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doubledown
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
10/08/2018 08:32PM
I’ve read a lot online about bushcrafters’ preference of folding saws, but I want to purchase my saw specifically with canoe tripping in mind. I’m a ‘buy once, cry once’ guy so I’m not in the market for the dollar tree folding saw. Thanks in advance for suggestions based on experience.
 
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Tomcat
member (16)member
 
10/08/2018 08:57PM
SinglePortage
distinguished member (143)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/08/2018 09:58PM
The Boreal 21 is a great little bow saw at 1 pound 2oz. By other favorite is the Silky F180 folding saw at 5.6oz. If my trip is in cooler weather where I expect to want warming fires I take the Boreal 21. For warm weather trips I bring the Silky. The Silky is so nice to carry and use, it is tough to beat. If I could only buy one it would be the Silky. You can cut a lot of wood in short order with that little saw.

The Boreal 21 is about $65 and Silky is $30.
THEGrandRapids
member (50)member
 
10/08/2018 10:45PM
Bob Dustrude 30”- plenty of length for solo and tandem use and has a deep enough throat that it won’t limit you half way down the blade or halfway through a cut.

Boreal saw looks nice too. I prefer the symmetrical Bob.

Most important piece of ANY saw is a SHARP blade. Every sharp saw will outperform every dull saw no matter the brand.
unshavenman
distinguished member(1057)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/08/2018 10:48PM
Tomcat: "Boreal 21 "
+1
Birdknowsbest
distinguished member (245)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/09/2018 12:00AM
Silky BigBoy 2000

15 ounces
AmarilloJim
distinguished member(1372)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/09/2018 07:50AM
I know it's not a folding but we love this one.

Our scouts did a side by side comparison with a Sven, a Silky and others. This one was everyone's favorite.
THEGrandRapids
member (50)member
 
10/09/2018 09:02AM
I forgot- I also have a Zippo 4 in 1. Not a bad combo saw/ ax/ hammer/ stake puller. I leave it in my car for emergency, car camping, etc. I brought it once in the BWCA, but just didn't like it. It you are trying to saw something that is thicker than 2" then you really get limited with this design. I also didn't trust the ax enough to use the log-strike-split technique with it. I don't hate it, but I'd buy something else before this again.
10/09/2018 10:01AM
Corona pruning saw, 20 bucks at Amazon. I have several saws and they're all good, this is the only one I use anymore. Cuts on the pull stroke so you won't bind the blade, folds up like a pocket knife.
thebotanyguy
distinguished member(768)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/09/2018 03:04PM
maxxbhp: " Corona pruning saw, 20 bucks at Amazon. I have several saws and they're all good, this is the only one I use anymore. Cuts on the pull stroke so you won't bind the blade, folds up like a pocket knife."

I also own this saw, and I really like it for pruning jobs around the yard. However, there is one caveat that should be noted. When the saw is folded, the teeth toward the tip of the blade are not completely enclosed inside the handle. The saw really must be carried in a sheath or wrapped in a cloth to prevent those saw teeth from snagging.
Northwoodsman
distinguished member(1099)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/09/2018 05:20PM
I have a Sven Saw, a Boreal 21, and a Silky Big Boy 2000. The silky is by FAR the best of the three. I think my 3 tripping buddies on my last trip will have one before the next trip.
10/09/2018 06:28PM
Have and use the Sven saw. The Silky looks like a great option but I will stick with what I have.
kickapooviking
member (22)member
 
10/09/2018 08:31PM
muddy: "Have and use the Sven saw. The Silky looks like a great option but I will stick with what I have."

I have an antique Sven as well. Yet, I hardly use it since I rarely build campfires anymore. Try heating a home in Wisconsin with hand cut hand split wood 9 months a year. It's a little luxury to camp fire free. The stars are just so much more visible too...
TipsyPaddler
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
10/09/2018 08:44PM
Another Sven saw fan. But I also don’t do a lot of camp fires. Maybe a small fire in the evening if the mood strikes but often it doesn’t. So the 15” Sven saw in a canvas case with its light weight, low cost and small packed size works well for me.

I have a 15” Irwin saw in the famous Ragged sheath for sale if anyone is looking for one. Its a great saw and sheath but just heavier than I need for my tripping style.
dew042
distinguished member (238)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/09/2018 09:22PM
Menards has the Masterforce 13" pruner with a sheath for $20. Razor sharp, I like the curved blade. A lot more effective than the folding ones, but still small and light.
moosedoggie
senior member (80)senior membersenior member
 
10/10/2018 06:26AM
Birdknowsbest: "Silky BigBoy 2000


15 ounces"


+1
Chuckles
member (28)member
 
10/10/2018 11:10AM
We have and love the Rigid saw that AmarilloJim and his scouts love. I was thinking it might need to be replaced with something lighter, but I just put it on the scale and with the case is is 16 oz. The lightest folding saws you're discussing are 15 oz. For the extra oz., I'll keep the tool I love.
10/10/2018 05:18PM
Gerber folding saw. I think it’s about $20.
10/10/2018 08:15PM
Used a Silky Big Boy this past weekend, It could really cut quickly.
TipsyPaddler
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
10/10/2018 09:02PM
Chuckles: "We have and love the Rigid saw that AmarilloJim and his scouts love. I was thinking it might need to be replaced with something lighter, but I just put it on the scale and with the case is is 16 oz. The lightest folding saws you're discussing are 15 oz. For the extra oz., I'll keep the tool I love. "

When I put my Irwin saw and Ragged sheath on the scale tonight it was over 26 oz.
A 15” Sven saw is under 14 oz. I would rather carry another 12 oz of good scotch :-)
doubledown
senior member (73)senior membersenior member
 
10/10/2018 09:55PM
TipsyPaddler: "Chuckles: "We have and love the Rigid saw that AmarilloJim and his scouts love. I was thinking it might need to be replaced with something lighter, but I just put it on the scale and with the case is is 16 oz. The lightest folding saws you're discussing are 15 oz. For the extra oz., I'll keep the tool I love. "


When I put my Irwin saw and Ragged sheath on the scale tonight it was over 26 oz.
A 15” Sven saw is under 14 oz. I would rather carry another 12 oz of good scotch :-)"


I respect this logic

GHOSTOFMURPHYLAKEJIM
Guest Paddler
 
10/10/2018 10:25PM
Another Sven Saw user here.

I like it much more than the cheap folding saw I replaced it with. The folding saw blade was always bending.

Silky saw blade looks stronger but ive never used it.

;)
Jezbo
member (37)member
 
10/11/2018 01:51AM
I’ve owned a lot of saws for canoe camping. It literally depends on your camp style. For having small fires and not cooking over a fire a fold up pack saw will work fine. But cooking and having a fire going mostly or a larger group requires a bigger blade, more bag for the buck. Sven saws are indeed lightweight bit the triangle dimensions cut down on actual cutting surface with every stroke. The saws people talk about on here, I forget the name but look like a carpenter saw with a rough cut blade are awesome but require a big sheath and not packable in a pack unless your very careful, but cut a lot of wood fast. I am partial to A Bib Trustude saw made in Pengilly MN. It’s like a Sven saw for packing and light as hell, but in a rectangle fashion so more blue to work with. You can pack extra blades in the saw for the trip also. I put mine in a PVC pipe and can strap it to a pack, in a pack or to a thwart. Comes in I think 3 sizes. I chose the middle blade cuz it’s a standard pruning blade length. Just need to make sure what you order for extras for well and might have to round off square corners of “non stock” blades. My 2 cents
Jezbo
member (37)member
 
10/11/2018 01:51AM
I’ve owned a lot of saws for canoe camping. It literally depends on your camp style. For having small fires and not cooking over a fire a fold up pack saw will work fine. But cooking and having a fire going mostly or a larger group requires a bigger blade, more bag for the buck. Sven saws are indeed lightweight bit the triangle dimensions cut down on actual cutting surface with every stroke. The saws people talk about on here, I forget the name but look like a carpenter saw with a rough cut blade are awesome but require a big sheath and not packable in a pack unless your very careful, but cut a lot of wood fast. I am partial to A Bob Trustude saw made in Pengilly MN. It’s like a Sven saw for packing and light as hell, but in a rectangle fashion so more blade to work with. You can pack extra blades in the saw for the trip also. I put mine in a PVC pipe and can strap it to a pack, in a pack or to a thwart. Comes in I think 3 sizes. I chose the middle blade cuz it’s a standard pruning blade length. Just need to make sure what you order for extras for extra blades might have to round off square corners of “non stock” blades. My 2 cents
HowardSprague
distinguished member(2840)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 08:14AM
OK, now you guys have done it! I click on this thread - because I have a couple small folding saws, convenient but nothing special and they take time & effort - and now I'm feeling all gung-ho about another piece of gear because I went on the Silky website!!
OK, so folding straight-blade vs folding curved blade.....would the straight fold more compactly/narrowly, and thus be a tad easier to slide into a pack? Any diff as far as sawing efficiency? And some saws offer a LG teeth vs Med teeth vs fine teeth. (and the 2000 has "XL teeth") Opinions?

SilkySaws

AmarilloJim
distinguished member(1372)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 10:28AM
Another reason I prefer the Irwin is to clear portages.
10/11/2018 10:47AM
If making fire is a necessity and priority I carry a 24” folding buck saw, I have both Pole and Paddle & Bob Dusterude versions, both are great saws
dentondoc
distinguished member(1058)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 11:40AM
HowardSprague: "OK, now you guys have done it! I click on this thread - because I have a couple small folding saws, convenient but nothing special and they take time & effort - and now I'm feeling all gung-ho about another piece of gear because I went on the Silky website!!
OK, so folding straight-blade vs folding curved blade.....would the straight fold more compactly/narrowly, and thus be a tad easier to slide into a pack? Any diff as far as sawing efficiency? And some saws offer a LG teeth vs Med teeth vs fine teeth. (and the 2000 has "XL teeth") Opinions?

SilkySaws "

I'm on my second Silky Bigboy (LG teeth version). My first lies at the bottom of one of the western-side lakes in Woodland Caribou park. I guess your first clue about what I think of the saw could be determined by the fact that I bought a second one.

The Irwin cuts slightly faster, but the Silky packs smaller. I prefer to go with a saw that is not restricted in terms of cut depth, which tends to limit Buck/Sven style saws (I've had those, too.). I'll tell you that you can get through pieces that are over a foot and a half in diameter (probably more, but I'm not too interested in tackling much larger timber in the bush). And even with large teeth, the Silky produces a cut that is as smooth as a baby's butt! It is truly an unbelievable saw. (Just don't get any part of your person near the blade ... damn sharp!)

dd
Jaywalker
distinguished member(1554)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 12:52PM
HowardSprague: "
OK, so folding straight-blade vs folding curved blade.....would the straight fold more compactly/narrowly, and thus be a tad easier to slide into a pack? Any diff as far as sawing efficiency? And some saws offer a LG teeth vs Med teeth vs fine teeth. (and the 2000 has "XL teeth") Opinions?
"


I have a Silky Big Boy that is slightly curved. The straight might be slightly smaller, but mine is certainly very easy to pack/unpack. I made a sheath for mine out of Cordura just to help keep in contained and closed. Fits perfectly in the side of my smaller Duluth Pack, so easy to fish out on portages. I've only used it on one 10 day trip so far, and am pretty happy with it. I think the curve helps with the cutting, which would more than offset any tiny extra bit of size. Had one remote portage on my trip with about 6-7 balsams down after a storm. The Silky ripped though those 3-6 inch trees like they were nothing. Portage cleared in minutes. My one reservation about the Silky so far - jury is still out on this for me - is trying to cut logs for splitting in camp with one hand on the saw and one hand on the log being cut into sections. I found holding the saw a bit tiring/annoying compared to the hand position on an Irwin or a bow saw. Maybe it just takes some getting used to. I'd be glad to hear if anyone else has had this issue. For cutting, though, the blade on the Silky is the best. And flipping that blade open makes you feel like some sort of nasty ninja assassin dude.

I also have an Irwin I've used on two trips. Just haven't fallen in love with it like some do. Used it side by side with a Bahco bow saw (non-folding) last winter, and preferred the bowsaw.

HowardSprague
distinguished member(2840)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 01:12PM
"......And flipping that blade open makes you feel like some sort of nasty ninja assassin dude. "

Now, THAT might have just sold me on this saw as much as the many praises of its effectiveness, LOL!!
dentondoc
distinguished member(1058)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 02:39PM
HowardSprague: ""......And flipping that blade open makes you feel like some sort of nasty ninja assassin dude. "

Now, THAT might have just sold me on this saw as much as the many praises of its effectiveness, LOL!!"

Well, it IS Japanese made, and cuts on the PULL stroke.

dd
Othello
senior member (54)senior membersenior member
 
10/11/2018 04:23PM
Another vote for the Silky saws. I've got the BigBoy 2000, but I also own and really like the Ultra Accel 240. It packs a little smaller, but cuts just as well. I like straight blades for fine woodworking, but curved blades are better for camping and yardwork, in my humble opinion.
Northwoodsman
distinguished member(1099)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 04:34PM
The curved blade on the Silky Big Boy 2000 with the XL teeth seems to pull itself into the material and seems much more effective and less tiring. One of the things about the silky saw I noticed is the lack of plastic parts. I have had several of the Corona folding saws for home and garden use and it's usually a small plastic clip or part that breaks that renders the whole saw useless. That's the first thing I looked at on the Silky. I haven't used the other Silky's but the Big Boy 2000 with the XL is like a hot knife cutting through butter.
bwcasolo
distinguished member(1640)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 04:45PM
i have a sven, i like it, fold's down nice and flat. then i bought an irwin. like that as well. packs just fine. i like the large wood handle on the irwin.
THEGrandRapids
member (50)member
 
10/11/2018 04:51PM
I know this is a folding saw thread- but saw a group of 8 guys hauling one of these things in on Horse- up to lower basswood falls. I suppose a good basecamp saw. Is this common?!

Birdknowsbest
distinguished member (245)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 05:14PM
THEGrandRapids: "I know this is a folding saw thread- but saw a group of 8 guys hauling one of these things in on Horse- up to lower basswood falls. I suppose a good basecamp saw. Is this common?!


"


It seems like over kill as the wood you are cutting probably isnt that thick. But I also have the Silky Katana boy saw so I cant talk. Its awesome. I use it for winter camping when using my Snowtrekker hot tent and stove. It also works great on river floats where you are more likely to find wider logs. You could portage it bc it folds and isnt real heavy.

The Big Boy 2000 is my go to for canoe tripping.
Birdknowsbest
distinguished member (245)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 05:20PM
My Silky Big Boy 2000 review Silky Big Boy 2000 review
cyberia34
member (12)member
 
10/11/2018 07:02PM
I've used the Upgrade Innovations Camp Saw for a number of years now. It holds up well and gives you the option of it being configured as either a buck saw or triangle saw. It also keeps the blade well protected when disassembled and packed.
Scout64
distinguished member(1303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 09:39PM
I am a big fan of the Agawa Canyon - BOREAL21 Backwoods Saw. I have a Sven Saw which I really like, but it takes a bit of effort to put it together and the sharper ends can be a little rough on a pack. The Boreal comes together very quicly, rounded edges and the case comes with 2 extra blades. Overall, my favorite saw. When I backpack, I use a Fiskars folding saw.
Chuckles
member (28)member
 
10/12/2018 09:42AM
TipsyPaddler: "Chuckles: "We have and love the Rigid saw that AmarilloJim and his scouts love. I was thinking it might need to be replaced with something lighter, but I just put it on the scale and with the case is is 16 oz. The lightest folding saws you're discussing are 15 oz. For the extra oz., I'll keep the tool I love. "


When I put my Irwin saw and Ragged sheath on the scale tonight it was over 26 oz.
A 15” Sven saw is under 14 oz. I would rather carry another 12 oz of good scotch :-)"


I re-checked my saw and with the case it came to 1lb + 1/8 oz. I then ran a super scientific scale calibration experiment where I weighed a pound of butter and it came up very similar. The saw I use is the 15" Irwin Marathon. We cut through tons of logs for our last trip and it cuts like a dream. For a case, I use the cardboard it came in, reinforced with duct-tape. I'm sure it isn't as fancy as Ragged's sheath, but at 1 oz, it works for me. To keep it from sliding off, I use a twist-tie through the hole and case. Tough as nails, cuts like a dream and for $16 it can't be beat.

Irwin 15" coarse cut saw
GBTG
member (26)member
 
10/12/2018 01:55PM
Likely a crew clearing portage
trails.
TipsyPaddler
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
10/12/2018 05:38PM
Chuckles: "TipsyPaddler: "Chuckles: "We have and love the Rigid saw that AmarilloJim and his scouts love. I was thinking it might need to be replaced with something lighter, but I just put it on the scale and with the case is is 16 oz. The lightest folding saws you're discussing are 15 oz. For the extra oz., I'll keep the tool I love. "

When I put my Irwin saw and Ragged sheath on the scale tonight it was over 26 oz.
A 15” Sven saw is under 14 oz. I would rather carry another 12 oz of good scotch :-)"

For a case, I use the cardboard it came in, reinforced with duct-tape. I'm sure it isn't as fancy as Ragged's sheath, but at 1 oz, it works for me.


Yep. We have very different sheaths which accounts for the weight differences.
mgraber
distinguished member(778)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/14/2018 10:40PM
Boreal 21 all the way. the Silky BB 2000 will probably out cut the Agawa Canyon Boreal21 but the hand fatigue will stop you much sooner than the grip on a bow saw like the Boreal21. They weigh about the same, are close in speed, the Silky is more packable, but I can cut more wood with the Agawa Canyon due to less fatigue.
 
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