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prizes14
distinguished member (131)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 08:45PM
I seem to always camp on some kind of slope. My sleeping bag and pad are so slick that even on the slightest incline, I find my self sliding downhill in my tent way too easily. Anyone else find a way to fix this problem? I've wondered about painting rubber cement on my sleeping pad or maybe finding some stickers with rubber on a side to stick to my pad.
 
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Scout64
distinguished member(1304)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 09:31PM
If your sleeping bag has loops sewn in, you can use sleeping pad straps. They hook on your sleeping bag, go around your pad and hook again on the other side. The straps also add friction to the bottom of the pad to keep it from sliding too. They work well, but I find it a bit constraining. example
OCDave
distinguished member (220)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 10:12PM
prizes14: "I seem to always camp on some kind of slope. ..."

The best advice I can offer: Get yourself an 11" hammock, a down under-quilt and a tarp.

I have painted silicone line on the floor of my TarpTent while seam sealing it. This keeps the pad from skating away during in-tent activity but, it is not an effective solution to problems associated with sloped tent sites.

Good Luck
old_salt
distinguished member(2400)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/11/2018 10:30PM
OCDave: "prizes14: "I seem to always camp on some kind of slope. ..."


The best advice I can offer: Get yourself an 11" hammock, a down under-quilt and a tarp.

I have painted silicone line on the floor of my TarpTent while seam sealing it. This keeps the pad from skating away during in-tent activity but, it is not an effective solution to problems associated with sloped tent sites.

Good Luck
"


Might work for a really short guy. 11”?
wingnut
distinguished member (372)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 07:30AM
I used a Cliff Jacobson tip and had a flannel cover sewn for the pad to cut down on sliding and noise.
OCDave
distinguished member (220)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 07:35AM
old_salt: "Might work for a really short guy. 11”?"

My typing is barely servicable and my eyesight is less so (everything is just a little fuzzy). At this point ' and " are indistinguishable to my eyes on the keyboard as well as in the screen. It really becomes a problem at the local Dollar store... everything costs me 11 dollars.
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13269)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
10/12/2018 08:35AM
Sounds like a hammock is what you need.
scotttimm
senior member (77)senior membersenior member
 
10/12/2018 08:58AM
Put the pad inside your bag! This is the only way my kids will stay on top of their pads. I got a screamin' deal on these pads for our last trip, and I found them to be pretty darn comfy:
Outdoorsman Lab Sleeping Pad
HowardSprague
distinguished member(2968)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 09:22AM
Glad you posted this - I seem to often have the same issue and forget about it until the next time I'm camping. Either my bag & I slip off the pad, or the pad gradually slides down until I'm against the wall of the tent, or both. So I'm interested in a solution too.
Some of the suggestions involve buying new sleeping bags or pads, etc.. I'd prefer to keep my same thermarests/bags, so on. Looking up stuff - ""non-slip" sheets, blankets, dog cushions, etc.. I think the simplest might be to get one of these rubberized mats used under area rugs to prevent slipping, if you cut it to about double the width of the pad and wrap it so it goes between the pad and tent floor and also between the pad and sleeping bag. Rolled or folded up, it shouldn't take up much space (or weight, being mesh) and seems to me it would be grippy enough. Might be worth a try. Something like this:
Gorilla Grip Rug Pad
DrBobDerrig
distinguished member(697)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 10:14AM
wingnut: "I used a Cliff Jacobson tip and had a flannel cover sewn for the pad to cut down on sliding and noise."

Wife found some flannel at Good Will etc and made covers for all the sleeping matts... Definitely the way to go with slip sliding away issues. She made some with regular sheets for the summer and some with flannel during the colder times.

dr bob
DuluthPak
distinguished member(752)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 11:55AM
Big Agnes bags have a sleeve built into the bottom of the bag to slide in the pad. Best thing since sliced bread.
unshavenman
distinguished member(1060)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 02:12PM
Switch to a hammock :)
A1t2o
distinguished member(658)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 02:27PM
HowardSprague: "Glad you posted this - I seem to often have the same issue and forget about it until the next time I'm camping. Either my bag & I slip off the pad, or the pad gradually slides down until I'm against the wall of the tent, or both. So I'm interested in a solution too.
Some of the suggestions involve buying new sleeping bags or pads, etc.. I'd prefer to keep my same thermarests/bags, so on. Looking up stuff - ""non-slip" sheets, blankets, dog cushions, etc.. I think the simplest might be to get one of these rubberized mats used under area rugs to prevent slipping, if you cut it to about double the width of the pad and wrap it so it goes between the pad and tent floor and also between the pad and sleeping bag. Rolled or folded up, it shouldn't take up much space (or weight, being mesh) and seems to me it would be grippy enough. Might be worth a try. Something like this:
Gorilla Grip Rug Pad "


Why not just cut 2 strips? One for under the pad and one for over. You should be able to do it with less material. 2 smaller strips should be easier to pack than 1 bigger one too.
10/12/2018 03:31PM
I've heard of people adding the jar lid grippers or the ones added to bathtubs, in addition to the silicone dots/stripes.
HowardSprague
distinguished member(2968)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 08:23PM
A1t2o: "HowardSprague Something like this:
Gorilla Grip Rug Pad "



Why not just cut 2 strips? One for under the pad and one for over. You should be able to do it with less material. 2 smaller strips should be easier to pack than 1 bigger one too."


Yep - I thought of that after I'd posted. Makes sense, it wouldn't require full length or very large pieces to prevent slipping. 2 smaller pieces would be very easy to pack.
Arcola
distinguished member (158)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 08:40PM
Hmm, is it just me that finds a flat spot to sleep?
Jackfish
Moderator
 
10/12/2018 09:41PM
Don't sleep with your head "up hill". Turn 90 degrees and sleep parallel to the slope. Put some clothes under the down hill side of your sleeping pad and you'll sleep level all night.
10/12/2018 09:47PM
Arcola: "Hmm, is it just me that finds a flat spot to sleep?"


I usually have a fairly flat spot, too, but that's my main priority for a site.
KarlBAndersen1
distinguished member(932)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/12/2018 09:49PM
6 years ago I got my Clark 4 season hammock and have not slept on the ground since.
All I need is two trees. I am always comfortable, dry and warm.
Best camping choice I ever made.
nooneuno
distinguished member(577)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/13/2018 12:00PM
An under rug grip pad works good as well
10/16/2018 06:32AM
this is one of the main reasons I like a hammock.

WhiteWolf
distinguished member(5141)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/16/2018 07:18AM
I got a new tent over the summer (Lightheart Gear DUO). I did not have them seam seal it and I did it myself. For those that don't know - all seam sealer is is equal parts of clear silicone caulk and mineral spirits. Mix together well then put in an small glue like squeeze bottle for easy application. The reason I'am going here is that Lightheart Gear reccms putting strips of the seam sealer (3-4" wide running both up/down and sideways) on the bottom (floor) of it's tents to give the floor some grip to pads etc.... Use a small paintbrush to even out the sealer. Works great.
airmorse
distinguished member(2537)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/16/2018 08:21AM
scotttimm: "Put the pad inside your bag! This is the only way my kids will stay on top of their pads. I got a screamin' deal on these pads for our last trip, and I found them to be pretty darn comfy:
Outdoorsman Lab Sleeping Pad "


Hmmmm. Might have to try these. Looks like they only come in a uninsulated version however.
airmorse
distinguished member(2537)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/16/2018 08:25AM
Lifetime guarantee as well. Nice.
arm2008
distinguished member (105)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/17/2018 07:17PM
WhiteWolf: "I got a new tent over the summer (Lightheart Gear DUO). I did not have them seam seal it and I did it myself. For those that don't know - all seam sealer is is equal parts of clear silicone caulk and mineral spirits. Mix together well then put in an small glue like squeeze bottle for easy application. The reason I'am going here is that Lightheart Gear reccms putting strips of the seam sealer (3-4" wide running both up/down and sideways) on the bottom (floor) of it's tents to give the floor some grip to pads etc.... Use a small paintbrush to even out the sealer. Works great. "

Polyurethane-coated fabrics take a different sealer than Silicone-treated fabrics.
BuckFlicks
distinguished member(614)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/23/2018 03:03PM
We had this happen once when we were in a thunderstorm/downpour and had no chance of making our intended campsite (about a mile but also about 800 veritical feet up a steep switchback slope at 12,000 feet elevation... too exposed and too long of a hike) so we backtracked to the first "flat" area we could find and threw the tent up in record time... without first inspecting the pad site for slope. Or roots. Or flowing water. We were young and inexperienced. We declined to eat dinner because we were bordering on hypothermic and didn't want to be out in the rain anymore, so we just dove into the tent and ate granola bars and cheese crackers before we went to sleep. We were all pretty wiped and it didn't take long before we all fell asleep. But a couple hours later, I woke up with my feet jammed up against the tent wall and I had slid almost all the way off my 3/4 length thermarest. I spent most of the rest of the night fighting the slope and at one point thought it would be a good idea to turn the opposite way with my head downslope. That was even more annoying. I didn't get a lot of sleep that night.

Fortunately, that was an emergency site and we only stayed there one night before going the rest of the way to our intended basecamp, which was a dang luxury mansion compared to what we had just camped in... nice dry flat dirt, no roots, no little rivulets running through it, no damp grass, covered by trees, and right next to a nice little basin pond that was full of rainbow trout, fed by an ice-cold glacier run-off stream that had been frozen only minutes before, and had some of the most delicious water I had ever drank. Drunk? Drinked?

Anyway... since then I've been extremely meticulous when selecting a camping pad site and haven't had the slope issue since then... but I also now have a sleeping bag with a pad sleeve. HOWEVER; I really like the idea of using bathtub grippy stickers on the sleeping pad, I think I will do that that prior to my next trip, even with the pad sleeve.
BearBurrito
distinguished member(648)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/23/2018 04:14PM
The answer to this dilemma is sleep in a hammock! :)
BuckFlicks
distinguished member(614)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/24/2018 12:12PM
I've given some consideration to the hammock, but I'm not a back sleeper... I'm a side sleeper and I don't think a hammock would be healthy for my back and hips while sleeping on my side, and it would be terrible for my airway if I slept on my back.

I have a hammock though I have yet to take it on a trip. It'd be for campsite lounging rather than sleeping.

I don't dismiss the hammock for others, though.
Tman
distinguished member (191)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/24/2018 06:48PM
I wouldn't dismiss a hammock just because you are a side sleeper.

I'm a side sleeper and have tried hammock camping. My buddy has a couple of nice hammock camping setups and took me out a couple of times loaning me one of them. I found the hammock plenty comfortable for my back and hips. No issues at all. I do tend to change sides during the night and found rolling over would wake me up but not because I was uncomfortable. I probably would get used to it if I stuck with hammock camping.

Ultimately, I decided I prefer a tent for the private space for changing clothes, etc. There wasn't much weight savings compared to my lightweight tent so I have stayed with the tent. However, I was fine sleeping the the hammock. Give it a try. Definitely don't need a flat site, but you do need appropriate trees!
Tman
distinguished member (191)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/24/2018 06:48PM
I wouldn't dismiss a hammock just because you are a side sleeper.

I'm a side sleeper and have tried hammock camping. My buddy has a couple of nice hammock camping setups and took me out a couple of times loaning me one of them. I found the hammock plenty comfortable for my back and hips. No issues at all. I do tend to change sides during the night and found rolling over would wake me up but not because I was uncomfortable. I probably would get used to it if I stuck with hammock camping.

Ultimately, I decided I prefer a tent for the private space for changing clothes, etc. There wasn't much weight savings compared to my lightweight tent so I have stayed with the tent. However, I was fine sleeping the the hammock. Give it a try. Definitely don't need a flat site, but you do need appropriate trees!
10/25/2018 10:44AM
I try not to sleep on the ground anymore. When I do and there's a slope involved, I sleep with my head higher than my feet, but at a slight angle to the slope. I drape my open bag over me like a quilt and don't seem to have issues sliding down. Maybe it's because I wake up ever couple of hours because my hips and back hurt though.
OldScout48
distinguished member (352)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/26/2018 09:52PM
Had this problem with Themarest pads years ago.

Get yourself some of the spongy drawer /shelf liner stuff and some velcro adhesive strips.

Cut enough to go around your pad and attach the velcro so you have some side to side adjustment based on much air is in the pad.

The bottom keeps the pad from slipping on the tent floor and the top keeps the sleeping bag in place on the pad.

The only problem is if you want to sleep on the pad and not in the bag you can't move at night once your butt gets stuck to the drawer/shelf liner.

I also tried cutting 2" x 2" squares of the drawer / shelf liner material and then siliconed them directly to the pad. You really only need them where your hips or butt meets the pad on both sides, maybe 10 on each side to start.
 
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