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john 800
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02/28/2016 03:45PM
What is out there now as far as a small lightweight fish/ depth finder that would work on a canoe trip? I have had Humminbird smartcasts in the past but they never lasted more than 1 or 2 trips.

 
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bassnet
distinguished member(607)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2016 04:02PM
yea...plenty on the market, even color. I have a pirahnaMAX 230. I like it, does all I want for a portable. I would want more features (like gps) if it was a permanent graph setup, but it has zoom, temp , pretty good backlight...ten AA batts last a week in BW.(maybe 10 hrs. a day, 6-7 days). Plus if you have been over a spot several times you know the structure so you can turn it off to save a little juice.
02/28/2016 04:09PM
quote john 800: "what is out there now as far as a small lightweight fish/ deapth finder that eould work on a canoe trip? i have had humminbird smartcasts in the past but they never lasted more than 1 or 2 trips.
"


Google "BWCA.com depth finder" as this has been discussed many times.
thinblueline
distinguished member (475)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2016 05:03PM
quote Wables: "quote john 800: "what is out there now as far as a small lightweight fish/ deapth finder that eould work on a canoe trip? i have had humminbird smartcasts in the past but they never lasted more than 1 or 2 trips.
"



Google "BWCA.com depth finder" as this has been discussed many times. "


He's asking for what is out there now. Most, if not all of the past threads that pop up during a search mention a lot of discontinued fishfinders.
Moonman
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02/28/2016 07:19PM
John, in reality any newish fish finder will work just fine. If this is mainly for canoe trips, you of course want the lowest current draw. And therein lies the difficulty. I have noticed that most new units in the last two years or so, have a ton of what I would consider extra features that increase current draw. Now this is great if you are in a boat, with a couple big 12v batteries in series and all the power you want. It also seems like most units now are color, not sure if anyone is making a black and white finder. Anyway, that will be your only challenge. Also, you will have to download a few manuals to check the exact milli amp draw of each unit. The most basic unit from the last 5 years will work wonderfully. If you can still find a 3-4 year old model from lowrance, garmin, huminbird etc, that might be your best bet. You might get a great deal on it if you do.

Moonman.
nofish
distinguished member(2688)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2016 08:32PM
I've used a few older portable fish finders over the years but last year I picked up a new Humminbird Helix 5 portable unit.

The portable package comes with either the sonar or sonar/gps unit, transducer, 12v battery, a mounting platform, carrying case and a battery charger. I also have a 2nd transducer that turns it into a unit for ice fishing. It has the standard graph and also the traditional flasher style graph as a viewing option.

I took the unit up on a week long trip last summer. I used it a couple hours each day and never charged it. I don't have the gps combo unit but I imagine adding gps will reduce batter life.

The only down side is overall size and weight but if you want one of the best portable units then this is arguably one of the best.

In order to save weight/size I have seen some people buy the sonar unit without the portable package and then make their own carrying case for it. If you do that you might be able to save a little weight and maybe a little bulk. Although the carrying case that comes with it is nice because it has a built in zipper pocket for the transducer to go into during transport.
Moonman
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02/28/2016 09:57PM
quote nofish: "I've used a few older portable fish finders over the years but last year I picked up a new Humminbird Helix 5 portable unit.


The portable package comes with either the sonar or sonar/gps unit, transducer, 12v battery, a mounting platform, carrying case and a battery charger. I also have a 2nd transducer that turns it into a unit for ice fishing. It has the standard graph and also the traditional flasher style graph as a viewing option.


I took the unit up on a week long trip last summer. I used it a couple hours each day and never charged it. I don't have the gps combo unit but I imagine adding gps will reduce batter life.


The only down side is overall size and weight but if you want one of the best portable units then this is arguably one of the best.


In order to save weight/size I have seen some people buy the sonar unit without the portable package and then make their own carrying case for it. If you do that you might be able to save a little weight and maybe a little bulk. Although the carrying case that comes with it is nice because it has a built in zipper pocket for the transducer to go into during transport. "


Hey Nofish the helix 5 is indeed a great unit but I think the OP indeed did want something lighter and less bulk. Thats why I was mentioning current draw. While perfect with its stock battery, converting the helix 5 and similar units to run off AA's you end up with batteries not lasting as long as they could, with a lower power draw unit. Now for dual use / ice fishing like you mentioned, then I think its a great solution, but again, all depends on weight and bulk you want to carry. Same way that some guys carry in 6 rods and tons of tackle etc. it all depends on what else you are leaving behind etc or maybe just how much you are willing to huff and puff.

Moonman.
KerryG
distinguished member (365)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2016 11:02PM
If what you're looking for is a good solid unit, with a low current draw (i.e., black and white) there are still Garmin Echo 151's out there for sale. Check out Amazon, they have them for sure. You may not want to pay extra for the portable unit since you may want to replace the battery that comes with that package anyway for something lighter. These are very good units for canoe country - lightweight, simple to use and low current draw.
To add a P.S. If you're looking for something like this I wouldn't wait too long. This model is being discontinued and I don't see anyone putting out black and white units anymore.
nofish
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02/28/2016 11:38PM
I realized he's probably looking for something less bulky but I just thought I'd throw out the option. Its for sure bulkier and heavier with the 12v but if you are on a hardcore fishing trip I would probably consider it given how valuable it could be.
AFCGooner
member (19)member
 
02/29/2016 06:38AM
I was interested in this "Deeper Fishfinder" tow behind ball.
https://buydeeper.com/deeper

I just don't know if I want to carry another device (phone/tablet) to use it. I haven't pulled the trigger yet, so I'm glad you asked.
newguy
distinguished member (227)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/29/2016 06:54AM
To KerryG, did you buy the Garmin Echo 150 without the portable unit, and if you did, what steps did you follow to make it portable?

I had a portable Lowrance X-4 that I used one time, sent in for RMA, and Navico sent me back a color Elite 3-X. Similar to john 800, looking for a new lightweight greyscale unit.
Moonman
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02/29/2016 02:54PM
quote nofish: "I realized he's probably looking for something less bulky but I just thought I'd throw out the option. Its for sure bulkier and heavier with the 12v but if you are on a hardcore fishing trip I would probably consider it given how valuable it could be."

Yoh are right nofish, on a long, hardcore fishing trip it might be handy to have something with more options.

Moonman.
Moonman
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02/29/2016 02:56PM
quote newguy: "To KerryG, did you buy the Garmin Echo 150 without the portable unit, and if you did, what steps did you follow to make it portable?


I had a portable Lowrance X-4 that I used one time, sent in for RMA, and Navico sent me back a color Elite 3-X. Similar to john 800, looking for a new lightweight greyscale unit."


The process is fairly straitforward (i have the echo 100 which is converted to AApower)

1) get a battery pack holder from radio shack or similar. Check your manual but most of those units (the garmin echo 100&150 for sure) run between 10-18volts, so a 10 AA battery pack is perfect. With each AA battery giving 1.5 volts, an 8 battery holder gives 12 volts, but a 10 battery holder give 15 volts. This means you get way more actual usuage and power out of the batteries, and your unit will run much longer than if using 8 batteries,
2) cut! Your power cable, giving yourself enough cable to accomodate yur desired placement in your canoe etc.
3) get a small waterproof container which will house your battery pack. Make a small hole in a corner, just wide enough to squeeze your cable through. Wire the cable to the leads provided by the battery pack. Silicone around the cable and hole yyou made in the container. Put the cover on the container and you are done. Really easy. i should add that most units come with an inline fuse...make sure you keep it in place!
4) An option would be to shorten your transducer cable. Some guys are intimidated by it but I did it and it was fairly easy, if a little finicky.
There are a ton and I mean a ton of posts on the forum with all kinds of info on this subject. Here is a picture of my battery set up, housed in a Lock and Lock container from Walmart...



KerryG
distinguished member (365)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/29/2016 02:57PM
quote newguy: "To KerryG, did you buy the Garmin Echo 150 without the portable unit, and if you did, what steps did you follow to make it portable?


I had a portable Lowrance X-4 that I used one time, sent in for RMA, and Navico sent me back a color Elite 3-X. Similar to john 800, looking for a new lightweight greyscale unit."

Actually I did buy the Echo 151 portable bundle but only because it was on sale cheaper than the non-portable model. The fact is that since I'm not going to use the supplied battery (relatively compact but very heavy,) I had to go out and get a replacement cable connector (which is the very same one you'd get with the non portable model.) So unless you plan to use the battery supplied with the portable bundle, I wouldn't bother paying the extra bucks.
newguy
distinguished member (227)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/29/2016 04:35PM
Thanks, Moonman and KerryG.

Moonman, I bought these holders. Can you expand on "wire the cable to the leads"? I haven't spliced wires before. A link to eHow or something is good enough for me, no custom instructions needed!

I see a separate instruction that says to use shrink tubing. Can it be applied without a heat gun? If not, what's the alternative?
Moonman
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02/29/2016 05:55PM
Hey newguy, yes those are the type of holders I was talking about. And yes, best to use heat shrink tubing. No heat gun required. Just use a lighter and wave it a couple inches under the tubing, it will shrink no probs. Give me a sec and I will grab my unit and take a pic of everything for you, as well as fuse etc. it will be straight firward when you see the close up pics.

Moonman.
Moonman
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02/29/2016 06:44PM
Here is a pic of the join from power cable to battery holder leads:


The larger black section of wire is the join with heat shrink. A soldered connection is best, but will work if you just twist the ends together ( if not a good connection it may break etc with use, but you can just rejoin...). The best way to do it is to slip a larger diameter section of heat shrink over both leads of the power cable. Then smaller diameter heat shrink over one side of the individual (pos/neg) leads, join the wires, slide that smaller section of heat shrink over the join, and shrink it. Do the same with the other side. Once both wires are joined, slide the larger heat shrink over both sets of wires and shrink. Here is another pic of the whole works:


The foam on my transducer cable is just pipe insulation zip tied around the cable. This works perfectly to float the transducer level when Ice fishing...no special 'ice' ducer needed!

Moonman.
adibee
senior member (66)senior membersenior member
 
02/29/2016 11:44PM
How useful is a fish finder up in the bwca? Do alot of you take them with you? I don't fish alot outside of the bwca but do you think it's worth it to get them for trips up there? I am looking at the new striker4 which can be had for 120$

Stryker 4

These 2 look very similar and use 4aaa batteries. Norcross is more expensive though.

Norcross f33p

Kissmart®-Portable-Sounder-Transducer-Fishfinder/dp/B00LZVLKUW/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_pl_foot_top?ie=UTF8
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1188)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2016 07:09AM
Moonman
distinguished member(842)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2016 07:12AM
quote adibee: "How useful is a fish finder up in the bwca? Do alot of you take them with you? I don't fish alot outside of the bwca but do you think it's worth it to get them for trips up there? I am looking at the new striker4 which can be had for 120$


Stryker 4

These 2 look very similar and use 4aaa batteries. Norcross is more expensive though.

Norcross f33p

Kissmart®-Portable-Sounder-Transducer-Fishfinder/dp/B00LZVLKUW/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_pl_foot_top?ie=UTF8 "


If you don't fish a lot outside BW then I wouldn't bother getting one.

Moonman.
Saberboys
distinguished member(661)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2016 08:50AM
I've been in the market for an affordable fish finder as well, and trying to weigh features vs. cost as it will only be used for the BW and ice fishing.

I found the standard black and white Lowrance X-4 at Fleet Farm for $69.99 and a color Lowrance Elite 3X DSI (down scan imaging) for only $90! Seems like a heck of a deal for the improved imaging and it states that the draw is still only 10-17 volts. The operating frequency is 83-200kHz, I'm not sure if I should be paying attention to any other numbers to figure out if I can get a weeks worth of battery life running on Moonman's 10 AA battery set up or not??
MagicPaddler
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03/01/2016 09:54AM
quote Saberboys: "I've been in the market for an affordable fish finder as well, and trying to weigh features vs. cost as it will only be used for the BW and ice fishing.


I found the standard black and white Lowrance X-4 at Fleet Farm for $69.99 and a color Lowrance Elite 3X DSI (down scan imaging) for only $90! Seems like a heck of a deal for the improved imaging and it states that the draw is still only 10-17 volts. The operating frequency is 83-200kHz, I'm not sure if I should be paying attention to any other numbers to figure out if I can get a weeks worth of battery life running on Moonman's 10 AA battery set up or not??"

Saberboy
You state that it runs on 10-17 volts. That tells you how many AA (.8 volts to 1.6 volts if alkaline) batteries to connect in series. But what about current draw. Color means the back light must be on to see the screen. That means more current. Down scan imaging means more current. The 3X is a nicer unit but it will run the batteries down much faster.
Most back country fisherman go to the X-4 not for the difference in purchase price but for the reduced battery consumption.
FishermanTed
distinguished member (165)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2016 10:32AM
Someone asked are fish finders necessary. Yes. No matter where you fish.

10 years ago I would not have said that. Then I bought a fishing lodge and now do this professionally. Meaning, I make a living making sure guests catch fish. And guide plenty. All summer long. In all types of weather. All conditions.

Here is what I learned when I became a paid professional. I knew a lot less than I thought I did. A lot. Why? Because like many I always went fishing when it was the easiest time to do so. Most productive. I thought I was pretty darned good. Until I was taken out of my element. New water. Different season. Variable conditions. A shock to the system for sure.

Half of fishing is presenting the bait, finesse, hook setting, fighting the fish etc. But the other half is finding the fish. A fish finder is invaluable and should be on everyone’s boat that is serious about wanting to catch fish. In June you think you are the man because you catch lots of fish. Well, it doesn’t get much easier than that. Come back in July. When the fish are in 20+ feet of water. Not holding to structure. Following bait fish on a lake system. Different ballgame isn’t it……

A finder will show you underwater drops/humps where fish hold. They will show bait balls and schooling bait fish that larger fish will be following. They will show you bottom composition that fish may like. All of this could never be determined without a finder. Cruising around in a canoe or boat you would have no clue what’s going on below you without one.

Once my waters warm on my lake system I require all my guides to take finders to the out-lakes to help find fish. Drop-shotting is one of our best methods but without electronics you wouldn’t have the first clue where to start. Even if you think you know the waters, fish move! A nice unit will be worth its weight in gold. You have a short time to fish and enjoy your vacation. Why jerk around looking for the fish.

-FT
adibee
senior member (66)senior membersenior member
 
03/01/2016 12:30PM
quote FishermanTed: "Someone asked are fish finders necessary. Yes. No matter where you fish.


10 years ago I would not have said that. Then I bought a fishing lodge and now do this professionally. Meaning, I make a living making sure guests catch fish. And guide plenty. All summer long. In all types of weather. All conditions.


Here is what I learned when I became a paid professional. I knew a lot less than I thought I did. A lot. Why? Because like many I always went fishing when it was the easiest time to do so. Most productive. I thought I was pretty darned good. Until I was taken out of my element. New water. Different season. Variable conditions. A shock to the system for sure.


Half of fishing is presenting the bait, finesse, hook setting, fighting the fish etc. But the other half is finding the fish. A fish finder is invaluable and should be on everyone’s boat that is serious about wanting to catch fish. In June you think you are the man because you catch lots of fish. Well, it doesn’t get much easier than that. Come back in July. When the fish are in 20+ feet of water. Not holding to structure. Following bait fish on a lake system. Different ballgame isn’t it……


A finder will show you underwater drops/humps where fish hold. They will show bait balls and schooling bait fish that larger fish will be following. They will show you bottom composition that fish may like. All of this could never be determined without a finder. Cruising around in a canoe or boat you would have no clue what’s going on below you without one.


Once my waters warm on my lake system I require all my guides to take finders to the out-lakes to help find fish. Drop-shotting is one of our best methods but without electronics you wouldn’t have the first clue where to start. Even if you think you know the waters, fish move! A nice unit will be worth its weight in gold. You have a short time to fish and enjoy your vacation. Why jerk around looking for the fish.


-FT
"


Thanks you just convinced me to get one :), it makes sense. Now only if i could get a portable one with a double AAs. I wonder how difficult the lead acid ones would be to keep in the canoe. I am just scared of water and short circuits lol
Moonman
distinguished member(842)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2016 01:32PM
quote Saberboys: "I've been in the market for an affordable fish finder as well, and trying to weigh features vs. cost as it will only be used for the BW and ice fishing.


I found the standard black and white Lowrance X-4 at Fleet Farm for $69.99 and a color Lowrance Elite 3X DSI (down scan imaging) for only $90! Seems like a heck of a deal for the improved imaging and it states that the draw is still only 10-17 volts. The operating frequency is 83-200kHz, I'm not sure if I should be paying attention to any other numbers to figure out if I can get a weeks worth of battery life running on Moonman's 10 AA battery set up or not??"


Get the x-4. When I was looking a few years ago, it was on the short list between it and the garmin echo 100. As for current draw, it is measured in milli amps, and it is based on current draw in milli amps per hour of use. It is in the x4 manual. Not sure if it is still on the Lowrance website. I do have a copy somewhere, but it is on an old computer that is sitting in the basement..as MagicPaddler said, people get these units for lowest current draw, not features, although the x-4 is still a great unit.

Moonman.
Moonman
distinguished member(842)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2016 01:37PM
quote FishermanTed: "Someone asked are fish finders necessary. Yes. No matter where you fish.


10 years ago I would not have said that. Then I bought a fishing lodge and now do this professionally. Meaning, I make a living making sure guests catch fish. And guide plenty. All summer long. In all types of weather. All conditions.


Here is what I learned when I became a paid professional. I knew a lot less than I thought I did. A lot. Why? Because like many I always went fishing when it was the easiest time to do so. Most productive. I thought I was pretty darned good. Until I was taken out of my element. New water. Different season. Variable conditions. A shock to the system for sure.


Half of fishing is presenting the bait, finesse, hook setting, fighting the fish etc. But the other half is finding the fish. A fish finder is invaluable and should be on everyone’s boat that is serious about wanting to catch fish. In June you think you are the man because you catch lots of fish. Well, it doesn’t get much easier than that. Come back in July. When the fish are in 20+ feet of water. Not holding to structure. Following bait fish on a lake system. Different ballgame isn’t it……


A finder will show you underwater drops/humps where fish hold. They will show bait balls and schooling bait fish that larger fish will be following. They will show you bottom composition that fish may like. All of this could never be determined without a finder. Cruising around in a canoe or boat you would have no clue what’s going on below you without one.


Once my waters warm on my lake system I require all my guides to take finders to the out-lakes to help find fish. Drop-shotting is one of our best methods but without electronics you wouldn’t have the first clue where to start. Even if you think you know the waters, fish move! A nice unit will be worth its weight in gold. You have a short time to fish and enjoy your vacation. Why jerk around looking for the fish.


-FT
"


Hey Ted, hope all is well. Just to be clear, when I mentioned not to bother getting a finder, it was only because the person asking said they didn't really fish outside the BW at all. I agree a finder is an invaluable tool, for all those reasons you stated - thats why I use one myself. Also, your comment about fish moving is right on. I know some systems that I know like the back of my hand up here in Ontario and its incredible sometimes where the fish are. A lot of people don't realize how much available structure (therefore baitfish and bigger fish) will change from year to year, just from catastrophic storms, newly placed downed trees in the middle of nowhere etc etc. also, a really deadly technique I have been using for lakers lately is vertical jigging. Just like you were ice fishing. On calm days in spring in canoe country, you can jig and tease up the lakers, getting them to chase your lure and hit, just like ice fishing. On my little garmin echo 100 I can easily see my jig down 50-60 feet (or more), and I can see fish reponding to it. Sometimes I can yell out to my canoe partner exactly when a fish is gonna hit because I can see it chasing my lure on the screen. Its awesome!

Moonman.
Moonman
distinguished member(842)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/01/2016 01:47PM
quote Saberboys: "I've been in the market for an affordable fish finder as well, and trying to weigh features vs. cost as it will only be used for the BW and ice fishing.


I found the standard black and white Lowrance X-4 at Fleet Farm for $69.99 and a color Lowrance Elite 3X DSI (down scan imaging) for only $90! Seems like a heck of a deal for the improved imaging and it states that the draw is still only 10-17 volts. The operating frequency is 83-200kHz, I'm not sure if I should be paying attention to any other numbers to figure out if I can get a weeks worth of battery life running on Moonman's 10 AA battery set up or not??"


Also, I wouldn't be calling this 'Moonman's setup', as I got the idea from another forum, and originally had an 8 AA battery set up. It was a post on tjis forum from Ragged that put me on to the much better idea of using 10 batteries. Lots of guys have converted their units to AA power, and also lots have researched and use better batteries. Again, tons of info here if you dig deep enough.

Moonman.
adibee
senior member (66)senior membersenior member
 
03/01/2016 10:42PM
I just wanted to update everyone that after going through different types of fish finders I finally found one that fits my bill. I got the Hummin Bird Fishin' Buddy 130. It uses 6 AA batteries and suppose to run for 30 hours. It comes with a mount and the transducer is inside a tube that can be mounted on the side of the canoe. This is going to be a big plus for me since I don't have a canoe and rent one every time I am in the BWCA. It's a black and white one with Side Finder which is suppose to be pretty good. I am excited :)
mfl1776
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
03/02/2016 07:55AM
quote AFCGooner: "I was interested in this "Deeper Fishfinder" tow behind ball.
https://buydeeper.com/deeper


I just don't know if I want to carry another device (phone/tablet) to use it. I haven't pulled the trigger yet, so I'm glad you asked. "


My friend has this and has played around with it in the pond behind his house. Not exactly the best testing grounds for the B-dub, but he loves it. The phone app shows you all the info a traditional fish finder would show you and more. He has successfully targeted carp and catfish with it. I could see this being useful in the B-dub. Of course, you have the added hassle of keeping your phone charged (not difficult with a good power bank) and hoping your bluetooth holds up (which it should). But it's a neat little device. I'll try my friend's out soon and post a review here.
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1578)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/02/2016 07:58AM
I love my depthfinder. I have caught more fish because it comes along.

I have an X67 Lowrance icemachine. It works great. Shoots right through the bottom of my kevlar canoe.


mfl1776
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
03/02/2016 08:03AM
Has anyone used this:



Venterior Portable Wired Fish Finder LCD Display Sonar Sensor Fishfinder Alarm Transducer Fishfinder

Venterior Portable Wired Fish Finder LCD Display Sonar Sensor Fishfinder Alarm Transducer Fishfinder
newguy
distinguished member (227)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/02/2016 09:01AM
Mad_Angler, how do you power that X67 given the color screen?
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1578)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/02/2016 09:16AM
quote newguy: "Mad_Angler, how do you power that X67 given the color screen?"

The ice fishing ones come as a complete kit. It has a battery that lasts about a typical BW week.

johnsoner
member (16)member
 
03/02/2016 10:14AM
quote adibee: "I just wanted to update everyone that after going through different types of fish finders I finally found one that fits my bill. I got the Hummin Bird Fishin' Buddy 130. It uses 6 AA batteries and suppose to run for 30 hours. It comes with a mount and the transducer is inside a tube that can be mounted on the side of the canoe. This is going to be a big plus for me since I don't have a canoe and rent one every time I am in the BWCA. It's a black and white one with Side Finder which is suppose to be pretty good. I am excited :)"

I too have the Fishin' Buddy. It meets the need of getting a read on depth, structure, and surface temp. My only issue is the pole itself. Keep in mind you cannot use this unit conveniently when trolling, even from a canoe, as it creates a lot of drag and will start vibrating which can make a lot of unwanted noise. You will have to lift/drop it, similar to a trolling motor, between stops. The battery life has been good, as it's lasted a full trip without replacement on both trips it's been on. Good Luck.
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1188)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/02/2016 10:56AM
quote johnsoner: "quote adibee: "I just wanted to update everyone that after going through different types of fish finders I finally found one that fits my bill. I got the Hummin Bird Fishin' Buddy 130. It uses 6 AA batteries and suppose to run for 30 hours. It comes with a mount and the transducer is inside a tube that can be mounted on the side of the canoe. This is going to be a big plus for me since I don't have a canoe and rent one every time I am in the BWCA. It's a black and white one with Side Finder which is suppose to be pretty good. I am excited :)"


I too have the Fishin' Buddy. It meets the need of getting a read on depth, structure, and surface temp. My only issue is the pole itself. Keep in mind you cannot use this unit conveniently when trolling, even from a canoe, as it creates a lot of drag and will start vibrating which can make a lot of unwanted noise. You will have to lift/drop it, similar to a trolling motor, between stops. The battery life has been good, as it's lasted a full trip without replacement on both trips it's been on. Good Luck."

To stop the wobble while trolling you need to change the shape of the round part that is in the water. Look at the picture in this link and scroll all the way to the right.

WOBBLE STOPPER

The wobble stopper is a piece of plastic folded in half and creased. Then staple the edge that is farthest from the crease shut. Open it up and slip it over the shaft and you have a exaggerated tear drop shape. I have used a clear plastic cover for a 8&1/2 X 11 piece of paper from the office supply. Don’t troll with a fishinbuddy without one.
adibee
senior member (66)senior membersenior member
 
03/02/2016 11:09AM


WOBBLE STOPPER


The wobble stopper is a piece of plastic folded in half and creased. Then staple the edge that is farthest from the crease shut. Open it up and slip it over the shaft and you have a exaggerated tear drop shape. I have used a clear plastic cover for a 8&1/2 X 11 piece of paper from the office supply. Don’t troll with a fishinbuddy without one."


Wow thanks for the idea that looks pretty good. I will try to make one for me and try it out.
adibee
senior member (66)senior membersenior member
 
03/02/2016 11:11AM



I too have the Fishin' Buddy. It meets the need of getting a read on depth, structure, and surface temp. My only issue is the pole itself. Keep in mind you cannot use this unit conveniently when trolling, even from a canoe, as it creates a lot of drag and will start vibrating which can make a lot of unwanted noise. You will have to lift/drop it, similar to a trolling motor, between stops. The battery life has been good, as it's lasted a full trip without replacement on both trips it's been on. Good Luck."


How long were your trips? Do they last at least 2 to 3 days? Also was the unit able to track fish too? I read on the Side Finder option on the 130 and was confused about how it worked. Have you used it before?
johnsoner
member (16)member
 
03/02/2016 11:48AM
The trips were 5 and 7 days, the fish finder wasn't used every day due to traveling/portaging. The "side view" is just sonar reading for fish horizontally in the water column in stead of vertical. so if it is pointed towards shore, it will show you "fish" between you and the shore. If the fish are there they will show.
Mad_Angler
distinguished member(1578)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/02/2016 12:55PM
How long were your trips? Do they last at least 2 to 3 days? Also was the unit able to track fish too? I read on the Side Finder option on the 130 and was confused about how it worked. Have you used it before?"

My unit is fairly heavy. But it lasts the full 5-7 days with running almost every day. The unit is able to track bottom features and see fish.

The battery is fairly large. But you could use 2 (or more) smaller batteries to split up the load.
adibee
senior member (66)senior membersenior member
 
03/02/2016 02:43PM

WOBBLE STOPPER


The wobble stopper is a piece of plastic folded in half and creased. Then staple the edge that is farthest from the crease shut. Open it up and slip it over the shaft and you have a exaggerated tear drop shape. I have used a clear plastic cover for a 8&1/2 X 11 piece of paper from the office supply. Don’t troll with a fishinbuddy without one."


Do you have some more pics of ur finder I wanted to get a closer look at your mod.
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1188)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/02/2016 05:12PM
quote adibee: "
WOBBLE STOPPER

"



Do you have some more pics of ur finder I wanted to get a closer look at your mod. "

I do not have any other pictures but it is easy to make. You need a piece of plastic like a page protector and a stapler and scissors.
PAGE PROTECTOR PICTURE
I do not know if this is the best protector but it lets you know what I am calling a page protector. You want a stiff protector so if you crease it will stay creased. The one I used come with a piece of black paper in them and are made by folding and creasing a flat sheet and punching holes for a 3 ring binder. Slip the protector over the round shaft of the detector and pull it so the round shaft is against the creased corner. If you have a flat piece fold it in half to get a corner. Put several staples about 1&1/2 inches from the round shaft. Go fishing.
MNRider008
member (14)member
 
03/02/2016 10:44PM
For an easily portable sonar unit there is nothing better than the marcum showdown. I have the 2.0. I bring mine on every canoe trip (boundary waters once) and it is invaluable. Runs on AA's; I always bring spares but never need them. I just use a suction cup for the transducer on the side of the canoe but it's easy to get creative. It isn't the cheapest option, but I never had to bother with separate battery packs, etc etc. You can find them on ebay or craigslist for under $150.

I originally bought it for canoe trips, but absolutely love it for ice fishing when popping holes. I can strap it around my neck and do it myself rather than have someone follow me with a clunky sonar. I can pop a few holes along a ridge, see whats there and start fishing. I also have an LX-7 when on the fish, but the showdown is what puts me on the spot.
03/03/2016 10:32AM
MP - It looks essentially like an airfoil, yeah? It makes sense that way... traveling through the water you get turbulence introduced as the pole moves through the liquid. An airfoil shape will help the water pass more smoothly around the transducer pole and reduce the turbulence, and therefore noise, created.
mapsguy1955
distinguished member(649)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/03/2016 03:10PM
I have the X-4 and it uses 8 D cells. We run it all the time on our Q trips (8 days) and have yet to run out of battery juice on a trip. That is probably 10 hours each day. The D's are heavy but you don't need to carry a backup. It works beautifully.
KerryG
distinguished member (365)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/03/2016 08:31PM
Cheapest, lightest, waterproof battery in existence ... currently - I give you Tracer Power. These are pretty amazing. The smallest one is 12V 3.5 Ah which should provide a small fish finder like the Garmin Echo 151 with about 35 hours. It weighs in at just over a pound and can be recycled more or less indefinitely or at least for thousands of cycles. For myself, I plan to get the 12V 7Ah for my longer trips, that's 70 hours of uninterrupted use at just over 2 pounds.
Tracer Power
Saberboys
distinguished member(661)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/04/2016 01:43PM
quote MagicPaddler: " Battery Holder thread "

I think that I'm going to try and replicate your battery holder set up. I am curious if there will be any issues if the brass screw terminals get wet?
mastertangler
distinguished member(5216)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/04/2016 01:50PM
quote KerryG: "Cheapest, lightest, waterproof battery in existence ... currently - I give you Tracer Power. These are pretty amazing. The smallest one is 12V 3.5 Ah which should provide a small fish finder like the Garmin Echo 151 with about 35 hours. It weighs in at just over a pound and can be recycled more or less indefinitely or at least for thousands of cycles. For myself, I plan to get the 12V 7Ah for my longer trips, that's 70 hours of uninterrupted use at just over 2 pounds.
Tracer Power "


Yo Kerry........I thought you were going to go with the Biennia power 120 watt hour power pack and a solar rechargeable system? I have bookmarked it and am waiting to place an order. I know you research these sorts of things fairly intensively so I am counting on you!

I am looking at a month in Woodland Caribou and need a rechargeable system. Don't steer me wrong! ;-)

What do you know and when did you know it?
KerryG
distinguished member (365)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/04/2016 05:05PM
Our needs are different MT. For the month I'll be paddling I doubt I'll fish more than 70 hours (that's still 20 days of 3.5 hours/day.) So for me a smaller lighter battery is going to work just fine. The Tracer power 12V 7Ah LiFePo4 is perfect. Remember my Echo 151 draws a scant .1 Ah so I'll be able to get away with a smaller battery and not have to worry about re-charging. You however, will be fishing two to three times the hours that I will and using, maybe, 4-5 times the energy doing it. There isn't a battery out there that will serve you without it being recharged along the way. So, for you, the Bioenno battery will be perfect first, because it will give you 12V 10 Ah but more importantly because it is designed to handle re-charging using solar panels. For you, MT, the Bioenno is definitely the right choice, stick with that.
mastertangler
distinguished member(5216)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/04/2016 07:17PM
Hey thanks Kerry.......seems like it would be the ticket. I might still bring some lithiums along just in case it gets cloudy and stays cloudy for several days. I am totally chomping at the bit to fish so it will be hardcore daylight to dark for a few weeks and then I can settle down ;-)
KerryG
distinguished member (365)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/05/2016 07:55AM
MT, just a reminder in case you hadn’t thought of this. Remember that you have to connect the battery to your fish finder. In my case, the pin jack that plugs into the Garmin Echo is unique to Garmin. That means that I will have to send my battery manufacturer, Tracer, a Garmin cable with pin jack so that they can make up a plug that will be compatible with their battery and jack into the Garmin. This may also be an issue for you and your fish finder. Call BioEnno, they’re very helpful guys, and find out what they’ll need to make up a compatible plug for you.
mastertangler
distinguished member(5216)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/05/2016 12:11PM
Already got that figured out Kerry.......I'm just going to twist the wire around a straightened out paper clip and jam it in whatever portal provided. No need to get all fancy!
overthehill
distinguished member(4392)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/05/2016 02:04PM
I love it.
KerryG
distinguished member (365)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/05/2016 04:35PM
quote mastertangler: "Already got that figured out Kerry.......I'm just going to twist the wire around a straightened out paper clip and jam it in whatever portal provided. No need to get all fancy! "
Well at the very least that should straighten your hair out and I mean all your hair.
mastertangler
distinguished member(5216)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/05/2016 07:46PM
OK......here is a dopey question.......

Thinking about taking a Kindle along. I can charge via the Bioenno? Or the solar charger?



KerryG
distinguished member (365)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/05/2016 10:23PM
quote mastertangler: "OK......here is a dopey question.......


Thinking about taking a Kindle along. I can charge via the Bioenno? Or the solar charger?



"
The Bioenno can charge both 5V (usb) and 12V devices so you should have no problem (other than straightening out paper clips.) On the other hand for your Kindle you might just want to take one of these, it's tiny and will charge your Kindle at least three full times. Anker power pack
mastertangler
distinguished member(5216)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
04/06/2016 08:38PM
Kerry you really are a helpful sort of fellow.......although you do seem rather adept at spending my hard earned cash. I have never owned a kindle device but a month in the bush solo without reading material seems unsettling.

Yes I like the Anker power pack and by George I do believe it will do rather nicely. Thanks.

Hey, wait a minute.......have I hijacked another thread! Blimey!

Back to regularly scheduled programing.......
ockycamper
distinguished member (470)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/07/2016 06:44PM
Signstek FF-003 Portable Fish Finder I saw this one on Amazon

It is powered by 4 AAA batteries.

Anyone familiar with these? Singstek FF-003 Portable Fish Finder

ockycamper
distinguished member (470)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/07/2016 06:49PM
there is also a grayscale one.

Signstek FF-009 Portable Fish Finder
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1188)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/08/2016 06:06AM
No experience but in the question and answer on the web page you supplied it indicates batteries ½ consumed after 8 hours for the non color unit. That is only 4 AA batteries so that is not too bad.
starman
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/08/2016 10:58PM
seems to be a lot of recommendations for the x-4 unfortunately it is no longer made and not available anymore.
starman
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/09/2016 06:23PM
I just checked the Humminbird website and they claim the PirahnaMax 197C uses 170ma of power, the same as the grayscale Lowrance x-4.
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1188)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/10/2016 07:39AM
Although it is probably true that both units draw the same power with the back light on the color unit will require the back light on to see the screen. The new units have LED back lights which is much more efficient than the old units. With the new units having the back lite on only increases the current draw by a little more than double.
TallMatt
distinguished member (366)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/10/2016 08:34AM
quote mastertangler: "OK......here is a dopey question.......


Thinking about taking a Kindle along. I can charge via the Bioenno? Or the solar charger?
"


I have an almost 5 year old Kindle that I read at least 1 hour a day at home and only have to charge it like once a month. I've never had it die on camping/hunting/fishing trips, but make sure to charge it beforehand.
GwenLopez
 
07/12/2017 04:51AM
quote john 800: "What is out there now as far as a small lightweight fish/ depth finder that would work on a canoe trip? I have had Humminbird smartcasts in the past but they never lasted more than 1 or 2 trips.


"


Use Deeper smart sonar pro. Its great and probably the best portable fish finder with a proven track record. Bur you will get connection problems with it as it operates on wifi. Going beyond limits will make it less effective.
Oneofmanyblessings
senior member (57)senior membersenior member
 
07/12/2017 09:54PM
check out gander mountain store closing
just picked up piranha max 175 for $49
couldnt pass up to bring to quetico.
to try it out for that price

now just need to make battery pack
read somewhere to look for soldered connections ones as they have less power loss from each connection point
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13066)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
07/12/2017 10:10PM
I just scored a Lowrance Hook 4 with a (USA software chip for free). It was on sale last week at Fleet Farm. I tryed it out last weekend and I really like it. The color screen is amazing. It has downscan imaging, sonar, and GPS. I set it up to be used as a portable unit that is self contained that fits in an old small tackle box.
PapaBear1975
senior member (75)senior membersenior member
 
07/16/2017 03:32PM
I was going to buy a graph-style fish finder for my trip in September, but I've settled on hauling my Marcum LX-5 that I use for ice fishing on this trip. The route and distance I am going is pretty much just a couple portages and mostly paddling anyway. If I was by myself, I would pack my Showdown Ice Troller which runs on AAA's, but the Marcum is more powerful, and shows more in color. I like flasher units on open water....call me old fashioned, but that's what I learned to walleye fish with as a kid. I work at Interstate Batteries part time, so I am getting an extra SLA, and taking a small solar panel to charge them up (just in case) so we have non-stop fun for several days- though I am certain the batteries will get us through all 5 days of fishing. Mainly I just want to see where the drop offs, humps, etc are and where the fish are, and the flasher will do that as well- and I have the benefit of fishing vertically like I am ice fishing- I am packing one of my walleye "hole hopping" rods along I use in the winter.
Stars77
 
10/03/2017 03:53AM
Hi,

Try Lowrance 000-11785-001 HDS-7 GEN3 Insight Fishfinder which is rated as one of the top six fish finders . It is a superb product that comes with a sophisticated functionality. It is associated with many useful features that can help you to detect more fish. The user interface of this device works like a charm it can be operated either with a full keypad or using the sophisticated multi-touch system. You can switch between these two modes depending on your personal preference. It has an HD Sonar scan system to provide you clearer, accurate and better information about the fish underwater. In fact, Lowrance Gen3 is among the fastest scanners in the modern industry. Any user will find this device very easy to install. Internal GPS antenna, pre-installed charts for US waters and fully loaded 83/200 KHz transducer makes this fish finder a prominent choice.



Regards.
mastertangler
distinguished member(5216)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/03/2017 06:47AM
I know a commercial when I hear one. Who talks like that but a salesman?

But I admire your spiel. I have a pretty good one myself so out of mutual respect I will give a peek at the product since I am in the depth finder buying mode.
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1188)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/03/2017 07:02AM
And here is a battery that will power it for your trip
https://www.foreverpureplace.com/12-125-13-b-FLA-p/12-125-13-b.fla.htm
It only weighs 2/3 ton.
ockycamper
distinguished member (470)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/03/2017 09:46AM
I have a Cuda 242 portable black and white fish finder only used on one trip if you are interested. PM me
mastertangler
distinguished member(5216)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
10/03/2017 11:25AM
quote MagicPaddler: "And here is a battery that will power it for your trip
https://www.foreverpureplace.com/12-125-13-b-FLA-p/12-125-13-b.fla.htm
It only weighs 2/3 ton.
"


Ha! Thats funny! And only 7,000 plus dollars! (Does that include portage monkey?)

Surprise, surprise I did spend about 20 minutes on Utube checking out the Lowrance HDS7 touch screen........soooo sweet!
The battery pack I am lugging around now goes close to 3 lbs and along with the solar panel which is probably another 3 lbs I feel I need to use something which has a bit more power usage to justify carrying them. The lowrance I use now barely puts a dent in the power pak and thats after 15+ days. Why not get a "funnerer" unit? I can mark that rock pile with a GPS waypoint and I can mark that reef and mark that big school of Lakers I seen yesterday ("I know they are around here somewhere" ;-)

They want $8 bills for the unit. If I hadn't just bought a new car I would seriously think about it and get an extra transducer and use it for my tin walleye boat as well. But alas, I had to bribe my wife so I can go again next year for more than a couple of weeks. Its expensive going canoeing!!
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1188)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/03/2017 12:23PM
Lowrance sells a Grayscale MARK-4. I think it comes in 2 versions. One with and without the downscan transducer. They sell for about $125 without the downscan transducer and about $325 with. I have not tested this unit but I believe it would be a good unit and not consume lots of battery power.
Does anyone have one they can measure current draw while operating.
I know it not for MT.
MNRider008
member (14)member
 
10/03/2017 01:11PM
I mentioned it above but seriously check out the Marcum Showdown. That little unit is sweet and runs on AAs. It lasted me a full week on one charge, but it's simple enough to bring more AAs (I use rechargeables) as needed.

I use it primarily for popping holes during ice fishing season (wear it around the neck to check depth as I go), but it works fantastic in the canoe. My two cents.
rpike
distinguished member (135)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/04/2017 11:15AM
I used the Hawkeye Fishtrax 1C for the first time this spring. It worked very well. It's a color unit but you can set it to grayscale to conserve power. It's small, very light, easily portable. It runs off 4 AAA (yes, triple-A) batteries. I used lithium batteries and did not change them in four days (about 4-5 hours/day). I was running mostly in grayscale mode.

At first I tried simply towing the transducer along. That gave poor results; shooting through the hull (simply by setting it on the hull) was much better. I lost water temperature, but it's a easy to drop the transducer overboard to get a temperature reading. The way the transducer cable and float is set up, it is also easy to drop down and get a temperature reading a few feet under the surface.

I got the accessory case for it, which is small, light, and stores the unit plus an extra couple sets of batteries.

I'm happy with it. It's not perfect, but is a good unit that is really meant to be portable.

http://www.hawkeyeelectronics.com/fish-finder/
Yaya1
 
10/13/2017 04:15AM
quote john 800: "What is out there now as far as a small lightweight fish/ depth finder that would work on a canoe trip? I have had Humminbird smartcasts in the past but they never lasted more than 1 or 2 trips.


"

Hi

You can try Garmin echoMAP CHIRP 53dv with transducer,its rated as one of the
best fish finders in the market.
scoobe421
member (10)member
 
01/03/2018 11:03PM
I am also considering a fish finder for our july trip this yr. as usual we r renting canoes and gear. Whats the best way to mount a transducer?
RackWrangler
senior member (79)senior membersenior member
 
01/04/2018 02:47AM
No need to mount it. It will shoot right through the hull of the canoe (provided it is not trying to shoot through any of the thick areas like the foam or other reinforcements that companies add). I have used mine right through the hull of my 20 year old fiberglass Golden Hawk canoe for several trips, and through Kevlar rental ones for the last three years. There are several options to help it shoot through the hull, but the simplest is to just make sure that the transducer sits in a little water. I'm the heavier guy in our canoe, so there's usually plenty of water in the canoe by me.
Other people use sandwich bags filled with water, held up by a stiff plastic sleeve, or plumber's putty, or ... too many to list. A quick search should get you lots of ideas.

-RW
 
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