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      spark arrestor     

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bobbernumber3
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12/01/2013 09:01AM
My son and I fired up the woodstove for our first winter camping overnight test in the back yard. After an hour of trying to get the stove heating and choking in blue clouds of smoke, I realized the wood was starving for air. I pulled out the spark arrestor and within minutes the fire was warming the tent nicely.

I am looking for advice on fire starting in a stove and also any comments on spark arrestors...

 
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12/01/2013 09:32AM
Spark arrestors tend to clog quickly when burning typical northwoods available wood such as pine and spruce. They also tend to clog quickly with a stove that gets dampered down, such as a typical trail stove like we use. They are a creosote collector. Especially if the spark arrestor is on the far end of the stove pipe. The closer the spark arrestor is to the fire, the better.

Unless regulated by regional law, such as some western states, spark arresters are not generally necessary for hot tent stoves. Make sure that your chimney is long enough and angle it away from your tent and you shouldn't need a spark arrestor. Don't use paper to start your fires. Paper tends to float up the chimney while still burning.

Merlin
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12/01/2013 09:34AM
I use a Kni-co stove and had the same experience as you. I no longer use a spark arrestor.

When I make a fire, I line the bottom of the box with wood, make a bundle of birch bark and or wax paper, small twigs and split wood. Light the bark and feed with bigger and bigger wood. I keep the door cracked for good airflow until I get a good fire.
PortageKeeper
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12/01/2013 10:17AM
This is the only style spark arrestor that I would take along. One can be bought, or easily made from hardware cloth. You need good draft to get a fire going well, and most spark arrestors hinder that. Once the stove pipe is hot you'll have a natural draft, but with some arrestors you won't even get that far. You lose way less draft with this style.
Minnesotian
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12/01/2013 10:17AM


Exactly what AWBrown said.

I don't use a spark arrester. Instead, I am retrofitting my Kni-Co stove with an internal baffle, very similar to many stoves made like 4 Dog Stove. A baffle keeps the combustion in the chamber a tad longer, thus getting more of the "sparks" burnt in the chamber making for a cleaner burn up the chimney.

Maybe look into that.
GreatBigCubsFan
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12/03/2013 09:14AM
quote Minnesotian: "


Exactly what AWBrown said.


I don't use a spark arrester. Instead, I am retrofitting my Kni-Co stove with an internal baffle, very similar to many stoves made like 4 Dog Stove. A baffle keeps the combustion in the chamber a tad longer, thus getting more of the "sparks" burnt in the chamber making for a cleaner burn up the chimney.


Maybe look into that. "


Could you share with us the photos and how to, I would like to try this as well
misqua
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12/06/2013 07:52AM
As a former U.S. Forest Service employee, you should check with the F.S. prior to using one. As was mentioned in a previous message, the western N.F.usually,but not always, require them.
Minnesotian
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12/16/2013 03:57PM
quote GreatBigCubsFan: "quote Minnesotian: "



Exactly what AWBrown said.



I don't use a spark arrester. Instead, I am retrofitting my Kni-Co stove with an internal baffle, very similar to many stoves made like 4 Dog Stove. A baffle keeps the combustion in the chamber a tad longer, thus getting more of the "sparks" burnt in the chamber making for a cleaner burn up the chimney.



Maybe look into that. "



Could you share with us the photos and how to, I would like to try this as well"


Well, I gave it a go, CubsFan, and I found that the baffle prevented me from really filling up the stove with wood all the way. So I axed it. And, like PortageKeeper has said, the stovepipe, when pushed in all the way, kinda acts like a baffle already.
I think I might try and build a stack robber next, to see if that has any effect on the performance of the stove.
2old4U
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12/17/2013 08:41AM
A baffle also helps hold your heat from going straight up the chimney, maximizing efficiency...thus not requiring you to completely fill up the box with wood. Something to consider.
 
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