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      Insulating my Hennessy Hammock     
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Fox416
member (17)member
 
09/05/2013 05:31PM
I've recently purchased a Hennessy Hammock and plan to use it on my trip to the BWCA in the middle of September. I am wondering if I need to have an underquilt if I am expecting temps to be in the 40 degree range at night. I have a Mountain Hardware UltraLamina 15 degree synthetic sleeping bag & a Thermarest Trail Pro self inflating pad. Any advise would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 
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tonyyarusso
distinguished member(1336)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/05/2013 05:54PM
I'm not sure if you NEED it, but you will definitely WANT it.
 
Rambler
distinguished member (200)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/05/2013 06:43PM
Everyone is a little different but I would assume with your bag and the pad you would be ok. I would also wear a stocking cap around the forty degree mark. However, if you have the money I would order up an underquilt. I was ok in my thirty degree bag and sleeping pad down to forty five. I never had the opportunity to test it in lower temps. I bought the underquilt and don't regret it one bit. I'm so much more comfortable with the underquilt than I was with a pad.
 
RainGearRight
distinguished member(1563)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/05/2013 07:29PM
quote Rambler: "Everyone is a little different but I would assume with your bag and the pad you would be ok. I would also wear a stocking cap around the forty degree mark. However, if you have the money I would order up an underquilt. I was ok in my thirty degree bag and sleeping pad down to forty five. I never had the opportunity to test it in lower temps. I bought the underquilt and don't regret it one bit. I'm so much more comfortable with the underquilt than I was with a pad."

I was pretty cold a couple of septembers ago in my 15 degree marmot bag and big Agnes pad. The first night, it was 26 in ely and whenever I slipped off the pad I was instantly cold. Next night wasn't as cold and I used a nalgene hot water bottle and was much more comfortable. Ordered an underquilt when I got home.



You might get a little chilly if you slide off the pad but you'll live. Don't inflate the pad all the way, it makes it hard to stay on top of in the hammock.
 
Fox416
member (17)member
 
09/05/2013 08:11PM
Thanks for the input! I may be doing some online shopping tonight. After a quick stop at the banana stand for a withdrawal. Thanks again!
 
talusman
distinguished member(1037)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/05/2013 09:10PM
I've spent a few sub 30 degree nights in my hammock with a closed cell foam pad. They are better insulators than an inflatable pad. I used a 24 inch army surplus mattress, it's easier to stay on top of. I have since gone to the underquilt though.
 
jeroldharter
distinguished member(1518)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/05/2013 10:29PM
Don't listen to any of the people who will tell you that you will be comfortable with a makeshift pad and ear muffs. I have tried several approached wanting to avoid buying (and packing) and under quilt but never again.

A full length underquilt is no question the way to go once temps get into the 40's and below. They are so much more effective. I have a full length 900 fill down underquilt plus a 900 fill down top quilt. You can't be more comfortable in a hammock in the cold.

If your goal is survival on a shoestring, disregard this. If your goal is comfort and good sleep in the cold, listen to this.

FYI, a lightweight underquilt is lighter and less bulky than a Thermarest pad.
 
linkster
distinguished member (265)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/06/2013 06:27AM
I have a Hennessey Hammock Deep Jungle and slide my Thermarest in the sleeve. However, when the temp drops you will definitely need some extra protection underneath you. You have a great sleeping bag, but the bottom compresses and reduces the insulating properties of the bag. In addition, you will experience a great deal of heat loss from the side of your arms as the hammock rolls around you. I made myself a segmented pad extender a long time ago. ENO now has a commercial version that would be less than the price of an under quilt.

http://www.rei.com/product/830279/eno-hotspot-hammock-sleeping-pad-wings

The hammock forum is a great reference for those that like to hang:

https://www.hammockforums.net/

I hate a cold butt.
 
KarlBAndersen1
distinguished member(1082)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/06/2013 08:10PM
I've been testing my new Hammock Gear 20 degree full length with overfill.
After having spent a few cooler nights without an UQ, I can not imagine ever being without one.
Get the coldest rated one you can afford.
You can always loosen it up just a bit for a little air circulation in warmer temps.
Get a decent under quilt and never look back.
 
OBX2Kayak
distinguished member(4401)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
09/07/2013 08:31PM
You may want to check out the threads on our Private Group Forum: BWCA Hammocking (just scroll down to the bottom of the main page).

Underquilts
 
LuvMyBell
distinguished member(2479)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/11/2013 10:31AM
Before making a final decision on which underquilt to buy, you should check out the ENO Ember Underquilt. At $175 it's kind of pricey but it works with almost any camping hammock made and works as advertised.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(12832)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
09/11/2013 11:15AM
You will need some kind of insulation, a pad or underquilt. With a pad they tend to skip out of place leaving you a cold spot. An underquilt is the way to go. Mine is an Arrowhead kick ass quilt. I had the guy sew in extra insultex insulation and I'm good to about 20 deg. Even in a 65 deg night you will freeze to death from the air under the hammock.
 
nelsonone
distinguished member (187)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/11/2013 12:46PM
I have been camping with a hammock now for the last four years and I will hop on the train that you will want something under you. I use a Thermarest half mat and that does help, but a full length would be better. This year I have decided that I am going to bring an under quilt with me. . I just finished this one and I will test is out next week up on Hustler Lake.

12oz of 900 down fill, dual differentially cut and shock cord suspension. I am hoping this will keep me warm down to twenty degrees.


As far as a pad goes one thing that I have found that helps keep my pad under me is to slide the pad inside of my sleeping bag. I have a down mummy bag and this really helps me keep the pad from sliding around.
 
09/11/2013 01:19PM
I have used an ALPS oversized pad put in at angle on my HammockBliss double with good success down to the upper 30's. It is huge and my 5'11'/240# carcass is able to stay on top. But being huge it is a real hassle to pack in. Too much $ on other toys this year, but an underquilt and upgrade to a warbonnet is on my wish list.

I read somewhere this morning paddling a Wenonah is like a Chevy and a Bell like a Cadillac. Drive what you must but if you drive a lot the word is the warbonnet system is the way to go.
 
Hamm0cker
senior member (91)senior membersenior member
 
09/11/2013 03:00PM
Be advised: If you need to "go to ground" and you lack a pad,
you-are-screwed!
I won't engage in the pad/underquilt argument as I have both and use both, but like I said, as useless as the bottom of a sleeping bag is while hanging, it's even more useless on Mesabi black granite!

 
markaroberts
distinguished member(830)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/11/2013 06:24PM
We have used hammocks the last four years in BWCA, going mid September. Last Trip we had four Hennessy's, a Clark Jungle Hammock, and a Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter. The Clark had a Jacks R Better Nest down filled underquilt. Temps got to 30's and that guy stayed toasty. The Grand Trunk guy used a closed cell foam pad and was instantly cold if he ever moved off the pad. I had a synthetic filled full length quilt and was very warm, although feet got a little cool. The last two guys had Hennessy's with varying parts of a Super shelter. They got cold.

We have tried every way possible. what we have found is that the sleeping pad or closed cell pad does okay down to the mid 40's. super Shelter to lower 40's. When you hit the 30's you are going to need a full length underquilt.

There are also ways to "go to ground" using paddles and ropes to hold the hammock ends up so only your mid section will be on the ground.
 
OBX2Kayak
distinguished member(4401)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
09/11/2013 10:28PM
During eleven days in the Boundary Waters and Quetico early last August, I had two or three nights with temps in the high 30's. I was happy to have my JRB underquilt with me.

 
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