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      Lets talk canoe packs     

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singlebladecanoe
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02/26/2020 03:02PM
What pack or type of pack does everyone like to use? I've got several backpacking packs and a couple of old SealLine dry bag packs.

Just curious what everyone uses or likes.
 
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02/26/2020 03:33PM
I have two granite gear packs... a 3.5 from probably the 70s or 80s, used to be a Canadian Border Outfitters pack before it changed hands once or twice until it became mine. The other is a food pack that fits 4 kitty litter buckets pretty well.
There's also a couple seal line dry bags for smaller things like the group first aid kit or other things.

I also use Seattle Sports H2Zero packs for the "things that should stay dry." Despite not having waist straps they carry fairly well provided you don't overpack them.

 
Beast388
member (31)member
 
02/26/2020 03:39PM
Both of my packs are Granite Gear....#4 & traditional food pack. I have been thinking about a narrower pack for this year to better fit my Wenonah Advantage....maybe a SealLine pack.
 
TominMpls
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02/26/2020 03:58PM
I own a lot of packs, but for canoeing I use purpose-built portage packs: the CCS Guide and CCS Pioneer. The way I pack, the Pioneer is the perfect size for two people for a five day trip. The Guide is good for two people for longer trips, and the two together met the needs for three people on a ten day trip two years ago. I carry food in ursacks and/or bearvaults, inside the pack, so a two-person trip has just one bag and a three person trip has one or two.

For solo canoeing I've actually used a small backpacking pack because I don't have a small enough portage pack. I intend to get a smaller portage pack but actually without a brain on top, both my Granite Gear Crown2 and my Osprey Kestrel are low enough for a canoe to clear the pack while portaging, and neither of them cause space issues in a solo canoe.

For backpacking I have a lot of different packs but I've come to mostly use my GG Crown2 because it's simple and light; it's my most recent pack. As backpacking packs go it's better than most in a canoe, and if I had to live with a backpacking pack while canoeing it would be my choice.

That said, a backpacking pack really isn't good for canoeing because they're meant to really fit your body well, which makes it hard to take off and put on and take off and put on and take off and put on all the time. Also the constant loading and unloading is hard on the straps and buckles. Backpacking packs don't fit well in a canoe - most are awkward to lay down, but are too tall standing up.
 
02/26/2020 05:38PM
Mostly solo so whatever will fit and carry comfortably.
Usually a GG Nimbus Trace 60L, Camptrail's Torrid 2, or my upgraded REI Traverse Ptarmigan.

butthead
 
Blatz
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02/26/2020 05:58PM
For your brand spanking new Advantage I would highly recommend the CCS Pioneer or Explorer(If you pack light). Also the Kondos Outfitter Special works great. I used the Explorer on my last 5 day trip and it was plenty.
 
02/26/2020 07:11PM
I own Duluth Packs, Frost River Packs, and CCS Packs. The last 6 years the only ones that have seen use are the CCS Packs .
 
Banksiana
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02/26/2020 07:29PM
My favorites are CCS (I have a Guide) and Kondos Outfitter Special. Both are solid packs and close to the same volume. The Outfitter special is an easier fit for the Advantage. I use a CCS Bushcrafter as a day bag and I carry it with the canoe when portaging.
 
cyclones30
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02/26/2020 07:37PM
CCS Pioneer here and maybe an older Granite gear duluth style pack if we need more packs.
 
moray
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02/26/2020 07:44PM
I use a GraniteGear superior one and a CCS Bushcrafter. I double portage almost all the time. Carry superior one by itself and Bushcrafter with the canoe. I’m just about ready to buy a CCS Pioneer to replace the Superior one.
 
AirPrex
member (26)member
 
02/26/2020 11:28PM
We use two Granite Gear Traditional #4, a Kondos Trail pack and a blue barrel w/ harness. The #4's get lined with 42 gallon 3 mil contractor bags and the trail pack with an 18 gallon 2.5mil trash compactor bag.
 
02/27/2020 04:03AM
I paddle a solo boat that just over 10 feet long so I have to keep my gear weight/size down.

For 7-10 day trips I use a CCS Explorer behind the seat and a CCS Bushcrafter/Rucksack up in the bow. For 3-5 day trips in the summer I can drop down to just the Explorer or the Bushcrafter with a day pack depending on whether I want to single or double portage.

If I travel with others we generally size up to the CCS Pioneer packs for tandem canoes.
 
02/27/2020 04:15AM
butthead: "Mostly solo so whatever will fit and carry comfortably.
Usually a GG Nimbus Trace 60L, Camptrail's Torrid 2, or my upgraded REI Traverse Ptarmigan.
"


I'm going to see if I can use a hiking backpack as my second pack this year in the bow of my small solo. I think the slimmer profile will allow the pack to slide under the front thwart into the bow better than my CCS Rucksack. That will give me more room for my legs.
 
02/27/2020 06:13AM
I have a variety of packs - CCS Pioneer, Granite Gear Solo, Exped Torrent, SealLine, Sea-to-Summit Hydraulic Dry Packs, Chinook Chemun - in various sizes that I use. I have used others too - Kondos and some backpacking packs. All have worked, all can be lined (unnecessary for some), all have their advantages/disadvantages. I don't usually need a huge pack, even for longer trips. The Exped is my small pack for carrying with the canoe, one of the others is the larger.
 
HappyHuskies
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02/27/2020 07:23AM
Lots of good advise so far. While you're shopping you might want to look at Kondos packs too ( know Boonie mentioned them). Made in Ely, good quality and nice folks to deal with. Kondos makes a couple of packs in smaller sizes that I find particularly useful ... the Guide and the Voyageur 2. Both are under 3000 cu in and I find are good for most trips less than 10 days if I'm packing light. The other brands of packs already mentioned are very good too. Hard to go wrong with any of them.

It is very hard to suggest a specific pack for someone else if you don't know how much stuff they are taking. The volume of gear and food you have will really dictate the size pack(s) you need. I love packs and have far too many (just ask my wife), but what I use might not be best for you. Since you said you keep you hiking base weight under 10 pound, I expect you paddling load tends to be light and compact too, so smaller packs might be best for you.


 
02/27/2020 07:47AM
I use a Duluth Pack #4 and Duluth Food Pack. They have served me well over the last 30 years.
 
Northwoodsman
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02/27/2020 07:52AM
I have and use the CCS line-up: Bushcrafter, Explorer, Pioneer and 30L Blue Barrel Harness (which can easily be used without a barrel in it as a pack). My brother has a CCS Guide that I use on occassion. I also own 3 Duluth Pack packs but they seldom get used because the CCS packs are so much more comfortable and easy to close and secure.
 
Ole496
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02/27/2020 08:10AM
2 Kondos Outfitter Special, Kondos Equipment pack, Blue Food Barrel with Kondos Sling and I pack an empty Kondos Guide Pack. I use all or just a few depending on the type of trip and how many are going. After making camp the guide pack is used as a day pack/survival bag (stuff like warm clothes, rain gear, food, water, saw/hatchet, flashlight) for daily exploration.

I also love CCS packs too, excellent quality. I use their tarp and have owned a canoe cover. I just happened to be at the Kondos store in Ely one year and got a deal for buying so many packs.
 
ZaraSp00k
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02/27/2020 08:21AM
I have a paddling partner who says Duluth packs are too old school, he likes the more modern packs with pockets and straps for attaching things outside the pack.

Yet on our last trip, he kept grabbing my Duluth pack rather than his own when it was time to remove them and portage.
 
thlipsis29
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02/27/2020 08:22AM
Like many of the other members of this site, I have opted for CCS packs. I have owned GG, Kondos and Cabela's packs and used Sealine once or twice, but found Dan's products to be the best overall pack for how I trip. I own 2 Pioneer packs, 2 Explorer packs, 3 60 liter barrel packs (one is currently for sale) and a 30 liter barrel pack. Well designed, durable and Dan's customer service is simply outstanding.
 
Blatz
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02/27/2020 08:27AM
ZaraSp00k: "I have a paddling partner who says Duluth packs are too old school, he likes the more modern packs with pockets and straps for attaching things outside the pack.

On our last trip together, when he grabbed my Duluth pack for the second time, leaving me to carry his pack, I asked him where the knife was. He asked why.
"Because I'm going to cut every strap and other protrusion from your pack 'cuz I'm sick of them catching on everything and I assume you grab my Duluth pack because you are sick of it too""

Hip belts and sternum straps evolved into the pack world for a good reason.
 
A1t2o
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02/27/2020 08:34AM
Blatz: "ZaraSp00k: "I have a paddling partner who says Duluth packs are too old school, he likes the more modern packs with pockets and straps for attaching things outside the pack.

On our last trip together, when he grabbed my Duluth pack for the second time, leaving me to carry his pack, I asked him where the knife was. He asked why.
"Because I'm going to cut every strap and other protrusion from your pack 'cuz I'm sick of them catching on everything and I assume you grab my Duluth pack because you are sick of it too""

Hip belts and sternum straps evolved into the pack world for a good reason."

I think he is referring to straps and protrusions on the back of the pack, not the straps and belt that get tied to your body.

I love my CCS Pioneer and 30L barrel pack. CCS does great work and is worth the price. They have comfortable shoulder and belt straps, and can cinch down the pack to keep the weight distributed close to your body. There is a good reason that so many people use these.
 
Tomcat
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02/27/2020 09:11AM
 
treehorn
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02/27/2020 10:12AM
Backpacking packs are more comfortable once they are on, to hike/portage with.

But the CCS style canoe packs are soooooo much easier to get in and out of your boat, and fit into the boat.

It's worth it to have ones designed for canoeing.
 
Pilgrimpaddler
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02/27/2020 10:55AM
I have a CCS Guide, CCS Pioneer, #4 Duluth Pack, Hudson Bay Duluth Pack and two #3 Duluth Packs. Too many packs!
 
IndyCanoe
senior member (62)senior membersenior member
 
02/27/2020 11:56AM
We have 4 bags that we typically use depending on group size.
-Granite Gear Superior One. Really like this bag and use it on every trip but be cautioned it is big and easy to overload! if you fill it to the max it will be heavy.
-60L Blue barrel with a granite gear harness. Used on 2 trips now we like it but if i had it to do again i would probably just buy another portage pack and use either Ursak or BV500's
-Older 65 liter backpack (don't recall the brand it was an REI clearance many years ago) Easy to carry on the portages and we are not concerned about getting it wet and muddy.
-Cabela's Boundary Water Pack. It is also big and a little awkard to carry but it works fine. We typically reserve this bag for sleeping bags, extra clothes and maybe sleeping pads. Lighter but bulky items that benefit from the additional waterproof layer.

Trips with just the 2 of use we could easily get by with just the barrel and the GG Superior one but we typically add one other bag just to spread the load
 
02/27/2020 12:03PM
For solo trips - I go light & single portage - I take a Gossamer Gear Mariposa.

For tandem trips it's a big rented portage pack (I think an Ostrom, but when I buy my own it will of course be a CCS) plus the Mariposa backpack, and that covers two of us. We 1.5 portage.
 
TominMpls
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02/27/2020 12:28PM
luft: "I paddle a solo boat that just over 10 feet long so I have to keep my gear weight/size down."
You use a 10' boat in the BWCA/Q? Is that an ADK style boat? Kind of hard to imagine but intriguing. Do you stick to really small water?
 
02/27/2020 10:09PM
luft: "butthead: "Mostly solo so whatever will fit and carry comfortably.
Usually a GG Nimbus Trace 60L, Camptrail's Torrid 2, or my upgraded REI Traverse Ptarmigan.
"



I'm going to see if I can use a hiking backpack as my second pack this year in the bow of my small solo. I think the slimmer profile will allow the pack to slide under the front thwart into the bow better than my CCS Rucksack. That will give me more room for my legs."


Luft, I paddle an Advantage. Kinda long at 16+ ft. but narrow at the stems. 2 years ago stopping in 2 Harbors at Granite Gear and a Virga 26 jumped out and looked very useful (I am a fanboy of GG). It has become my primary hiking/hunting/canoe daypack. Fairly tall but narrow, with a single compartment, roll top for extension/compression, side straps that can flatten it out, water bladder port, front mesh stretch pocket, and a small belt to use or not.
There are a lot to choose from this one ticked the boxes on my daypack list.

butthead
 
02/28/2020 01:40AM
TominMpls: "luft: "I paddle a solo boat that just over 10 feet long so I have to keep my gear weight/size down."
You use a 10' boat in the BWCA/Q? Is that an ADK style boat? Kind of hard to imagine but intriguing. Do you stick to really small water?"






My primary tripping boat for the BWCA is a 10'6" Hornbeck Lost Pond. I use it for all trips under 14 days.



I use my 14'9" Hemlock Kestrel for longer trips that require more food/gear.

I'm not a huge fan of larger lakes, prefer smaller intimate lakes but I have paddled plenty of big water in my little ADK boat. Had some fun "surfing" down Malberg with a killer tail wind and Alton has thrown some pretty big rollers at me.

I'm 5'5" and under 200lbs.
So the 10'6" boat is a perfect fit as long as I don't get too crazy with overpacking.


 
KarlBAndersen1
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02/28/2020 06:06AM
Seal Line Pro and Blue Barrel.
 
GopherAdventure
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02/28/2020 08:20AM
luft: "TominMpls: "luft: "I paddle a solo boat that just over 10 feet long so I have to keep my gear weight/size down."
You use a 10' boat in the BWCA/Q? Is that an ADK style boat? Kind of hard to imagine but intriguing. Do you stick to really small water?"






My primary tripping boat for the BWCA is a 10'6" Hornbeck Lost Pond. I use it for all trips under 14 days.




I use my 14'9" Hemlock Kestrel for longer trips that require more food/gear.


I'm not a huge fan of larger lakes, prefer smaller intimate lakes but I have paddled plenty of big water in my little ADK boat. Had some fun "surfing" down Malberg with a killer tail wind and Alton has thrown some pretty big rollers at me.


I'm 5'5" and under 200lbs.
So the 10'6" boat is a perfect fit as long as I don't get too crazy with overpacking.



"


I love hearing this. People always give me a little side eye when I tell them I like tripping in my 12’ ADK solo. At 6’1”, I look a little silly in it, but it gets the job done and has always been a stable and reliable vessel for me. I’ve been in some intimidating water on Loon, Basswood, and a few others, but never been frightened too much. It’s great for speed, handling, navigating small creeks/rivers and it has never let me down. I recently got a Northwind Solo that is probably going to become my primary solo trip canoe, but I love ripping around in that 12’ canoe!


Tony
 
gkimball
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02/28/2020 08:55AM
Gear pack is a Granite Gear Superior One. Really like its capacity, shoulder straps and hip belt. I use a heavy plastic pack liner to keep things dry and clean. Food pack is an older Granite Gear traditional food pack with no hip belt.

Food pack in front, gear pack behind. I often travel with a short rope connecting these 2 packs together, not attached to the canoe.

Day pack is an Overboard water proof model, medium size, attached to the mid thwart with a big carabiner. Works well.

It all fits fine in my Wenonah Wilderness solo.
 
02/28/2020 11:06AM
luft: "So the 10'6" boat is a perfect fit as long as I don't get too crazy with overpacking. "

I bet that thing is a dream to portage - what's it weigh?
 
bombinbrian
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02/28/2020 12:30PM
I use Army ACU Molle II packs. I like them for the external frame and they sit really good in a canoe. I also use them for hunting. The only problem is the large one is really easy to over pack. I've started putting the bulky gear in the large packs, tents, clothes, sleeping bags. I have a medium Molle II that I put the other gear in and this year I bought a Chinook Portage pack, we'll see how it works for food. I have another large pack that a barrel will fit in so we'll see which one we decide to take this year.
 
singlebladecanoe
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02/28/2020 01:08PM
Blatz: "For your brand spanking new Advantage I would highly recommend the CCS Pioneer or Explorer(If you pack light). Also the Kondos Outfitter Special works great. I used the Explorer on my last 5 day trip and it was plenty. "

exactly what I am looking to do. I pack light and all my gear is UL type backpacking gear. Now that I have the advantage in my living room (wife doesn't know yet) Not to sure my larger Sealine will fit.
 
overthehill
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02/28/2020 05:00PM
Had GG Superior One for awhile . It was OK, but sold it to downsize. Kept and keep a GG Quetico,Kondos Outfitter Special and barrel harness,Sealine pro 115. All new in 2008. All still good yet. Quetico is my favorite to carry.
it is smaller! :) oth
 
Wables
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02/29/2020 05:26PM
I own or have used packs from all of the major manufacturers, and my vote goes to CCS for the main packs. I usually use a smaller Frost River for cooking and camp equipment. I haven’t tried the CCS blue barrel hauler because I love my Ostrom and don’t see a need to change. Last year my buddy, who works for FR wanted to bring all FR packs for some photo ops for work. We were a good looking crew, but man did I miss the CCS on portages. We must have had $1,500 worth of packs on that trip.
 
CampSR
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03/04/2020 01:05PM
TominMpls: "
That said, a backpacking pack really isn't good for canoeing because they're meant to really fit your body well, which makes it hard to take off and put on and take off and put on and take off and put on all the time. Also the constant loading and unloading is hard on the straps and buckles. Backpacking packs don't fit well in a canoe - most are awkward to lay down, but are too tall standing up. "


I guess I have a different take on this. I currently have a kelty redstone 70L hiking backpack. Yes it is taller than canoe packs, but I find it to be much more comfortable when carrying - especially on long portages. I do not find it difficult to put on or take off, when you are talking about 50+ pounds any pack you put on your back and take off will take some effort. Unloading/loading actually seems less difficult to me, because they are taller you dont have to bend down as far to lift them out of the canoe. Overall I think about what will be the most comfortable as I carry it and will it hold everything I need to put in it, which is what a packs intended purpose is IMO.

Definitely a lot of differing opinions on this, really need to determine what is most important to you when selecting a pack, as well as the rest of your gear. What works for some, does not work for all.
 
jwartman59
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03/04/2020 01:33PM
Three Duluth Foods packs and four Duluth personal packs. Several of them are almost dead. Also a lifetime collection of packpacks that never go on canoe trips.
 
x2jmorris
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03/05/2020 10:08AM
I have a large sealine and a pretty big hiking backpack (currently northface)

As of now I can't see even wanting anything else.

I like the idea of canoe packs being better in canoes but I dislike greatly how they feel when portaging. I would rather have the hiking pack personally. Sealine is just there to keep stuff dry.
 
A1t2o
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03/05/2020 10:29AM
CampSR: "TominMpls: "
That said, a backpacking pack really isn't good for canoeing because they're meant to really fit your body well, which makes it hard to take off and put on and take off and put on and take off and put on all the time. Also the constant loading and unloading is hard on the straps and buckles. Backpacking packs don't fit well in a canoe - most are awkward to lay down, but are too tall standing up. "



I guess I have a different take on this. I currently have a kelty redstone 70L hiking backpack. Yes it is taller than canoe packs, but I find it to be much more comfortable when carrying - especially on long portages. I do not find it difficult to put on or take off, when you are talking about 50+ pounds any pack you put on your back and take off will take some effort. Unloading/loading actually seems less difficult to me, because they are taller you dont have to bend down as far to lift them out of the canoe. Overall I think about what will be the most comfortable as I carry it and will it hold everything I need to put in it, which is what a packs intended purpose is IMO.


Definitely a lot of differing opinions on this, really need to determine what is most important to you when selecting a pack, as well as the rest of your gear. What works for some, does not work for all."


I think that the reason most people have an issue with backpacking packs is because they want to get the weight as low as possible in the canoe for stability. With canoe packs, they can be laid flat on the bottom and fit when laid perpendicular to the canoe. Backpacking packs have to be stood up, laid in the direction of the canoe, or propped up on something else. Laying them the long way gets to be an issue when trying to fit other packs in the same area or when the crossbar starts to get in the way. Not every canoe is the same though.

Some people also like having the pack sideways in the canoe for easier loading and unloading. You can put the pack directly on your back from the canoe and visa versa much easier when it is sideways with the straps up. Canoe packs being shorter also allows for you to portage with the pack and canoe on your shoulders at the same time. If you aren't single portaging then this might not be a concern for you, but if you are then a taller bag can get in the way.
 
CampSR
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03/05/2020 12:22PM
A1t2o: "I think that the reason most people have an issue with backpacking packs is because they want to get the weight as low as possible in the canoe for stability. With canoe packs, they can be laid flat on the bottom and fit when laid perpendicular to the canoe. Backpacking packs have to be stood up, laid in the direction of the canoe, or propped up on something else. Laying them the long way gets to be an issue when trying to fit other packs in the same area or when the crossbar starts to get in the way. Not every canoe is the same though.


Some people also like having the pack sideways in the canoe for easier loading and unloading. You can put the pack directly on your back from the canoe and visa versa much easier when it is sideways with the straps up. Canoe packs being shorter also allows for you to portage with the pack and canoe on your shoulders at the same time. If you aren't single portaging then this might not be a concern for you, but if you are then a taller bag can get in the way."


You make some good points, I appreciate the feedback, but I am also not sure I 100% agree with all of them. For instance, in my past we have had 3 guys total, in a MN III, with 3 hiking backpacks, fishing gear, etc. and they arranged decently and did not seem to make things unstable. We do not have extra packs or food bags, so it limits what we are carrying or trying to fit in the canoe. We also typically single portage and trade off who carries the canoe, still while carrying our packs, and have not had an issue with pack/canoe interference. I cannot speak for everyone or every situation, just giving my opinion based on my experience.
 
A1t2o
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03/05/2020 01:33PM
CampSR: "You make some good points, I appreciate the feedback, but I am also not sure I 100% agree with all of them. For instance, in my past we have had 3 guys total, in a MN III, with 3 hiking backpacks, fishing gear, etc. and they arranged decently and did not seem to make things unstable. We do not have extra packs or food bags, so it limits what we are carrying or trying to fit in the canoe. We also typically single portage and trade off who carries the canoe, still while carrying our packs, and have not had an issue with pack/canoe interference. I cannot speak for everyone or every situation, just giving my opinion based on my experience.
"


With an MN III, I doubt you would notice stability issues as much as some other canoes. Isn't that canoe wide with a flat bottom? I have a Grumman Eagle which has great secondary stability but that makes it feel a little tippy on the water so the lower we can get the center of gravity, the better. Even one extra butt pad makes a big difference.

I agree that every situation is different. I'm just sharing my observations and reasoning after owning both an internal frame hiking pack and a CCS canoe pack.
 
03/05/2020 01:37PM
In the same opinion slot as CampSR. Most often the pack fit is only opinion from some who only use portage packs. I've never had a problem tandem, and it's a non-issue in solo canoes.

If you like p-packs fine, a lot of tradition and relatively less costly than backpacking packs, just do not tell me my backpack frame pack ( internal or the externals I have used), will not fit. They do, and comfortably.

butthead
 
Tomcat
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03/05/2020 02:00PM
 
MikeinMpls
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03/06/2020 10:47AM


I don't know why Battle Lake packs don't get more press. We have two Grand Portage packs. They are simply the best packs I have ever used in the BWCA. They are huge (problematic for some) but sturdy, stout, with superior craftsmanship. They have fully adjustable straps, to include straps that will bring the top of the pack closer to your back once the pack is one. Waist belt that is also multiple adjustable, as well as a sternum strap. I haven't yet figured out how to destroy on.

Minnesota made. I highly recommend them.

Mike

Battle Lake Grand Portage Pack
 
muddyfeet
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03/06/2020 03:33PM
When I solo, I prefer a backpacking pack. It’s skinny enough to fit in a narrow boat, and comfortable to carry. When you’re single-portaging that new Advantage for anything over 150r, you’ll find it helps to get as much gear weight on your hips as possible. Canoe packs have generally poor hipbelt-suspension, but backpacking gear is designed for it. The problem when single portaging a solo, is that the seat is right behind your head. So a lot of the volume in backpacking packs can be in the collar and topcover- anything that sticks up above your shoulders can start to interfere with the canoe seat. Sometimes there will be a sweet spot where you have just enough height in the pack that the seat will rest on it and put some canoe weight on your hips as well. For casual trips I’ll usually also have a small daypack with lunch/tackle/rain gear that I stash in the front of the boat.

Another downside of backpacking packs is that they can soak up a lot of water. Wether from the bilge or rain, a pack can gain several pounds of weight when wet vs dry. Even a dyneema ultralight pack can sponge up water in the hip padding. Canoe packs, on the other hand, are usually more water resistant.

Ultimately, you’ll find what works best for you through experience- it’s fun to see how different people prefer to solve these problems.
If you haven’t yet, come join the solo forum where there is a ton of good info, and a very friendly group of solo paddlers.
 
singlebladecanoe
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03/06/2020 05:55PM
Tomcat: "butthead: "In the same opinion slot as CampSR. Most often the pack fit is only opinion from some who only use portage packs. I've never had a problem tandem, and it's a non-issue in solo canoes.



If you like p-packs fine, a lot of tradition and relatively less costly than backpacking packs, just do not tell me my backpack frame pack ( internal or the externals I have used), will not fit. They do, and comfortably.
butthead"



+1


Backpacking pack works well for me also. I have never had an issue stowing in canoe or single portaging with backpack and canoe. "


I need to pack my backpacking pack and see how it fits in the canoe. I primarily use small lightweight packs so hoping that I can keep with that since they are more narrow than what I see of portage packs. Which is going to be a concern in my new canoe.
 
woodsandwater
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03/06/2020 06:37PM

I am a Duluth Pack fan. However, my church group just bought two outstanding packs from Cooke Custom Sewing.
 
singlebladecanoe
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03/06/2020 06:43PM
muddyfeet: "When I solo, I prefer a backpacking pack. It’s skinny enough to fit in a narrow boat, and comfortable to carry. When you’re single-portaging that new Advantage for anything over 150r, you’ll find it helps to get as much gear weight on your hips as possible. Canoe packs have generally poor hipbelt-suspension, but backpacking gear is designed for it. The problem when single portaging a solo, is that the seat is right behind your head. So a lot of the volume in backpacking packs can be in the collar and topcover- anything that sticks up above your shoulders can start to interfere with the canoe seat. Sometimes there will be a sweet spot where you have just enough height in the pack that the seat will rest on it and put some canoe weight on your hips as well. For casual trips I’ll usually also have a small daypack with lunch/tackle/rain gear that I stash in the front of the boat.


Another downside of backpacking packs is that they can soak up a lot of water. Wether from the bilge or rain, a pack can gain several pounds of weight when wet vs dry. Even a dyneema ultralight pack can sponge up water in the hip padding. Canoe packs, on the other hand, are usually more water resistant.


Ultimately, you’ll find what works best for you through experience- it’s fun to see how different people prefer to solve these problems.
If you haven’t yet, come join the solo forum where there is a ton of good info, and a very friendly group of solo paddlers. "


Thank you for the feedback. I have joined the solo forum, look forward to reading more over there and participating in those discussions.
My plan is single portage. I'm used to ultralight backpacking, just need to start playing around with load out configuration for canoe tripping UL. Good thing is we have a couple of lakes I can get test trips in before taking the new outfit up to BWCA in either June or Sept.
 
03/09/2020 01:43AM
sns: "luft: "So the 10'6" boat is a perfect fit as long as I don't get too crazy with overpacking. "


I bet that thing is a dream to portage - what's it weigh?"


16lbs :-)



 
Banksiana
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03/09/2020 09:33AM

I don't think hiking backpacks are worse dealing with water than the standard canoe pack (exception being dedicated water proof packs like the sealine or backpacks that are divided into many compartments with many seams), An internal frame pack will fit the cargo area of the Advantage better than most canoe packs and as noted carry a load better. The problem is that the height of a backpack interferes with the yoke and usually renders a single carry extremely uncomfortable if not impossible. Loading and unloading internal frame packs in and out of canoe tends to beat them up a bit.

The Kondos Outfitter Special Lies flat behind the seat in the Advantage and is relatively easy to extract. A very well designed and assembled pack. If I use my CCS Guide I have to make certain to pack it "narrow" or I have issues. I have a big single chamber Lowe internal frame pack from the mid 80's that fits great but is excruciating to carry with the canoe.
 
jwartman59
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03/09/2020 10:18AM
Something not mentioned but I feel is very important is the fact that nylon tend to be slippery when you are carrying two packs, canvas packs ‘stack’ much better and are easier to carry.

 
singlebladecanoe
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03/09/2020 07:46PM
Banksiana: "
I don't think hiking backpacks are worse dealing with water than the standard canoe pack (exception being dedicated water proof packs like the sealine or backpacks that are divided into many compartments with many seams), An internal frame pack will fit the cargo area of the Advantage better than most canoe packs and as noted carry a load better. The problem is that the height of a backpack interferes with the yoke and usually renders a single carry extremely uncomfortable if not impossible. Loading and unloading internal frame packs in and out of canoe tends to beat them up a bit.


The Kondos Outfitter Special Lies flat behind the seat in the Advantage and is relatively easy to extract. A very well designed and assembled pack. If I use my CCS Guide I have to make certain to pack it "narrow" or I have issues. I have a big single chamber Lowe internal frame pack from the mid 80's that fits great but is excruciating to carry with the canoe."


Good points. I need to load up one of my backpacking packs and test out how well if fits in the canoe as well as with carrying the pack/canoe. I was looking at the dimensions of the CCS Pioneer and the Kondos Outfitter. The Outfitter looks to larger than the Pioneer. Both are on my list of considerations.
 
singlebladecanoe
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03/09/2020 07:49PM
jwartman59: "Something not mentioned but I feel is very important is the fact that nylon tend to be slippery when you are carrying two packs, canvas packs ‘stack’ much better and are easier to carry.

"


I solo, my plan is 1 pack and to single portage.
 
jwartman59
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03/09/2020 10:57PM
singlebladecanoe: "jwartman59: "Something not mentioned but I feel is very important is the fact that nylon tend to be slippery when you are carrying two packs, canvas packs ‘stack’ much better and are easier to carry.


"



I solo, my plan is 1 pack and to single portage."



That’s not what your original post said. Sorry I must have missed your intent
 
Abbey
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03/15/2020 07:32PM
I would just start out with what you already own and see how you like it. I’ve used an old backpacking internal frame that has also been around the world. We have one dry bag that fit nicely inside of it for the food and put the cooking implements, flasks, and other heavy items in the remaining space. Certain items always went in certain pockets. It’s BWCA nickname was “The Chuckwagon”. Made the call on our trip last year that it made its last trip after almost two decades of service. It always laid just right perpendicular to the canoe, and it carried that dense/heavy load very nicely. Our other packs are dry bags with external straps including the workhorse sealline 110L. It always felt like we were the only ones in the park without a portage pack, but I knew that our system worked just right for us.

We replaced The Chuckwagon with a CCS Guide over the winter as it seemed to have the best suspension system of the portage packs. We won’t be flying internationally with the CCS though. Also bought a more travel-specific pack for the airports.

The Chuckwagon was nothing special and was actually kinda boring. I hadn’t backpacked with it for years as I had also gotten a fancy whisper of an ultralight pack. But CW was dependable and a great companion like a golden retriever. I will miss that pack on the trip this year.
 
jfinn
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03/15/2020 08:10PM
So rewind 10 years ago before I started tripping in the BWCA, I had a mountaineering pack that was high volume and lots of straps and buckles, tall and narrow. This was my primary backpacking pack and then a smaller weekend pack. Neither would be a good fit for the BW. I looked at a few packs and ended with a CCS Explorer as well as a guide. The guide doesn't come out much anymore, but I find the explorer perfect for week long solos or week long tandem trips. Sits parallel on solos and perpendicular on tandem usually. Its just choice. Durable and simple, water resistant and rides so well in a canoe. Just right.

With that said, I wouldn't mind having a backpack if its height was low enough to carry a solo. Certainly on long carries (250r +), and I single portage 95% of the time, the Explorer gets a little challenging with a canoe. Mostly because of the boat, but the carry system and ride just isn't the same from a Portage Pack to a technical backpack.

Typical pack weight is 25-38#

John
 
03/15/2020 09:33PM
jfinn: "I wouldn't mind having a backpack if its height was low enough to carry a solo. "

This is an important point, or at least for me is something I well remember learning (by doing it wrong at first, of course). Had to shift things around in the pack to get the height down enough to also carry a canoe...
 
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