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Papa09
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07/15/2017 09:29PM
I'm looking for a new tent. I would like it to be as lightweight as possible, high quality, bomb proof, and under $500. It will just be for me. I'm 5'7" and about 180 lbs. Any suggestions?

 
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quark2222
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07/15/2017 09:38PM
I would suggest getting a 2-person tent. Not a lot more weight, and a lot more room.

Tomster
andym
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07/15/2017 11:10PM
Tarptent has a variety of choices that fit your requirements.

Tarptent
OldFingers57
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07/16/2017 09:09AM
I use a Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 as a one person tent. Has the side entry and two vestibules for gear plus lots of room inside. I use it for backpacking too.
Grandma L
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07/16/2017 09:33AM
My vote for a 1 person- Big Agnes Copper Spur series - or North Face Triarch - all under 3 pounds and under $400.

If you are looking at 2 Person tents - there are more options.
The Copper spur series is still one of the lightest - though not the cheapest -by far - at just under $500.

The Marmot Tungsten 2 ($200) and Nemo Losi 2 ($389) are very will made but a little heavier at 5#.


07/16/2017 09:37AM
BSI Chinook

Still using it and very happy with it!
Certainly not the only option, but some of the small cottage industry makers have very interesting shelters.

butthead
07/16/2017 10:26AM
Based on your criteria and the specifications and reviews, I'd be looking at either butthead's BSI or a TarpTent, probably the Scarp1. You didn't really specify what weight was lightweight and obviously there are various tradeoffs among the criteria, but one of those should do it for you. There are other options, of course, and you can check out some lightweight hiker blogs for other options and opinions. Good luck with your search.
07/16/2017 11:24AM
quote OldFingers57: "I use a Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 as a one person tent. Has the side entry and two vestibules for gear plus lots of room inside. I use it for backpacking too. "

+1

Also, I used a CCS Lean Plus 1 for the first time in June. No poles, 38 ounces and really, really roomy (5' x 10' footprint and 5'-5.5' high at the ridgeline)! For solos, this is the only shelter I will use in the future.
07/16/2017 02:04PM
The CCS Lean1+ is another good option - solidly staked down and guyed out it is much more windproof than you'd imagine unlike some other similar-sounding options.
SevenofNine
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07/16/2017 04:01PM
quote andym: "Tarptent has a variety of choices that fit your requirements.


Tarptent "


The one stop place to go for quality light weight shelters.
07/16/2017 05:24PM
quote SevenofNine: "quote andym: "Tarptent has a variety of choices that fit your requirements.



Tarptent "



The one stop place to go for quality light weight shelters."


They do look nice, but for the money and space, I would take Dan's CCS Lean any day of the week.
mgraber
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07/16/2017 05:33PM
Another vote for the BA Copper Spur.
Papa09
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07/16/2017 08:10PM
Thanks for all the responses! I have some research to do now. When I said lightweight I was hoping for under 3 lbs.
Papa09
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07/16/2017 08:45PM
quote Frenchy19: "quote OldFingers57: "I use a Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 as a one person tent. Has the side entry and two vestibules for gear plus lots of room inside. I use it for backpacking too. "


+1


Also, I used a CCS Lean Plus 1 for the first time in June. No poles, 38 ounces and really, really roomy (5' x 10' footprint and 5'-5.5' high at the ridgeline)! For solos, this is the only shelter I will use in the future.
"


Is there any protection from the bugs with this? Also, if it rains with high winds could you get potentially pretty wet?
07/16/2017 08:58PM
quote Papa09: "quote Frenchy19: "quote OldFingers57: "I use a Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 as a one person tent. Has the side entry and two vestibules for gear plus lots of room inside. I use it for backpacking too. "



+1



Also, I used a CCS Lean Plus 1 for the first time in June. No poles, 38 ounces and really, really roomy (5' x 10' footprint and 5'-5.5' high at the ridgeline)! For solos, this is the only shelter I will use in the future.
"



Is there any protection from the bugs with this? Also, if it rains with high winds could you get potentially pretty wet?"


It rained on every day of my trip...11 days of rain, and I never got wet, and none of my gear did either. Regarding bugs, the no-see-ums did get in, and that was annoying! Gonna ask Dan to sew in a different mesh. That said, no complaints during two weeks of the most buggy season at hand.
Papa09
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07/16/2017 08:58PM
quote andym: "Tarptent has a variety of choices that fit your requirements.


Tarptent "






I'm kinda interested in the Tarptents. Any comments or suggestions on Tarptents?
andym
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07/16/2017 09:40PM
What you give up with a tarptent or many other light backpacking tents is being freestanding. However, even with the bwca's shallow soil we have found it easy to pitch our Tarptent Hogback which is 4-person and 4-lbs. By giving up the tent being freestanding you save a lot of weight. Some of the tents include all poles while others use hiking poles to pitch. But you can always get tent poles from tarptent to use instead. Or use paddles. Our tent pitches really fast and keeps the inner tent dry even when pitching in the rain.

For smaller tents, the scarp series are most similar to the Hogback. But they are a bit heavier. I do like the new cloudburst 3 person tent. Just a few ounces over 3 lbs. to stay under 3 lbs with no hiking staffs needed, I might go for the rainbow or double rainbow. He's got a new page to help you choose a tent by features or specs. I would start there.

Like CCS gear, these tents are designed by someone who uses them and they are good designs that work well. A lot of thought goes into the shape of the cloth so that it pitches well under tension without a frame. And he has been to the BW.
Mad_Angler
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07/16/2017 09:43PM
I love love love my Big Agnes Fly Creek. It is aUL3. ir is only 3 pounds and has a lot of space. A UL2 would probably be perfect if you are sure that you will always be alone.
ozarkpaddler
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07/17/2017 06:48AM
quote andym: "What you give up with a tarptent or many other light backpacking tents is being freestanding. However, even with the bwca's shallow soil we have found it easy to pitch our Tarptent Hogback which is 4-person and 4-lbs. By giving up the tent being freestanding you save a lot of weight."

Looking at that Tarptent Bowfin, it's pretty much "Freestanding." Two stakes, one for each vestibule and that's it. Check out the video. Besides the weight, that "TWO MINUTES BAG TO PITCHED" really caught my eye. I shouldn't have looked at this thread (LOL)!

Tarptent Bowfin
barracuda
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07/17/2017 07:19AM
quote Papa09: "Thanks for all the responses! I have some research to do now. When I said lightweight I was hoping for under 3 lbs. "

BA Fly Creek UL 2

Under 2.5#, still under 3# with footprint, big enough for me and the dog, great ventilation (way less condensation then my old msr), good in extended rain, mostly freestanding (needs staking to achieve full width/full fly coverage). End vestibule is kind of awkward but I resent it less than I thought I would. Under 2#'s if you ever get to leave the tent body behind and go fly/foot only.

CCS lean plus1

Under 3#'s (mine weighs 44oz, ymmv), big enough for wife, dog, and myself, not freestanding, can be finicky or perfect depending on site/wind direction, I use a variety of groundcloth sizes depending on need/weather, good bug free hangout zone.




Papa09
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07/17/2017 08:54AM
quote ozarkpaddler: "quote andym: "What you give up with a tarptent or many other light backpacking tents is being freestanding. However, even with the bwca's shallow soil we have found it easy to pitch our Tarptent Hogback which is 4-person and 4-lbs. By giving up the tent being freestanding you save a lot of weight."


Looking at that Tarptent Bowfin, it's pretty much "Freestanding." Two stakes, one for each vestibule and that's it. Check out the video. Besides the weight, that "TWO MINUTES BAG TO PITCHED" really caught my eye. I shouldn't have looked at this thread (LOL)!

Tarptent Bowfin "


I apologize if I've enabled any gear addictions. I'm really liking these Tarptents, I just can't decide which one. Are foot prints recommended for the Tarptents? Although I haven't seen them on their site so maybe it's not even an option?
andym
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07/17/2017 11:15AM
I think he has footprints on his shopping part of the site but he doesn't think they are needed. The ones he sells are tyvek. We use a 2 mil plastic innie available in the paint section of your local hardware store.

I was defining freestanding as standing with the basic shape without stakes. Tarptent rely on the stakes for tension in the fabric. A few can be freestanding with extra poles, e.g. the scarps and the hogback.
07/17/2017 11:25AM
Lots of good options given the OP's parameters. Hope he shares what he ends up buying!!
andym
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07/17/2017 01:42PM
From the Tarptent FAQ on groundsheets:
"Use of a groundsheet depends on the conditions you expect to encounter and your style of camping. The sewn-in flooring is remarkably tough and does not usually require a separate groundsheet. We sell optional Tyvek groundsheets which are very tough and great for sleeping out or taking a break, but generally heavier than you need for floor protection on longer hikes, in most conditions. For use on very rocky ground and desert conditions where puncture wounds are possible, a groundsheet is recommended."

Tarptent tyvek groundsheets
07/17/2017 02:14PM
I bought graphite poles to replace the aluminum ones in my ALPS mountaineering 1-p tent. Knocked off a pound from the total weight but the downside is that while the poles are lightweight, they are also not a strong as the aluminum. I carry a small aluminum sleeve or two just in case a wicked storm blows up. I'd also agree that a 2-p lightweight tent would be a better option -- more room. I looked into these a season or two ago but couldn't afford them (they are not cheap but worth it!).
Papa09
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07/17/2017 02:25PM
quote Frenchy19: "Lots of good options given the OP's parameters. Hope he shares what he ends up buying!!"

I'm still researching but as of now I'm in love with the Tarptent Bowfin 1. I will keep you updated but I'm about 75% sure that is the route I'll go. I have twin two year old boys so I'm limtited to one trip a season right now and I just got back two weeks ago. So I have plenty of time! Since I do have time to spare, does Tarptent ever run specials or sales?
Papa09
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07/17/2017 02:41PM
Another question...if and when I do buy a Tarptent one of the options is the interior. They offer Mesh, Partially Solid ($15 more), or you can purchase both ($130 more). I'm thinking all I need is mesh, but is there any reason I would want both? Or partial solid instead of the Mesh?
Franzenrp
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07/17/2017 07:16PM
Just got back from a seven daysolo trip and the bugs were very thick in the evening, I took my five foot CCS Lean+ and thru in a REI Bughut tent at the last minute, and the combo worked great. The Bughut is all screen and lite under two pounds thru that in the Lean at nite and it gave great protection from the bugs. Its freestanding and still had ample room inside the Lean, the Lean also acted as my tarp, and screen room during the days.
walleyehunter422
member (31)member
 
07/17/2017 07:44PM
A company called Seek Outside has a backpacking light weight tipi tent. They come in differents sizes from 1 person to 24 person. I've been thinking about the 6 person my self just need the wife to "ok" it. I think the Freemans' used this style tent for their year in the BWCA.
07/17/2017 07:45PM
quote Franzenrp: "Just got back from a seven daysolo trip and the bugs were very thick in the evening, I took my five foot CCS Lean+ and thru in a REI Bughut tent at the last minute, and the combo worked great. The Bughut is all screen and lite under two pounds thru that in the Lean at nite and it gave great protection from the bugs. Its freestanding and still had ample room inside the Lean, the Lean also acted as my tarp, and screen room during the days."

I assume your Lean does not have a zip in mesh screen?
andym
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07/17/2017 10:00PM
We just have the mesh. Except for very cold conditions I think that is enough.

Not sure about sales. You could email them and see what they say. Henry is a pretty helpful guy.
muddyfeet
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07/17/2017 11:07PM
Might be a good time to explore hammock camping.

Positive: great for solo, as roomy as you want, drier than anything on the ground, more comfortable.

Negative: easy to try with a pad and tarp you already own, but it can be a gear-intensive black hole to get into a really good lightweight setup.
07/18/2017 02:13PM
quote Papa09: "Another question...if and when I do buy a Tarptent one of the options is the interior. They offer Mesh, Partially Solid ($15 more), or you can purchase both ($130 more). I'm thinking all I need is mesh, but is there any reason I would want both? Or partial solid instead of the Mesh?"

I think this is one of those questions that has more than one answer. A lot depends on your primary use - where and when you go - and your personal preferences. Mid-to-late summer vs. end of shoulder seasons? How much protection do you want from wind, blowing dust, sand, snow, rain vs. ventilation and cooling?

You may want to check out some of the options from people like Mountain Laurel Designs and Six Moon Designs and some others. You can also get some very informed opinions from bloggers like Adventure Alan and Andrew Skurka.

There are going to be trade-offs and you need to understand them and prioritize what's most important to you.
Papa09
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07/18/2017 08:44PM
quote boonie: "quote Papa09: "Another question...if and when I do buy a Tarptent one of the options is the interior. They offer Mesh, Partially Solid ($15 more), or you can purchase both ($130 more). I'm thinking all I need is mesh, but is there any reason I would want both? Or partial solid instead of the Mesh?"


I think this is one of those questions that has more than one answer. A lot depends on your primary use - where and when you go - and your personal preferences. Mid-to-late summer vs. end of shoulder seasons? How much protection do you want from wind, blowing dust, sand, snow, rain vs. ventilation and cooling?


You may want to check out some of the options from people like Mountain Laurel Designs and Six Moon Designs and some others. You can also get some very informed opinions from bloggers like Adventure Alan and Andrew Skurka.


There are going to be trade-offs and you need to understand them and prioritize what's most important to you."


I'll check them out. Thanks for the input!
 
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