonderful.

When I'm base camping, I like to bring a couple two QT coolers to mix beverages in. But I wouldn't bring them for portaging.

Lighted bobbers are fun.

Cushions for the canoe?
Seat backs/crazy creeks or whatever?

You can play backgammon in the dirt, with pine cones, and only really need a pair of dice.

You can have a fair amount of fun with a few steel tip darts, and small pine cones set up on a log or stump for a target.

We always bring a deck of cards, and a little pad of paper/pencil for scorekeeping.

I didn't see a collapsible water jug. You don't have to have one, but just in case you intended to bring one.

Minnow trap?

Batteries for your depth finder?

Sorry for running on and on and on and on and on....

: )~















minnmike
member (15)member
 
06/08/2018 12:47AM
I do bring paper towels and I do fold them and put into a ziploc. I usually pack 2 for each day for supper meals when my wife and I go. Wipe your face and hands then the pan or cup out and burn in the fire, ready made fire starter. 90% of your clean up is done and no food residue in your camp. great way to have an animal free camp site. Especially helpful when frying fish. I strain most of my oil through small piece of cheese cloth in a funnel back into oil bottle then wipe your pan with an extra couple paper towels and it's a ready to use fire starter. Burn oil and fry residue soaked cheese cloth too. I like to have a fire, especially shoulder seasons each night and it really helps keep camp clean. 20 or so of the newer half sheet paper towels in a ziploc for a 8-10 day trip for 2 people, I find really takes up no space or adds any more than a few ounces. Also if you don't need for meals and clean up, they can be used as butt wipe or extra bandage.
minnmike
member (15)member
 
06/08/2018 01:51AM
Also in response to your packing list it looks like mine, except in mid June I don't bring long johns and I don't bring a head net because I don't bring deodorant. Unscented wet wipes or a swim and maybe some Deet work great for me. If there is a mosquito frenzy when it gets dark, we play cribbage in the tent for an hour and/or read, journal. If we aren't dead tired by then the bugs are usually pretty manageable by then.
BuckFlicks
distinguished member(520)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/08/2018 12:40PM
Some things I didn't see on your list... I'm writing this as I peruse your list so I might be repeating some stuff others have said:

-Didn't see anything about water preparation... filter, purifier, dromedary bladder, nalgene bottles, etc. I prefer two sources of water treatment and more bottles than I think I need. I've seen more than one Nalgene bottle roll down a cliff never to be seen again. You can store stuff in your reserve bottle that you want to keep dry to save pack space.

-Batteries for your various devices. If your head lamp is an LED, you should be good with a fresh set, but you don't ever want to not have it. I also carry an auxiliary backup flashlight. I also didn't see a camera on your list and you will most assuredly want to take pics.

- Purell: Good to scrub the grubbies off your hands before eating lunch, or taking your contacts out. Also works well as a fire starter in a pinch.
- I like bicycle gloves with pads on the palm, but with the fingers cut off.
- Paper Towels are useful, but I also always take 2 of these. One for face and hands, and one for drying clean dishes: Packtowl

- you mentioned a knit cap for warmth at night I assume - which you may want if you get cold at night. I usually prefer to sleep with a cap on than to use the hood in my sleeping bag - I like to use the hood to stuff my jacket and other clothes into to make a pillow.

You'll definitely want some sort of sun hat or at least a baseball cap to keep the sun out of your eyes. The sun is brutal on the water if the weather is clear. You get rays from above and below. Along those lines, sunglasses are a must. I prefer polarized because the glare on the water is blinding at times. You can get cheap but good quality polarized sunglasses that also float from places that sell fishing gear. That way you won't be mad if you lose them.

- don't rely on fish for your meals. I'd recommend taking a couple freeze-dried meals for dinner in case you don't catch anything. They weigh next to nothing and if you don't use them, they'll keep darn near forever. Chances are pretty good you won't need them, but to quote the great Woodrow F. Call, "Better to have this and not need it than to need it and not have it."

- You'll definitely need a compass and maps and maybe a GPS. It may look obvious on the map, but some lakes have islands that aren't marked on the map and you think you're passing an island that you had landmarked as a navigation point and it's actually not on your map and you're thrown off.

- waterproof journal and a mechanical pencil. This is great not only to jot down what happened on your day so you don't lose the details in post-trip fog, but it's also great to serve the very purpose that this thread serves - to help you refine your packing list... every night before I go to sleep, I write down what we did, what I liked and didn't like about the day's travels/activities, any problems we had and how we overcame them, and then just my general thoughts, which tend to get pretty philosophical in the outdoors. Then I go to the back page of the journal and record any gear breakages/failures and how I coped with it so I know what to replace, and to remember how to deal with the same problem in the future. I document the condition and performance of all my gear each trip. It's easy to look over your gear before a trip to see if it's still in good shape, but you really don't know until you're using it. Mark down any structural or superficial issues that need to be addressed later (repair or replace.) I also review stuff like varieties of Cliff Bars and freeze dried meals... ones I like and would definitely get again, ones I don't care for. Also when I think of something mid-trip that I wish I had brought and never thought before or simply forgot to pack. Or if I have an idea mid-trip like, "This pot is great, but it would be really cool if it had this kind of handle"... then I know how to start a web search for a new pot next time I'm buying gear. When I'm hiking, I record where I might have gotten blisters so I know to pre-treat that area the next trip. It's a great reminder to go back and re-read your journal a few weeks after the trip to start thinking about what changes you want to make to your gear list. I know when I get home from a trip, I don't want anything to do with my gear for several days and I'll only unpack stuff that needs to dry out and leave the rest for later.

I think someone mentioned a post-trip kit. We always set up a clean set of clothes, comfy shoes, and these, which I also take on the trip to de-funk:
Buttwipes We usually hoof it back to Duluth and check in to a hotel before we get a shower, but this will save us from funking up the car and offending anyone at the convenience store we stop at for the mandatory post-trail Coke.
IowaFishinGuy
member (23)member
 
06/12/2018 09:19AM
Thanks everybody.
A couple things you guys mentioned that I did not put on the list, such as compass, baseball hat, map, sunglasses, cell phone for taking pictures...planned on bringing them, just didn't include them on list. Probably should, or I'll forget haha.

I am still unsure about water filter bag/filter straw. On my fly-ins in Canada, we always just drank water straight from the lake an had no issues, but maybe I should err on the side of caution and get a filter for my nalgene bottle. Wouldn't cost a lot of money compared to a ruined trip.

Anchor bag: Another item I planned on bringing, but glad you mentioned it. Rope for anchor bag, as well as painters, and rope for clothes line and spare. Will probably have a hundred foot of extra rope when it's all said and done haha.

I'm very cold blooded, so I will bring the stocking cap. Long john's, I will keep an eye on the forecast and if it looks warm for the week the day I depart, will leave them out.
DontPanic
member (44)member
 
06/13/2018 11:21AM
DrBobDg: "CHAPSTICK>>>
you won't believe how dry the lips might get.
Living in dairy country I take a bunch of those single use paper towels....the same kind you see in dispensers in some commercial bathroooms.
I put a good handful in a zip lock bag.
2 gallon ziplock bags are real handy as well for stuff.
steel scrubbing pad is handy.


they first trip has a steep learning curve. Take good notes for the next one and develop a list.


"


+1
Quetico warrior
Guest Paddler
 
06/16/2018 09:02AM
Wet naps small bottles of 100% deet odor free deorderant helps w bugs bug hat great attitude u get from it what u put in
06/16/2018 02:13PM
Screenhouse
LindenTree3
distinguished member(2299)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/16/2018 03:22PM
I just finished packing for my week solo into Cherokee Lake.

Made a list and weighed my gear this time including food.
All my gear minus canoe, dith kit, Life Jacket and two paddles weigh in at 37#'s.

My tent is 6.25 pounds so I know how to easily shave off a couple pounds if I want to spend the money. I double portage.
analyzer
distinguished member(1610)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/16/2018 03:58PM
walllee: "Screenhouse "

we started bringing one base camping. I have to admit, it's really nice.
IowaFishinGuy
member (23)member
 
06/16/2018 09:13PM
LindenTree3: "I just finished packing for my week solo into Cherokee Lake.


Made a list and weighed my gear this time including food.
All my gear minus canoe, dith kit, Life Jacket and two paddles weigh in at 37#'s.


My tent is 6.25 pounds so I know how to easily shave off a couple pounds if I want to spend the money. I double portage."


That sounds pretty good. I weighed mine and I'm at 48. I will bring it all up to VNO tomorrow and have them look over my gear to see what they think I can leave out. As of now, long johns are included, but the forecast keeps looking better for this week, so they will probably get left in the truck
06/17/2018 05:57AM
48 is not that bad, either, especially with fishing gear - does that include the food weight, too?
chessie
senior member (62)senior membersenior member
 
06/17/2018 07:32AM
I believe it is illegal to burn anything other than tinder/wood in the BWCA, so no paper towel burning. The newly released book, Gunflint Burning, is instructive. The gentleman who started that catastrophic Ham Lake fire was burning some newspaper in his firepit. Pack it in, pack it out~!
Have a great trip!
 
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