Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Gear Forum
      Vehicle Canoe Mounting - Front Straps     
 Forum Sponsor

Author

Text

gopher2307
distinguished member (107)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/25/2018 05:04PM
Does anyone go without the front straps when mounting a canoe on a vehicle? How do you do it and still feel comfortable at 70 mph?

I'm looking at a new SUV. Oddly, I don't see any hooks or metal holes under the front end for attaching straps that would allow me to strap down the front end of my roof mounted canoe(s). I don't have a trailer for a canoe, nor do I have interest in getting one.

If it makes any difference, I'm looking at a VW Atlas which does have roof rails. I've asked the dealer this question, but I trust this audience's opinion better.

Thanks much!
 
Reply    Reply with Quote    Print Top Bottom Previous Next
08/25/2018 06:08PM
Originally, I had a Jeep Cherokee. I took an old ratchet strap and cut 2 pieces of strap about 1 ft. long. I found a screw under the hood on each side of the vehicle, near the radiator and attached the straps to the metal framing, in the shape of a loop, with each of the screws. When hauling my canoe, I reach into the engine compartment and pull out the 2 loops and tie off the canoe to the loops.

Now I have a Ford Escape and fastened the loops in the area of the hood hinges. Every place else is all plastic.

If you can't find any sturdy enough metal to screw into, you could use a pair of these gadgets. Just sit the tubes inside the engine compartment and close the hood.


Link
OCDave
distinguished member (220)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/25/2018 06:20PM
No front straps around town but, certainly wouldn't drive north without them. There are plenty of options under your hood, even a VW, that provide front strap connection points. Swing by your local canoe vendor and they will provide the solution you seek.

08/25/2018 06:27PM

I have used these things called “Top Ties” on all my vehicles. They are a nylon strap with a grommet. You remove a bolt the holds the fender on, insert Top Tie and reinsert bolt. They tuck inside hood when not in use. I got mine at Red Rock Wilderness Store in Ely.
andym
distinguished member(4461)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/25/2018 06:47PM
I use the same thing as Zulu although it could be a different brand. I actually like them better than tying to something underneath because the ropes are shorter and go to both sides. I have also used the ones with tubes. They are good too.
RTurner
member (38)member
 
08/25/2018 07:14PM
I use the straps screwed in under the hood, and my brother in law uses the Thule quick loop straps... both work quite well. Also, not sure about your car, but in the front of my RAV4, there are little cutouts in the bumper... you pop those out, and there's a threaded section into which you can screw an eye bolt which can be used to tow the car. Makes a great tie off point for a boat. Just make sure you don't bang your knee on the eye bolt. Hurts more than a little. :(
em8260
senior member (97)senior membersenior member
 
08/25/2018 07:15PM
awbrown: "Originally, I had a Jeep Cherokee. I took an old ratchet strap and cut 2 pieces of strap about 1 ft. long. I found a screw under the hood on each side of the vehicle, near the radiator and attached the straps to the metal framing, in the shape of a loop, with each of the screws. When hauling my canoe, I reach into the engine compartment and pull out the 2 loops and tie off the canoe to the loops."
I did exactly what he did to my Toyota 4Runner.
08/25/2018 08:25PM
andym: "I use the same thing as Zulu although it could be a different brand. I actually like them better than tying to something underneath because the ropes are shorter and go to both sides. I have also used the ones with tubes. They are good too. "

My outfitter uses the ones with tube. These simple solutions are all you need.
pswith5
distinguished member(3405)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/25/2018 09:07PM
I think they are Malone brand? Bass Pro and FleetFarm have them, I believe.
Othello
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
08/25/2018 09:36PM
I've got the same ones as Zulu, on all my vehicles, as well. Just to protect the paint, I have started putting duct tape on the edges of the hood where the straps touch and could potentially rub. Works like a charm.
andym
distinguished member(4461)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/25/2018 10:18PM
I think that there are a bunch of brands also including Seattle Sports and Spring Creek.

The tube ones are great for occasional use such as an outfitter setting up someone to rent a canoe and transport it themselves. For my own vehicle, I prefer the screw in because the load is transferred to the screw instead of the hood latch. But that may be a point of zero actual importance. I’ve driven hundreds of miles with the tube ones.
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13269)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
08/25/2018 11:09PM
Go to any fabric store and buy some 1” polyester strap. Cut to size and use a nail that you heat with a torch to burn a hole in the straps. Remove a bolt inside the hood area and inset the bolt back into the same hole with a flat washer. Very cheap to make and will last.
jhb8426
distinguished member(732)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/26/2018 12:18AM
I use these. Seattle Sports Quick Loops under the hood.
bwcadan
distinguished member(1290)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/26/2018 06:16AM
I attach my front strap through a loop which is attached (looped through itself) around each hood arm. Then close hood with the loop you want to attach your strap through outside of closed hood. My loops came from a mattress company and stay in place until the caravan is sold/traded. When not transporting the canoe, just put the actual loop which is outside the motor compartment under the hood until the next year. No problem for over 10 years, although I check its condition annually. No drilling and am comfortable at 70 plus mph even against storm winds. With a rear strap looped through the tail gate latch and 2 across the top, the canoe is virtually motionless for the trip to and from St. Louis. I use electrical ty raps to cinch all straps which makes for a extremely tight ride for the canoe.

Be sure to take pliers or knife to carefully remove the ty raps. Take an extra strap just in case.

I would never travel with less than 4 straps to keep the canoe stable at speed or any sudden stops or starts.
jdmccurry
member (37)member
 
08/26/2018 07:42AM
I’ve been using the Thule version of these hood loop straps for decades. They work great.
Hood loop straps at REI
08/26/2018 09:02AM
I use the same ones as Zulu
joetrain
distinguished member(804)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/26/2018 10:31AM
I tie about a 1 foot section of rope to itself then place it where the hood latches and shut the hood on it. The front of the boat is secured with only one line tied to that center point. I leave it on my car all the time.

I used to use the under the hood straps on both sides but I didn’t like the tie line in my vision.

~JOE~
andym
distinguished member(4461)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/26/2018 10:47PM
There’s no drilling to install the straps with grommets. You just use an existing screw, take it out, put the strap in place, and put the screw back in.

Cool to see the range of things people are doing. I’ll keep those in mind.
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(880)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/27/2018 06:52AM
I've never used a front strap. Or a rear strap. Two straps across the canoe body near the seats is all I have used. Ratchet tight until the Kevlar cracks a little and you are good to go.
billconner
distinguished member(6817)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/27/2018 07:23AM
" "

+1 to Zulu and others (but posting to try to fix the font)
Jackfish
Moderator
 
08/27/2018 07:55AM
bobbernumber3: "I've never used a front strap. Or a rear strap. Two straps across the canoe body near the seats is all I have used. Ratchet tight until the Kevlar cracks a little and you are good to go."
Depends on how far apart your racks are. "Two straps across the body NEAR THE SEATS" is the key.

If the straps are far enough apart, there's no need for the front or back tie-downs, but if they're only 3-5 feet apart, you better have some extra tie-downs or the canoe(s) won't have any stability on the roof.

I have a Dodge Grand Caravan and use the Spring Creek suction cup rack system. Straps go through the front door opening and the back venting windows. The racks are far enough apart where I don't need front or back tie-downs. Rock solid at 70+ mph.
KarlBAndersen1
distinguished member(932)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/27/2018 02:00PM
To drive down the road without the bow and stern secured - regardless of how far apart the rack bars are - is asking for trouble.
To do so would not even cross my mind. That leaves me dumbfounded.

Self explanatory:







Jackfish
Moderator
 
08/27/2018 02:12PM
KarlBAndersen1: "To drive down the road without the bow and stern secured - regardless of how far apart the rack bars are - is asking for trouble.
To do so would not even cross my mind. That leaves me dumbfounded. "

Don't be dumbfounded, Karl. Think it through.

Imagine a 17' canoe that is secured to racks spaced 10' apart. You align your canoe on the racks so 3' is ahead of the front rack and 4' is behind the back rack, then you strap the canoes to the racks with heavy-duty cam straps. That canoe isn't going anywhere, and we've been carrying two canoes that way for maybe 20 years or more. I can assure you, they don't even wiggle, even in gusts of wind. Round-trip for us is about 1,200 miles.

As I mentioned above, if the racks were closer together, front (and probably back) anchor straps would be necessary. They're not in our situation.
andym
distinguished member(4461)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/27/2018 04:38PM
Canoes on trailers are generally just held down with two straps but the spacing is larger than on most roofs. On the other hand, the trailers are in the wind shadow of the vehicle. I might still be tempted just to throw on a bow line just for safety just as a trailer hitch should have a couple of safety chains.
KarlBAndersen1
distinguished member(932)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/27/2018 05:07PM
Jackfish: "KarlBAndersen1: "To drive down the road without the bow and stern secured - regardless of how far apart the rack bars are - is asking for trouble.
To do so would not even cross my mind. That leaves me dumbfounded. "

Don't be dumbfounded, Karl. Think it through.

Imagine a 17' canoe that is secured to racks spaced 10' apart. You align your canoe on the racks so 3' is ahead of the front rack and 4' is behind the back rack, then you strap the canoes to the racks with heavy-duty cam straps. That canoe isn't going anywhere, and we've been carrying two canoes that way for maybe 20 years or more. I can assure you, they don't even wiggle, even in gusts of wind. Round-trip for us is about 1,200 miles.

As I mentioned above, if the racks were closer together, front (and probably back) anchor straps would be necessary. They're not in our situation. "



C'mon - he's talking about on an SUV. How are you going to get rails 10 feet apart? I've got simple math pretty well figured out.
Think it through.
thlipsis29
distinguished member(1164)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/27/2018 06:31PM
Use the same straps that Zulu uses. Bolted them under the hood on my Toyota Sienna and they held a 23' MN IV perfectly at 70+ mph. I used a cotton ball on each side to prevent the nylon from scratching the paint.
billconner
distinguished member(6817)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/27/2018 06:51PM
Yeah. My bars on the RAV4 and now Outback are not 4' apart. Wouldn't think of not ting bow and stern down.
Oneofmanyblessings
senior member (62)senior membersenior member
 
08/27/2018 09:32PM
what kind of vehicle do you have?
i have the extended expedition and they are no where near 10 feet
gopher2307
distinguished member (107)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/27/2018 10:08PM
Thanks for the thoughts everyone. Have what I need to figure it out from here.

I must add...I've posted a dozen or things on this site. I've heard crickets on one or two topics. Never in my mind did I think I'd get 27+ responses, albeit 5 or so were bickering about how to tie canoe down without front straps on a dodge caravan.

Thanks again! On with the caravan!
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(880)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
08/28/2018 06:26AM
gopher2307: ".... I must add...I've posted a dozen or things on this site. I've heard crickets on one or two topics. Never in my mind did I think I'd get 27+ responses......"
It's funny. Some posts take off like dry tinder. Others sit like a fire in the rain.
andym
distinguished member(4461)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
08/28/2018 11:39AM
Guns, guitars, and bow straps on cars. That’s pretty much the big three if you want to get a debate going. Now, you could shoot a whole through your hood and wire the canoe to it with guitar strings.....
08/28/2018 12:38PM
Well, if you don't put a twist in the straps they'll start to sing like guitar strings...

I previously made my own, then found it more convenient to buy the premade Seattle Sports hood loops from REI. I also bought a set of 4 of the loops on the plastic tube for setting up others who don't have permanent tie down points on their vehicle and I also use them on my Prius V for the rear tie downs.
bkebs
senior member (75)senior membersenior member
 
08/29/2018 07:34AM
On my Honda Fit, I can only get a little spread between the bars and there is nothing to attach to under the front. I popped the hood and tied some cordage loops to a couple of beefy screws. When I transport a canoe, I just lift the hood and pull the loops out to tie off to. I don"t always do it for short trips, but I am getting on the highway, I like 4 points of contact.

Some States require 3 points. I never knew this until I went to a outdoor trade show a few years ago and spoke with some Livery outfitters that have to throw a big strap over their load to avoid getting in trouble.
joewildlife
distinguished member (318)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/24/2018 07:49PM


These are half of "soft straps" I got in a big box store, used to loop over the handlebars of motorcycles and then ratchet down. So I cut each in half, giving me 4 straps for 2 vehicles. This pic is either on a Subaru outback or a Honda CRV, I don't remember.

The most damage I've ever had to a canoe when on the road...is when I hit an owl on the bow line at 70mph. It tore the front handle off the texas safari canoe. The rope ratchet I use for going to hood to bow bounced off the hood and caused a few good dings. The blood and feathers on the windshield was quite a surprise.

Now, I know of two folks who destroyed their kayaks by using long bow lines to under the bumper. when the lines come off, they go under the tire and kiss your boat goodbye. Use short lines to the hood instead!

Joe
Guest Paddler
 
10/09/2018 08:49PM
I’ve never used front straps on a Ford Explorer and Toyota Highlander. 3 trips per year from the Twin Cities for 20 years and probably 25 trips from Duluth before that. I put 2 straps over the top AND a short rope tied from the front canoe cross-brace to the side rail on the car. That limits the wiggle in the front.

Once I get it tightened down it doesn’t move at all with canoe straps. Also, I place the canoe where it balances on its own, so it sets further back on the vehicle. It doesn’t quite reach even with the front of the hood. 18.5’ Souris River.
TrekScouter
distinguished member (392)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/09/2018 10:26PM
Front and rear lines aren’t so much for keeping the canoe secure on the rack. They ensure that excessive force won’t separate your rack from the vehicle.
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5519)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/10/2018 11:41PM
TrekScouter: "Front and rear lines aren’t so much for keeping the canoe secure on the rack. They ensure that excessive force won’t separate your rack from the vehicle."

And keep from killing or injuring someone behind you. Racks break. Straps break. Driving without the front secured to something other than your rack is dangerous to others, pure and simple.
A1t2o
distinguished member(658)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 10:59AM
TrekScouter: "Front and rear lines aren’t so much for keeping the canoe secure on the rack. They ensure that excessive force won’t separate your rack from the vehicle."

I always thought the straps around the rack were to hold the canoe down and the bow/stern straps were to keep it from moving around or shifting during transit. As in the center straps will hold it vertically and horizontally, but the bow/stern straps hold it against any twist and prevent any shifting forward and backward.
TrekScouter
distinguished member (392)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 01:49PM
A1t2o: "TrekScouter: "Front and rear lines aren’t so much for keeping the canoe secure on the rack. They ensure that excessive force won’t separate your rack from the vehicle."

I always thought the straps around the rack were to hold the canoe down and the bow/stern straps were to keep it from moving around or shifting during transit. As in the center straps will hold it vertically and horizontally, but the bow/stern straps hold it against any twist and prevent any shifting forward and backward."


Good points. Thanks for allowing me to clarify. It's true that bow and stern lines help keep the canoe from shifting and wiggling on the bars. Ultimately though, the purpose of the lines and straps is to keep the canoe on the vehicle.

My point is simply that, depending on the strength of your roof, the rack's mounting system, and how far apart the bars are spaced, if you only strap the canoe to the rack, you may still be at risk of the rack being torn from the vehicle in rough conditions at highway speed.
PowerLizard
member (31)member
 
10/11/2018 07:17PM
The front ties downs are like safety chains on trailer. The chains keep the trailer attached to the vehicle if something goes wrong with the hitch connection. The front tie downs keep the canoe on top of the vehicle if something goes wrong with the rack or tie downs.

I have been in an incident where the two safety chains kept a pop-up camper trailer attached to my vehicle as designed. My sister, who did not believe front tie downs were necessary, lost an expensive carbon fiber sea kayak at highway speeds. Luckily no one was injured.
10/11/2018 08:13PM
billconner: "Yeah. My bars on the RAV4 and now Outback are not 4' apart. Wouldn't think of not tying bow and stern down."

Our '04 Outback had great front tie-out anchors under each fog lamp, and our use of Yakima Lowrider brackets on the factory Subaru rails let us get the load bars pretty far apart. Our newer Outback has folding load bars that disappear nicely into the roof rails for lower drag when not carrying a load, but are only 30" (center to center) apart when in the cross-roof position. Two straps across the roof over those closely-spaced load bars just aren't enough, and we've found no option for increasing distance between load bars. We've also struggled to find a good anchor near the bumper, and had settled on a strap around a stamped steel bracket just in front of the radiator. Thanks to everyone who pictured variations of straps anchored under the hood and pulled out to secure the bow lines--we tried this last week going to a local lake, and had no movement of the bow. Running a line from each side of the bow to an under-hood anchor strap made the canoe much more stable than running almost-parallel lines to the radiator bracket/strap, and is really noticeable when passing trucks at interstate speeds.
TZ
GeoFisher
distinguished member(2732)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 09:58PM
awbrown: "Originally, I had a Jeep Cherokee. I took an old ratchet strap and cut 2 pieces of strap about 1 ft. long. I found a screw under the hood on each side of the vehicle, near the radiator and attached the straps to the metal framing, in the shape of a loop, with each of the screws. When hauling my canoe, I reach into the engine compartment and pull out the 2 loops and tie off the canoe to the loops.


Now I have a Ford Escape and fastened the loops in the area of the hood hinges. Every place else is all plastic.

If you can't find any sturdy enough metal to screw into, you could use a pair of these gadgets. Just sit the tubes inside the engine compartment and close the hood.



Link "


I remember you describing this years ago when I purchased my first canoe.....I did the same thing. I found a good panel screw, took it out, put the strap and a big washer back..PRESTO change......Magic.

On some other vehicles, I've actually drilled a new hole, and put in a heavier bolt....Works GREAT.
billconner
distinguished member(6817)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/12/2018 05:02AM
"Our newer Outback has folding load bars that disappear nicely into the roof rails for lower drag when not carrying a load, but are only 30" (center to center) apart when in the cross-roof position."

I discovered these can be spread further apart. The tool is under the cover for the spare. I love the outback but this was not intuitive, at least for me.
bwcasolo
distinguished member(1673)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 05:35AM
Zulu: "
I have used these things called “Top Ties” on all my vehicles. They are a nylon strap with a grommet. You remove a bolt the holds the fender on, insert Top Tie and reinsert bolt. They tuck inside hood when not in use. I got mine at Red Rock Wilderness Store in Ely. "

yep, same here!
ChazzTheGnome
distinguished member(624)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 02:58PM
bwcasolo: "Zulu: "
I have used these things called “Top Ties” on all my vehicles. They are a nylon strap with a grommet. You remove a bolt the holds the fender on, insert Top Tie and reinsert bolt. They tuck inside hood when not in use. I got mine at Red Rock Wilderness Store in Ely. "

yep, same here!"



+1 on these but i got my set at midwest in minneapolis. works like a charm.
TrekScouter
distinguished member (392)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 03:23PM
Search for "Hood Strap Loops" on Amazon or eBay. Plenty to choose from for under $8 a pair, delivered.
joewildlife
distinguished member (318)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 06:23PM
Yes, front and rear tire downs are both to stabilize the boats, but also keep them on the vehicle if the roof rack fails. I know somebody whose entire rack with two boats on it lifted off the vehicles and skidded down the highway...

joewildlife
distinguished member (318)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 06:23PM


joewildlife
distinguished member (318)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 06:23PM

10/12/2018 08:02PM
billconner: " "Our newer Outback has folding load bars that disappear nicely into the roof rails for lower drag when not carrying a load, but are only 30" (center to center) apart when in the cross-roof position."


I discovered these can be spread further apart. The tool is under the cover for the spare. I love the outback but this was not intuitive, at least for me."


I think the adjustable rear load bar feature started with the 2015 Outback--our 2011 only allows the 30" center to center placement, and the roof rails don't accommodate aftermarket load bars... Maybe our next (I'm on my tenth!) Suby's rack system will be more easily modified.

TZ
10/15/2018 01:26PM
I don't use any front straps because they were rubbing on my hood. I double-up my straps on the roof. So far I've had no problem driving 75mph.
schweady
distinguished member(6753)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/15/2018 04:39PM
egknuti: "I don't use any front straps because they were rubbing on my hood..."
I thought that was a major selling point of the aforementioned hood strap loops.
10/15/2018 05:09PM
schweady: "egknuti: "I don't use any front straps because they were rubbing on my hood..."
I thought that was a major selling point of the aforementioned hood strap loops.
"

My car is not equipped with hood straps. Instead, I would have to run the straps underneath the front bumper.
andym
distinguished member(4461)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/15/2018 08:08PM
Your car doesn't need to have hood straps you can add them or use the ones that go in an out with the tubes such as these from Seattle Sports.
riverrunner
distinguished member(1730)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/16/2018 05:36AM
Two straps in the front two over the top one or two in the back.

I never lost a canoe in 50 plus years and don't plan too.

One just has to look at where the forces come from when traveling down the highway.

To realize that front straps are important.

I use hood straps also or just run the front straps to the front tow hooks if your vehicle has them.

10/16/2018 12:48PM
andym: "Your car doesn't need to have hood straps you can add them or use the ones that go in an out with the tubes such as these from Seattle Sports. "
I'll check these out. Thanks.


joewildlife
distinguished member (318)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/16/2018 01:26PM
Running bow lines long enough to get under the front bumper or to tow hooks might be long enough to get under the tires if they ever come loose. That is a proven way to destroy boats.
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5519)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/16/2018 11:23PM
riverrunner: "Two straps in the front two over the top one or two in the back.


I never lost a canoe in 50 plus years and don't plan too.


One just has to look at where the forces come from when traveling down the highway.


To realize that front straps are important.


I use hood straps also or just run the front straps to the front tow hooks if your vehicle has them.


"


well, a person can play "Russian Roulette" without getting shot too, but it does not make it a good idea.
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5519)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/16/2018 11:25PM
joewildlife: "Running bow lines long enough to get under the front bumper or to tow hooks might be long enough to get under the tires if they ever come loose. That is a proven way to destroy boats."

Heheheh, did I tell you about the time I did that accidentally playing "Dukes of Hazard" chasing a coyote through a field forgetting about a big dip? Broke the rack, strap wrapped around front passenger tire, and my Souris Quetico 16 slammed into the roof of my '97 RAV4! I was lucky I only damaged a rack and the car! The coyote, BTW, got away (LOL)!
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5519)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/16/2018 11:25PM

BWPaddler
distinguished member(9405)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/19/2018 09:59AM
ozarkpaddler: "joewildlife: "Running bow lines long enough to get under the front bumper or to tow hooks might be long enough to get under the tires if they ever come loose. That is a proven way to destroy boats."


Heheheh, did I tell you about the time I did that accidentally playing "Dukes of Hazard" chasing a coyote through a field forgetting about a big dip? Broke the rack, strap wrapped around front passenger tire, and my Souris Quetico 16 slammed into the roof of my '97 RAV4! I was lucky I only damaged a rack and the car! The coyote, BTW, got away (LOL)!
"


I would pay good money for a video of that!
ozarkpaddler
distinguished member(5519)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/19/2018 05:29PM
BWPaddler: "ozarkpaddler: "joewildlife: "Running bow lines long enough to get under the front bumper or to tow hooks might be long enough to get under the tires if they ever come loose. That is a proven way to destroy boats."



Heheheh, did I tell you about the time I did that accidentally playing "Dukes of Hazard" chasing a coyote through a field forgetting about a big dip? Broke the rack, strap wrapped around front passenger tire, and my Souris Quetico 16 slammed into the roof of my '97 RAV4! I was lucky I only damaged a rack and the car! The coyote, BTW, got away (LOL)!
"



I would pay good money for a video of that!"


I wish there WAS a video of that; I am VERY careful when driving through that particular field now (LOL)!
 
Reply    Reply with Quote    Print Top Bottom Previous Next