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bwolfe77
member (26)member
 
04/20/2018 09:06PM
I have a CCS tarp and I have the ridge line all set how I want it (prusiks, inline stuff sack) but I'm wondering about ways to tie out the four corner guylines.

I have a few ways that I use but I'm wondering if anyone has something I've missed or overlooked.

thanks
 
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OldFingers57
distinguished member(5408)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/20/2018 09:54PM
I just have 15 ft lengths of the cord Dan sells. I carry a few extra 15 ft lengths in case I need some extra length to get to a tree, rock or log. I just use a trucker’s hitch to tighten the line. The end tied to the tarp I use a bowline. I use an elastic hair tie to secure the rolled up length of line when not in use.
TipsyPaddler
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
04/20/2018 10:17PM
OldFingers57: "I just have 15 ft lengths of the cord Dan sells. I carry a few extra 15 ft lengths in case I need some extra length to get to a tree, rock or log. I just use a trucker’s hitch to tighten the line. The end tied to the tarp I use a bowline. I use an elastic hair tie to secure the rolled up length of line when not in use. "

I have 20 feet on the edges but otherwise same same...works great!
unshavenman
distinguished member(1052)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/20/2018 10:45PM
TipsyPaddler: "OldFingers57: "I just have 15 ft lengths of the cord Dan sells. I carry a few extra 15 ft lengths in case I need some extra length to get to a tree, rock or log. I just use a trucker’s hitch to tighten the line. The end tied to the tarp I use a bowline. I use an elastic hair tie to secure the rolled up length of line when not in use. "


I have 20 feet on the edges but otherwise same same...works great!"


Yep, that's about what I have for a setup as well, with a continuous ridgeline.
04/21/2018 06:57AM
TipsyPaddler: "OldFingers57: "I just have 15 ft lengths of the cord Dan sells. I carry a few extra 15 ft lengths in case I need some extra length to get to a tree, rock or log. I just use a trucker’s hitch to tighten the line. The end tied to the tarp I use a bowline. I use an elastic hair tie to secure the rolled up length of line when not in use. "


I have 20 feet on the edges but otherwise same same...works great!"


Same.
04/21/2018 08:10AM
Somebody always needs to contradict the general thinking, I will here. I seldom use a ridge line setup and prefer an umbrella style tarp set.

Never know how I'll set it up so all cordage (3mm or 1/8th inch) is removed from my tarp. Basic cordage consists of 2, 40 ft. 6, 20 ft. handfull of figure9 and mini biners, assortment of shorter lengths.
Can use umbrella, ridge line, flying diamond, lean, and some really unusual setups. Whatever fits the need.

"I'm wondering about ways to tie out the four corner guylines." I like truckers hitches as often and in as many locations as possible to allow adjustment.

butthead
04/21/2018 09:12AM
I wouldn't think that a pre-rigged ridgeline would necessarily prevent me from using an umbrella setup (or others) with addition of cordage to center loop, but have not tried it.

Wondering if you've tried it and I'm missing something . . . ?
04/21/2018 10:13AM
boonie: "I wouldn't think that a pre-rigged ridgeline would necessarily prevent me from using an umbrella setup (or others) with addition of cordage to center loop, but have not tried it.


Wondering if you've tried it and I'm missing something . . . ? "


No it would not at all. But as I mostly use an umbrella set, often with the drop pull up line off center, I just start fresh each setup. Even when using a ridge line set, often I'll run the ridge offset from the center.
So many ways to set a tarp, and now I have the time to play with them!

butthead
OldFingers57
distinguished member(5408)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/21/2018 10:43AM
I use a ridge line set up but to make it umbrella set up we just use a piece of wood for a tarp pome with a tennis ball on the end of it to push the tarp up.
04/21/2018 10:46AM
Thanks, I don't get much time to play around with mine - no trees in the yard.

Also never thought about doing it off center - thanks for the idea.

I can see I'd have a lot of excess cordage wrapped up, but dangling around, so if I did it more often I'd probably start fresh, but the ridgeline setup is what I use mostly.
04/21/2018 10:50AM
I've used the double blade paddle as a pole to raise the center like that OldFingers57.
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1580)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/21/2018 07:52PM
I just use 4 strings on the corners. The strings are similar to those sold by CCS. I love to use truckers hitches to tighten the lines.

I really like the center ridgeline setup. After 10 years in the BW, I'm still amazed how will it works and that I didn't find it sooner. Center ridgeline
trailcheif
distinguished member (138)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/22/2018 07:37AM
I like leaving line on the four corners, cause I usually just stake them out. The use of reflective line is a great option. Trucker hitches are the fool proof method. Here is another option that makes tensioning them pretty simple.
Tarpworms
mschi772
distinguished member (194)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/22/2018 07:52AM
butthead: "Somebody always needs to contradict the general thinking, I will here. I seldom use a ridge line setup and prefer an umbrella style tarp set.

butthead"


When you think about it, that's just a ridgeline that only runs through one loop. Did I just blow your mind?
04/22/2018 08:40AM
Dreaded DP!

butthead
04/22/2018 08:40AM
Uh nope, and it does not make a ridge. But I tend to be a bit math/geometry oriented than artistic.

butthead
04/22/2018 08:57AM
I use a permanent center ridge line and 20 feet of line on each corner. This doesn't prevent me from setting up in any variety of ways.

Northwoodsman
distinguished member(1069)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/22/2018 09:47AM
You are on the right path. The game changer for me was the CCS Ridgeline Stuff Sack. The best $30 ever spent. When I pull up to a campsite my tarp is up within a couple of minutes. I leave my CCS tarp pre-rigged with one end of the ridge line coming out of the grommet on the bottom. I tie that end off to a tree. I then open up the other end of the bag and grab the other end off the ridgeline and take that to the other tree that I tie off to. As I do this my tarp stays off the ground out of the mud, dirt and leaves. Once the ridgeline is taunt, I slide the tarp out of the sleeve and slide it along the line to where I want it placed then secure it with the pre-tied prusik knots. I then tie out the corners (lines are already rigged and kept in place with some elastic loops). Again, the tarp never touched the ground. If it's raining I now have a dry place to assemble my tent before setting it in place and a dry place to unpack all my gear. I have 20' of line on each corner and 15' (sometimes) on the two center loops along the long edge. I only use these two latter lines in heavy winds.

This works well if you need to find shelter during a downpour or a storm, or perhaps get out of the sun for a lunch break.
04/22/2018 10:39AM
I did it exactly like Northwoodsman last fall. It's really beneficial when solo. I learned the Siberian Hitch that Dan mentioned to anchor and the Trucker's Hitch to tighten.
Jaywalker
distinguished member(1507)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/23/2018 03:07PM
I do mine a little bit differently than most the others. I have a DIY silnylon tarp that is similar to a CCS tarp and almost always just do a ridge line set up. Here are the couple little differences for me:

1. I only have about 10 feet on each corner and in the middle of each side, but I keep about three 10 foot extensions in the bag, usually of a different color to make them easier to spot. If a 10 foot line can't reach a tree, I add a square knot and have 20 feet. Most of the time there is either a tree or Im staking to the ground, and 10 feet is both enough and easier to work with than 20 feet. If needed I can add one of the extensions to the extra tie out loops for more stability (I have 5 on each side of tarp).

2. Instead of bungies on the loops, when I take my tarp down I wrap the cords by extending my hand and tying figure 8's around my thumb and small finger. With the last 2-3 feet I wrap the figure 8 cord with about 5-7 wraps, then tuck the last few inches under the last wrap as a slip knot. I do the tie outs and each end of the ridge line with each taking me just 5-6 seconds to tie. Then when I go to set up, I never have any lines to untangle, and just pulling the slip knot frees the entire line for use.







3. I am not a fan of truckers hitches. They are great for synching a line super tight, but I have never felt that much tension was needed for a good pitch. I also find them slower to tie and untie, and slower to adjust than than my favorite knot - the slip tautline hitch - which is just a regular tautling hitch but with a bight pulled through at the end instead of the whole end of the rope. With most all cords this will hold just a strong as a tautline hitch. I can adjust them by just pulling or pushing like a prussik, they tie fast, and untie by just pulling the end with one hand.

It seems like every other day I'm racing to get my tarp up or down before it rains, and always doing it solo so speed matters. My tarp goes up and down very fast. I should, however, add a ridgeline bag as others have mentioned.
04/23/2018 06:35PM
Jaywalker's 2nd and 3rd points are very well made! I also use one of Dan's stuff sacks, and I usually use a ridge line. I also like playing with different set ups; that has become one of my favorite things to do.

04/23/2018 08:20PM
Thanks, Jaywalker . . .

1. I'm considering cutting all my 20-foot guylines in half like. Most of the time 10 feet would be plenty, and that would be easier to work with than the 20-footers.

2. Not sure about the figure 8's; I'm not having any trouble with the "hair things", but it would be one less thing . . . We'll see.

3. I did the trucker's hitch last year, but may just go back to the tautline hitch I used before. I've been wondering about using a [hammock] tree hugger there to gain some leverage with less wear and tear on the tree and cordage. Tree huggers are cheap and light enough I might give it a try.



Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13181)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
04/23/2018 10:11PM
butthead: "Somebody always needs to contradict the general thinking, I will here. I seldom use a ridge line setup and prefer an umbrella style tarp set.

Never know how I'll set it up so all cordage (3mm or 1/8th inch) is removed from my tarp. Basic cordage consists of 2, 40 ft. 6, 20 ft. handfull of figure9 and mini biners, assortment of shorter lengths.
Can use umbrella, ridge line, flying diamond, lean, and some really unusual setups. Whatever fits the need.

"I'm wondering about ways to tie out the four corner guylines." I like truckers hitches as often and in as many locations as possible to allow adjustment.


butthead"



Very nice tarp setup Ken, I’m going to try the umbrella method.
04/24/2018 08:58AM
boonie: "Thanks, Jaywalker . . .


1. I'm considering cutting all my 20-foot guylines in half like. Most of the time 10 feet would be plenty, and that would be easier to work with than the 20-footers.


2. Not sure about the figure 8's; I'm not having any trouble with the "hair things", but it would be one less thing . . . We'll see.


3. I did the trucker's hitch last year, but may just go back to the tautline hitch I used before. I've been wondering about using a [hammock] tree hugger there to gain some leverage with less wear and tear on the tree and cordage. Tree huggers are cheap and light enough I might give it a try.



"


The figure 8 deal works really well!
bwolfe77
member (26)member
 
04/25/2018 09:23PM
(OP here)

I like what I've seen so far, it's pretty much what I've been doing. I ran across this wrinkle and am considering giving it a try, let me know what you think:

Most of what I've seen here and done before is to semi-permanently tie the guyline to the tarp (sheet bend, bowline, cow hitch, etc) and then stake out the line or use a tree. This running end extends out from the tarp and gets the tension (Dutch gear, niteize figure 9, trucker's hitch, etc) near the attachment point.

However, what I'm thinking of doing is switching this up so when I need to adjust tension I can do so close to the tarp instead of walking in the rain to the tieouts. I'd use a timber hitch on a tree or a marlin spike hitch on a stake to secure the running ends and then use a (slippery) midshipman's hitch at the tarp. Then I can stand under at least really close to the tarp and adjust as necessary.

Thoughts?
04/26/2018 05:42AM
I don't know, but I'd think it would take longer to set up that way if they weren't pre-rigged, so maybe just replacing problem with another. It would be more important to me to get set up quickly if it's raining than to adjust tension while it is raining.

The other thing I've heard about doing is attaching them to bungee cord loops that are attached to the tie outs. I may try that sometime.
OCDave
distinguished member (182)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/26/2018 08:05AM
bwolfe77: "(OP here)


I like what I've seen so far, it's pretty much what I've been doing. I ran across this wrinkle and am considering giving it a try, let me know what you think:


Most of what I've seen here and done before is to semi-permanently tie the guyline to the tarp (sheet bend, bowline, cow hitch, etc) and then stake out the line or use a tree. This running end extends out from the tarp and gets the tension (Dutch gear, niteize figure 9, trucker's hitch, etc) near the attachment point.


However, what I'm thinking of doing is switching this up so when I need to adjust tension I can do so close to the tarp instead of walking in the rain to the tieouts. I'd use a timber hitch on a tree or a marlin spike hitch on a stake to secure the running ends and then use a (slippery) midshipman's hitch at the tarp. Then I can stand under at least really close to the tarp and adjust as necessary.


Thoughts?
"


To merge 2 active threads: My new tarp hanging anthem is "Fifty ways to leave your lover" -
mschi772
distinguished member (194)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/26/2018 04:17PM
bwolfe77: "(OP here)


I like what I've seen so far, it's pretty much what I've been doing. I ran across this wrinkle and am considering giving it a try, let me know what you think:


Most of what I've seen here and done before is to semi-permanently tie the guyline to the tarp (sheet bend, bowline, cow hitch, etc) and then stake out the line or use a tree. This running end extends out from the tarp and gets the tension (Dutch gear, niteize figure 9, trucker's hitch, etc) near the attachment point.


However, what I'm thinking of doing is switching this up so when I need to adjust tension I can do so close to the tarp instead of walking in the rain to the tieouts. I'd use a timber hitch on a tree or a marlin spike hitch on a stake to secure the running ends and then use a (slippery) midshipman's hitch at the tarp. Then I can stand under at least really close to the tarp and adjust as necessary.


Thoughts?
"


Do it. What I do, to both protect the loops of my tarp and to adjust tension at the tarp, is use figure 9's clipped the tarp. Dutchware stingers or certain knots/hitches would also do the same thing. It's especially nice to be able to adjust tension near the tarp when it's raining because you don't have to leave the shelter of the tarp to make your adjustments (depending on wind and tarp pitch of course).
mschi772
distinguished member (194)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/26/2018 04:17PM
double post
 
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