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BearDown
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02/27/2014 01:06PM
I use a el cheapo cannister stove, and its on my list of things to upgrade. (its a long list...) You all helped so much with picking out my MSR flex pots, I thought I would crowd source again. I want something decent sized but, I'm not looking for anything super lightweight. It being powerful to cook a good Lake Trout Chowder is important to me, as is it being stable enough to support a heavy chowder without worry. I'm not against a cannister stove, but think I would prefer a multi-fuel stand alone stove. So far I am thinking of a MSR Dragonfly

ALso a few questions. I know you need a bottle to hook up to the stove, but can you carry extra fuel in anything that is soft sided? Is it easy to keep it presurized?
 
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02/27/2014 01:28PM
I have an MSR whisperlite Universal (takes pretty much anything liquid as fuel). It stays pressurized well enough to cook on. Some people don't like the lack of flame control on it, but you can make it work if you're careful. As for soft sided fuel containers...Not sure.
OldGreyGoose
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02/27/2014 01:48PM
"I'm not against a cannister stove, but think I would prefer a multi-fuel stand alone stove."
BearDown, did you have a separate tank-type stove before the canister? Just curious. I did, and now that I've switched to canister (about 5 years ago?) I would never go back. Just my 2 cents. --OGG
02/27/2014 02:17PM
Dragonfly
old style WindPro

Personal preferences for me. The canister is simpler lighter. Liquid gas has never failed me and works much better below freezing, and cheaper. Both have large pot support and great flame adjustability.
One advantage of liquid fuel over canister is packability. More fuel per cubic storage space particularly on a long trip.
Most multi fuel stove owners I know pick a fuel type and never change. They are more expensive more complicated.
If I had to go multi

butthead
02/27/2014 02:31PM
Dragonfly is not the only stove, but it's pretty popular and there's probably a reason for that. I use one, like it a lot. I got some extra fuel bottles on Ebay a couple of years ago for a good price. I don't know of a soft container suitable for fuel but I've also never looked for one, maybe someone else knows. I also have a Pocket Rocket for backup and weekend floats, I like that little stove a lot, too.
OldFingers57
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02/27/2014 03:39PM
First off I would suggest that you match the stove to the cook set you have. By this I mean if you have a wide pot then get a stove with a large headed burner to it. If the pot is narrow then get a stove with a small headed burner to it. If you have a wide pot and use a small headed burner it could ruin your pot or fry pan as you are concentrating the heat in a small area. If the pot has a nonstick finish this can ruin it when the stove is on high.
Personally I prefer a canister stove over a liquid fuel stove. I have multiple stoves. Snowpeak Giga power, MSR Whisperlite, and MSR Windpro along with alky stoves. Also had a MSR Pocket Rocket but sold it off to get the Snowpeak. I use the Whisperlite during the winter or in really cold temps as it's a pain to prime and my wife hates it that she can't start it. So canister stoves are just easier to start and no mess with the liquid and you don't have to worry about leaks.
As to soft sided containers for fuel I don't know of any. MSR used to have a plastic fuel bottle and stopped make them as some had gotten to warm and melted/deformed thus not very safe.
wetcanoedog
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02/27/2014 03:45PM
a Peak Feather is a good Coleman gas stove.a big wide burner that can be cut way back to a simmer without going out,a problem i have had on Gaz stoves.it's very solid with feet that give it a solid base and the pot stand can take the weight of a big pot.i have had a 3 quart billy on mine.it's simple to light and run and Coleman fuel at the big box shops run under $10.
there seems to be a turn tword mountain climbing stoves that are really made to melt large amounts of water.big roaring burners and made light weight for the climbers.i used a Peak for many years and have just gone to the cheap Gaz stoves from China just to see if and how they work,i take a small back up Coleman fuel stove.
when i took a Whisperlite on buddy trips as a extra stove to cook for three guys i kept the MRS bottles in zip locks in the center of the food pack without any hassle.we even took an extra bottle with the pump in it ready to go,buddy had a extra pump.
Jeemon
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02/27/2014 05:00PM
We've done well with a two burner primus. The light weight folding version. I forget the name. Having two burners and an ability to top with a large grill top is useful for more than 4 people. Also carry a snow peak giga w/starter, but not as stable for obvious reasons. Njord2
Doughboy12
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02/27/2014 05:11PM
Link Optimums NOVA Plus...
bojibob
distinguished member(3382)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2014 05:27PM
quote maxxbhp: "Dragonfly is not the only stove, but it's pretty popular and there's probably a reason for that. I use one, like it a lot. I got some extra fuel bottles on Ebay a couple of years ago for a good price. I don't know of a soft container suitable for fuel but I've also never looked for one, maybe someone else knows. I also have a Pocket Rocket for backup and weekend floats, I like that little stove a lot, too. "

I'm a DragonFly guy also.... reliable, simmers and roars.
pamonster
distinguished member(1009)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2014 05:28PM
Snowpeak LightMax

So compact when folded down, so light all the time :) Runs great on low-high
mgraber
distinguished member(722)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2014 06:09PM
quote OldGreyGoose: " "I'm not against a cannister stove, but think I would prefer a multi-fuel stand alone stove."
BearDown, did you have a separate tank-type stove before the canister? Just curious. I did, and now that I've switched to canister (about 5 years ago?) I would never go back. Just my 2 cents. --OGG"


++++++1!!! Neither would I.Canisters are quieter, less smelly, lighter,more reliable, cleaner burning, more adjustable,no pumping, and lights instantly.The only downside I can think of is fuel cost, and that is a tiny cost compared to everything else. My vote is for the msr wind pro 2. 6.6 ounces, inverted cannister capability for cold weather,wind screen and bottom reflector, holds 10 inch pans,and is wonderfully adjustable.
marsonite
distinguished member(2124)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/27/2014 06:22PM
quote mgraber: "quote OldGreyGoose: " "I'm not against a cannister stove, but think I would prefer a multi-fuel stand alone stove."
BearDown, did you have a separate tank-type stove before the canister? Just curious. I did, and now that I've switched to canister (about 5 years ago?) I would never go back. Just my 2 cents. --OGG"



++++++1!!! Neither would I.Canisters are quieter, less smelly, lighter,more reliable, cleaner burning, more adjustable,no pumping, and lights instantly.The only downside I can think of is fuel cost, and that is a tiny cost compared to everything else. My vote is for the msr wind pro 2. 6.6 ounces, inverted cannister capability for cold weather,wind screen and bottom reflector, holds 10 inch pans,and is wonderfully adjustable."


It's really a matter of personal preference. No right or wrong answer here. I went from a wind pro canister stove to the MSR whisperlight international. The cons of the canister in my mind is that it is hard to tell how much fuel you have in a canister, and thus I was always worried about running out. Plus I seemed to be collecting canisters that were 1/4 full because who wants to take a nearly empty tank on a trip. I prefer carrying liquid fuel so I can see how much I have and can carry an extra bottle.

Hard to argue with the ease of use and the simmering capabilities, but for me personally, that didn't outweigh the hassle of dealing with canisters.
kanoes
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02/27/2014 06:24PM
quote pamonster: " Snowpeak LightMax


So compact when folded down, so light all the time :) Runs great on low-high"

i just picked one up during that great sierra trading post deal...really looking forward to using it. the pot is going to be a lot more stable on the snow peak as opposed to my rocket.
BearDown
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02/27/2014 06:41PM
Some great points here. The reasons others have started are the reasons I think I may like a change. Cost of fuel, not knowing how much you have, 1/4 filled tanks all over. Also I would also like to use a heat reflector, and I've heard it's too dangerous to do that with a canister. The dragon fly looks like it would be good for wider pots like my flex 4 set, an I right in thinking that?
kanoes
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02/27/2014 06:56PM
quote BearDown: "and I've heard it's too dangerous to do that with a canister."
an on canister stove, yes. an off canister stove like the windpro, no.
yellowcanoe
distinguished member(5047)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
02/27/2014 07:03PM
quote kanoes: "quote BearDown: "and I've heard it's too dangerous to do that with a canister."
an on canister stove, yes. an off canister stove like the windpro, no."


Agree totally. I like to bake with an Outback Oven and the Windpro is superb. The canister is about six inches away to the side and you can pop your windscreen between the stove and the canister.

The Superfly I have for backup is not good for oversize pots with the canister underneath the flame
02/27/2014 08:20PM
"The dragon fly looks like it would be good for wider pots like my flex 4 set, an I right in thinking that?"

No problem with a 5 qt. pot on either, the Dragonfly 7 in. diameter pot support, or WindPro at 5 5/8ths diameter.

butthead
dagger2000
member (12)member
 
02/27/2014 08:30PM
For our family it has been the very compact MSR Pocket stove. It is smaller than a cell phone, and it only sips the canister fuels. I am always surprised by the fact that I only use 2 or 3 canisters for 4 people for a 8 day outing. I use 2 stoves, often one for coffee and one for a huge pot of bean soup (Bear Creek etc...). We take a piece of aluminum flange to form a triangle around the stove as I often use huge 3.5Qt pots on the stoves. A great low cost investment, and I do not think that 2 or 3 canisters take up much room, as they are the tiny ones, hardly any weight to them. They have never let us down...but I pack 2 just in case! :)
lindylair
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02/27/2014 09:08PM
Couple years ago my buddy and I each bought a Primus Classic stove because we wanted two stoves that we could level and set a griddle on for making meals, especially a big bacon and egg breakfast. They are about as bullet proof as a stove can get. Reliable, sturdy but a bit heavier than the lightest...oh and one more thing...super cheap! We have used them for a couple years now and they are awesome. Wider flame pattern to eliminate hot spots and a sturdy pot support. They are not the pinnacle of high tech, just reliable, cheap and effective.

Best stove ever

You can buy two for half the price of some of the fancy stove then bring a griddle and indulge.

JoeWilderness
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02/27/2014 09:37PM
quote yellowcanoe: "quote kanoes: "quote BearDown: "and I've heard it's too dangerous to do that with a canister."
an on canister stove, yes. an off canister stove like the windpro, no."



Agree totally. I like to bake with an Outback Oven and the Windpro is superb. The canister is about six inches away to the side and you can pop your windscreen between the stove and the canister.


The Superfly I have for backup is not good for oversize pots with the canister underneath the flame"


I always carry two stoves as I am always about paddling and exploring.
When it comes time to eat, I keep it simple and want it now. I carry the MSR PocketRocket and the MSR SuperFly. The PocketRocket is used mainly to boil water and I just love the Superfly's flame control for cooking. The WindPro II talked about above is on my wish list and will most likely replace the PocketRocket. Just not sure yet as it is
such a great stove for boiling water.

Most of my friends that have used multi-fuel stoves are moving away from them for reliability issues and the fact that they don't operate the same with different fuels. So, if you go liquid, pick one type and get a stove made that for specific fuel.

I too have gone the way of the canisters and they have worked well for me so far as a three season stove.
NotLight
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02/27/2014 09:42PM
Non-Dragonfly ideas...

Back row from left-to-right: SnowPeak Litemax, Soto Windmaster, Coleman 533
Front row from left-to-right: MSR Windpro II, Primus Omnifuel with Quietstove cap, Primus Omnilite Ti with Quietstove cap







This picture, from left-to-right: MSR Windpro II, Primus OmniLite Ti, Primus Omnifuel.






I really like the Windpro II (but I have not used it yet). That said, the two Primus stoves are not much bigger. Both Primus stoves will burn canister fuel or white gas (vs. Dragonfly is just white gas, and Windpro II is just canister). Both Primus stoves simmer well (vs. the Whisperlite which apparently doesn't). Thing is, the Primus stoves just don't burn canister fuel as well as the Windpro II.
bjager
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
02/27/2014 11:01PM
this stove with a lightweight griddle is my favorite, it's light, and it's great for cooking fish and potatoes.
02/28/2014 06:08AM
The windpro 2 is my favorite. Last year I got rid of the white fuel completely and i havent missed it yet. Canister is lighter, easier, and works fine in the cold if you can invert it like with the windpro.
dogwoodgirl
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02/28/2014 06:54AM
I'm pretty happy with this but I do the majority of my cooking for larger groups over the fire.
yellowcanoe
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02/28/2014 07:46AM
For Joe Wilderness and maybe others:

My WindPro I is some seven years old. We do use it alot in salt air conditions and gradually the performance suffered. For twenty bucks the guys at MSR cleaned out all the corrosion. When the stove was not working to par, boiling water took a while and every two days we (party of two) needed a new canister.

So it came as a big surprise last week long trip when over seven days we used just under two canisters..maybe a canister and 2/3. We really did get 90 minutes out of a canister. We do not burn at full tilt; we seem to get more time out of a more moderate flame.

Probably get a II when this one corrodes again as it will. But the BWCA does not have salt air.
NotLight
distinguished member(1327)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2014 07:55AM
quote yellowcanoe: "For Joe Wilderness and maybe others:


My WindPro I is some seven years old. We do use it alot in salt air conditions and gradually the performance suffered. For twenty bucks the guys at MSR cleaned out all the corrosion. When the stove was not working to par, boiling water took a while and every two days we (party of two) needed a new canister.


So it came as a big surprise last week long trip when over seven days we used just under two canisters..maybe a canister and 2/3. We really did get 90 minutes out of a canister. We do not burn at full tilt; we seem to get more time out of a more moderate flame.


Probably get a II when this one corrodes again as it will. But the BWCA does not have salt air."



Yup, what you also get with an MSR stove is this fantastic and fast customer service.

EDIT: lots of Windpro votes here. Windpro seems to have highest customer reviews of any stove on the web. Not a liquid fuel stove..., but why go against the tide? That's why I got one for winter instead of just going to white gas.

TIMMY
distinguished member (262)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2014 08:38AM
I'd strongly recommend checking out the Primus Omnifuel. It is similar to the MSR Dragonfly (which is a fine stove as well). But offer some advantages. For the same weight, you get a higher quality stove construction (my opinion), a metal and better engineered pump that will never break on you, and the ability to use liquid OR CANISTERS. That is huge in my opinion, as you can take liquid for longer trips, or for the winter, and take canisters for quick and easy NO PRIMING and NO SOOT cooking. With only buying one stove. It's on sale for $115 right now. You can use MSR fuel bottles with it. I have the Dragonfly and never use it after switching to the Omnifuel, and now I upgraded to the Omnilite (same as Omnifuel but lighter weight, a little more efficient burn). Also the Omnifuel is a little quieter, and I think it's even a little better at simmering. Only slight inconvenience is you have to switch the burner jet when you change fuel types (liquid, gas, kerosene) but they give you a tool and it takes about 1 minute. Cheers.

www.moontrail.com/stoves/primus_omnifuel.html

http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2011/03/stove-of-week-primus-omnifuel.html

ECpizza
distinguished member(1075)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2014 09:28AM
BearDown,

For what YOU say you are looking for, a Primus Multi might work for you (never tried it myself.

A DRAGONFLY will do exactly what you want, and I know that from experience. Stable enough that I use it to brew beer (3 gallons) at home. I've used it for groups of 2 to 20 in varied settings. It is also stable in less than ideal conditions.

FOR WHAT YOU WANT, I strong recommend staying away from the whisperlite... A fine stove, but not suited for what you asked for.
BearDown
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02/28/2014 10:15AM
OK you guys have me convinced, while I might still try a multi later, I think I'll look at off canister, canister stoves. Thank you, in starting a new thread about of canister ones.
GeoFisher
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02/28/2014 02:14PM
quote TIMMY: "I'd strongly recommend checking out the Primus Omnifuel. It is similar to the MSR Dragonfly (which is a fine stove as well). But offer some advantages. For the same weight, you get a higher quality stove construction (my opinion), a metal and better engineered pump that will never break on you, and the ability to use liquid OR CANISTERS. That is huge in my opinion, as you can take liquid for longer trips, or for the winter, and take canisters for quick and easy NO PRIMING and NO SOOT cooking. With only buying one stove. It's on sale for $115 right now. You can use MSR fuel bottles with it. I have the Dragonfly and never use it after switching to the Omnifuel, and now I upgraded to the Omnilite (same as Omnifuel but lighter weight, a little more efficient burn). Also the Omnifuel is a little quieter, and I think it's even a little better at simmering. Only slight inconvenience is you have to switch the burner jet when you change fuel types (liquid, gas, kerosene) but they give you a tool and it takes about 1 minute. Cheers.

www.moontrail.com/stoves/primus_omnifuel.html

http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2011/03/stove-of-week-primus-omnifuel.html

"


Yep, this is the best stove I've ever owned. I have two of them and a spare. :) :)

Later,

Geo
Me2012
distinguished member (147)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/28/2014 04:18PM
I use the Primus Omnifuel.
Have not been disappointed yet.
OldGreyGoose
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02/28/2014 05:13PM
Do the newer tank-hose-burner units ever have to be "repaired?" My Peak malfunctioned once on the 3rd or 4th day of a Q. trip. Luckily, I had a spare parts kit with me, and overhauled it. --Goose
Scout64
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02/28/2014 05:20PM
MSR Pocket Rocket - small works great.
pamonster
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03/01/2014 10:42AM
quote kanoes: "quote pamonster: " Snowpeak LightMax



So compact when folded down, so light all the time :) Runs great on low-high"

i just picked one up during that great sierra trading post deal...really looking forward to using it. the pot is going to be a lot more stable on the snow peak as opposed to my rocket."


It had to be a deal before I pulled the trigger on this little stove too, can hardly justify spending $50+ to save 6oz when I already had a stove that worked great. But it's awesome. I love having fuel, lighter, spork, and stove all my titanium pot weighing basically nothing.....11.8oz!
Pinetree
distinguished member(12303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
06/17/2016 07:06PM
A little pocket rocket is what I like. Usually cook over wood campfire,but there are occasions when a little stove works out better.
06/18/2016 02:16AM
Well I guess I'm in the minority, but I use a Coleman 533. Super dependable, will simmer down enough to use a jello mold to back in, fuel in available almost anywhere [included Canada], I always know how much fuel I have, I've cooked in a 3 gallon pot and it was stable. Not the lightest, but some good deals on E-Bay. FRED
MagicPaddler
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06/18/2016 07:12AM
For soft sided fuel container I use old pop bottles. I left fuel in one over the winter and saw no degradation. I fill the bottles almost full and squeeze most of the air out leaving space for expansion. They get packed where they will not get punctured. When empty they can be easily crushed to carry out. I have used this method for over 10 years with no problem.
I am looking at the OPTIMUS NOVA.
Chross16
distinguished member (189)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/18/2016 07:48AM
I love my primus omnifuel
06/18/2016 08:01AM
I love my JetBoil Sol!
06/18/2016 09:58AM
quote MagicPaddler: "For soft sided fuel container I use old pop bottles. I left fuel in one over the winter and saw no degradation. I fill the bottles almost full and squeeze most of the air out leaving space for expansion. They get packed where they will not get punctured. When empty they can be easily crushed to carry out. I have used this method for over 10 years with no problem.
I am looking at the OPTIMUS NOVA. "


Adventures In Stoving Nova interesting remarks on the Katadyn changes in materials.
I have an older Brunton Nova with CEJN fittings. Nice burner, packs smaller than a Dragonfly, as adjustable, bit less powerful, as noisy, as heavy. If you want new and Scandanavian build, Primus Omni Fuel is very similar and can use canister gas as fuel also.

butthead
tarnkt
distinguished member (205)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/18/2016 06:27PM
This might be a worthless post because I have nothing to compare it to but I'm a huge fan of my primus classic trail. Super cheap ($20), bombproof, no loose parts, and a wide stable platform for frying fish.

I sure there are lighter, more compact and efficient options out there, but for the price it's hard not to like.
Dances with Sheep
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06/18/2016 08:51PM
quote FOG51: "Well I guess I'm in the minority, but I use a Coleman 533. Super dependable, will simmer down enough to use a jello mold to back in, fuel in available almost anywhere [included Canada], I always know how much fuel I have, I've cooked in a 3 gallon pot and it was stable. Not the lightest, but some good deals on E-Bay. FRED"

+1..my stove as well
06/18/2016 10:09PM
Optimus hiker if you can find one.
mc2mens
distinguished member(3958)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/19/2016 10:43AM
I like the MSR Windpro and the MSR Pocket Rocket combo for my trips. The Windpro simmers and is stable, easy to use. The Pocket Rocket boils water quickly and is very compact/light - a good backpacking stove. I have a Coghlans windscreen to help block the wind.
06/20/2016 09:52AM
MP (and butthead) +1 on the optimus nova.

Mine is 9 years old, so older style, cannot comment on the newer ones, quality wise. But they are similar in how they work, which is simply great. Fuel miser, good simmer or blast furnace, can hold big heavy pots if needed, fire up every time. Not the lighest quietest ones, but get the job done easily. My .02 on problems is you need to remember to change the fuel bottle gasket, any auto store can get you right size o rings, and be careful not to lose the burner plate, it can come loose after repeated hot/cold cyles.s
06/20/2016 10:27AM
"and be careful not to lose the burner plate, it can come loose after repeated hot/cold cyles.s"

Great tip! I tend to bend mine tight with needle nose pliers, and check them often. Dragonfly, XGK, Nova, Brunton AF, all need to be checked, the Primus is held in place with a spring.

butthead
06/21/2016 07:43AM
I bend mine as well, but it still wants to wander off occasionally. If there is a design flaw, that is it with the nova. Should have some sort of keeper on there. I experimented with using a titanium leader twisted around the 3 plate holders, did not work. The hot/cool cycling always loosens the plate, eventually.

And it matches the campsite dirt exactly in color, unfortunately. Once was saved by magnet attracting it, thought it was goner, ran magnet over likely area, pingg, found it. Would have needed fire rest of week, as had no back up.
Cedarboy
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06/21/2016 10:12AM
Been round and round with stoves and different fuels. Came back to my old ,simple Coleman Peak 1 550B Multifuel. Have 2 of them. Reliable and work in sub-zero temps.
CB
GoSpursGo
distinguished member (288)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/21/2016 10:14AM
quote boonie: "I love my JetBoil Sol!"

I was surprised while reading this thread that no one had mentioned JetBoil!

Would you recommend a minimo for solo use?
06/21/2016 07:29PM
quote GoSpursGo: "quote boonie: "I love my JetBoil Sol!"


I was surprised while reading this thread that no one had mentioned JetBoil!


Would you recommend a minimo for solo use?"


I am not familiar with the minimo, but it seems more designed for cooking (with simmering ability) vs. boiling water. So if you're going to actually cook meals vs. boiling water, it would probably be a better choice for you.

My JetBoil Sol, which is pretty much like the Flash, is strictly used as a water boiler to make coffee and rehydrate dehydrated meals in the bag. For boiling water it's simple, compact, fast, efficient, works well down to 20 degrees, and is more stable than most canister stoves. For comparison, it replaced a Coleman canister stove and an alcohol stove.

So it depends on how you want to use it. There are similar stoves from other makers to consider now as well.
OBX2Kayak
distinguished member(4784)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
06/21/2016 08:12PM
The TATO Gear Element titanium wood stove is my burner of choice for about three years.

06/23/2016 01:09PM
My coffee can stove, only a burning band you can't use it, no fuel required, no saw or hatchet needed, just small twigs and smaller branches, plus it's a great heat source spring and fall.
Guest Paddler
 
11/21/2017 05:35PM
quote NotLight: "Non-Dragonfly ideas...

Back row from left-to-right: SnowPeak Litemax, Soto Windmaster, Coleman 533
Front row from left-to-right: MSR Windpro II, Primus Omnifuel with Quietstove cap, Primus Omnilite Ti with Quietstove cap








This picture, from left-to-right: MSR Windpro II, Primus OmniLite Ti, Primus Omnifuel.







I really like the Windpro II (but I have not used it yet). That said, the two Primus stoves are not much bigger. Both Primus stoves will burn canister fuel or white gas (vs. Dragonfly is just white gas, and Windpro II is just canister). Both Primus stoves simmer well (vs. the Whisperlite which apparently doesn't). Thing is, the Primus stoves just don't burn canister fuel as well as the Windpro II.
"
11/21/2017 09:43PM
Optimus Hiker. Quiet, reliable, and very tough. A little heavy but worth the carry. The only better stove is the Optimus 111B. JG
MReid
senior member (64)senior membersenior member
 
11/21/2017 10:35PM
quote Moonpath: "Optimus Hiker. Quiet, reliable, and very tough. A little heavy but worth the carry. The only better stove is the Optimus 111B. JG" That's the old Optimus 8R. I remember when they were about $30. I still have my Svea (which I bought as an Optimus 88 with the aluminum pots).
mastertangler
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11/22/2017 07:07AM
Kovea Spyder. I got wind of these at the Adventures in Stoving blog and he reviewed it quite well. Everything is perfect with this stove..........more compact than any of my MSR models folding up quite ingeniously but with just as large a burner. Simmers excellently and is low to the ground. Remote canister iso fuel.

I have to get another one as I gave it away to another artist friend who had nothing and was going to Colorado. Fortunately they are also a better price than comparable MSR models. Made in Korea I believe.
mastertangler
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11/22/2017 07:15AM
quote Scout64: "MSR Pocket Rocket - small works great. "

I own 2 Pocket Rockets and have used them for many years. A few drawbacks for doing anything other than boiling water.........The flame is concentrated in one spot. You must use a thick pan to diffuse the heat or you will burn your food. The other thing I despise about the stove is the rather small platform upon which to cook upon. If your not careful it would not be so hard to dump the contents on your foot or onto the ground. Not good! For that reason I much prefer wide bases and remote canister stoves which sit low to the ground. The pocket rocket is great for boiling water in a 16 oz stainless steel cup however and is more a backpacking stove than a canoeing stove IMO.
11/22/2017 07:39AM
Beardown, since this thread is over 3 and a half years old (weird when posts get dredged up for the he past like this—but now I am curious) now what stove did you end up buying? How did you like it?

Sorry if ya already posted a review and missed it.

T
11/23/2017 06:34PM
Dragonfly.
OldFingers57
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11/23/2017 07:02PM
quote mastertangler: "quote Scout64: "MSR Pocket Rocket - small works great. "


I own 2 Pocket Rockets and have used them for many years. A few drawbacks for doing anything other than boiling water.........The flame is concentrated in one spot. You must use a thick pan to diffuse the heat or you will burn your food. The other thing I despise about the stove is the rather small platform upon which to cook upon. If your not careful it would not be so hard to dump the contents on your foot or onto the ground. Not good! For that reason I much prefer wide bases and remote canister stoves which sit low to the ground. The pocket rocket is great for boiling water in a 16 oz stainless steel cup however and is more a backpacking stove than a canoeing stove IMO. "



You need to match the pot to the stove. A Pocketrocket has a small burner head to it so you need to use a tall and narrow vases pot on it as opposed to a wide based pot or a fry pan. For a larger burner head stove you need to use a wide based pot or pan as opposed to a narrow based pot. Using a narrow base pot on a larger burner head you’ll have the flame going up the sides.
Wick
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11/24/2017 06:45PM
How does the dragonfly mentioned in first post do burning diesel? I am a farm guy,,,have lots of diesel around.
11/24/2017 08:06PM
Diesel and automotive gas will clog and soot up any stove (it's the additives used). The Dragonfly has no scouring wire in the fuel line instead relying on an inline filter that will clog up, the jet will soot up also. For good reliability use white gas (Coleman/Crown fuel), or kerosene.
The money spent on Coleman Camp fuel will easily offset the maintenance/parts cost.

butthead
dsk
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11/25/2017 03:33AM
quote BearDown: "I use a el cheapo cannister stove, and its on my list of things to upgrade. (its a long list...) You all helped so much with picking out my MSR flex pots, I thought I would crowd source again. I want something decent sized but, I'm not looking for anything super lightweight. It being powerful to cook a good Lake Trout Chowder is important to me, as is it being stable enough to support a heavy chowder without worry. I'm not against a cannister stove, but think I would prefer a multi-fuel stand alone stove. So far I am thinking of a MSR Dragonfly "

The dragonfly is a good stove, but the pot stands does make the pot slide of to easy. You do not have to go for an expensive stove to get thet better, but the quality of an MSR, together with a good pot stand, and some kind of multifuel will soon be expensive. I have had my Optimus Nova for close to 20 years, and the newest wersion called Polaris Optifuel does even run on cannisters in addition to kerosen, coleman fuel or mix of those. It is a real multifuel, safe sturdy, not to heawy, but pretty expensive. If you calculate to have it at least for 10 years, maybe not to bad. (The Nova + is not easy to adjust, because the adjustment is made by turning the hose, avoid that!)

The last 2 years I have been useing more and more an Old Coleman Apex ii, because it is much more easy to fire up and I feel more comfortable with it. you may get one used in good shape for a fraction of the Optimus, but have to run it on coleman fuel (white gas)


quote BearDown:
"ALso a few questions. I know you need a bottle to hook up to the stove, but can you carry extra fuel in anything that is soft sided? Is it easy to keep it presurized?"
You may get plastic botles for white gas, easy to cary, but you have to use the original type of bottle when using the stove. You may keep the pressure in the botle when you have pumped it up and just pump a little more next time firing up. (this will cause a little spill of white gas when disconnecting, but it evaporates pretty fast, if you are using kerosene, it will be a mess)
Bowdier
member (13)member
 
01/11/2018 07:43PM
I love my Coleman 533..have several of the green suitcase Coleman's that I use if car camping.Did a trip herw in Florida for several days using the 533 on the Suwannee river..cooked breakfast and dinner 4 days..no problems..was thanking of outfitting myself for a trip for Florida to the BWCA and use the 533..just have to see about getting fuel
Pinetree
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01/11/2018 07:50PM
Bowdier: "I love my Coleman 533..have several of the green suitcase Coleman's that I use if car camping.Did a trip herw in Florida for several days using the 533 on the Suwannee river..cooked breakfast and dinner 4 days..no problems..was thanking of outfitting myself for a trip for Florida to the BWCA and use the 533..just have to see about getting fuel"

Welcome aboard as your first day as a member.
Mickeal
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01/12/2018 07:09AM
Stans sport Two 25,000 and one 5000 btu burners. Carried a Colman 533 for years.

DeuceCoop
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01/12/2018 09:30AM
Dang. Went to Kovea's site to look at the Spider and they have soooooo many toys.
01/12/2018 11:30AM
Who dug this one up? Maybe this will still be useful so I'll expand on my older post. I own a good number of stoves intended for various purposes since I do a good deal of backpacking and some mountaineering in addition to canoe tripping in the BWCA. I currently own an XGK ex (very similar to the dragonfly but built to be bombproof, field-serviceable, and perform better in extreme cold), a snow peak litemax (super light), an Optimus Crux (again super light but larger burner), a msr reactor (snow melting machine), and a msr windpro 2.

I can say without hesitation that if I had to choose 1 stove for everything it would be the windpro 2.

IMO the ONLY redeeming quality of white gas is its use in very cold temps. The windpro will do anything a white gas stove will do better down to about 0 degrees in my experience. I have an XGK and have had a whisperlight and a dragonfly in the past. Seeing as how I only would ever use them for cold weather camping I got a stove specifically built for that purpose now (the XGK) and got rid of the others a while back.

It's heavier than a lot of cannisters stove options, but unless weight is extremely important on a trip it's still my preference because it also does so many things better than an upright cannisters (more stable, better in the wind, better burner for cooking real food).

In the end it probably comes down to your cooking and tripping style and what you like.
Bowdier
member (13)member
 
01/14/2018 11:08AM
I love my Coleman 533duel fuel. Have used it on a few canoe trips here in Florida and at home for coffee during our powerless few days during the hurcaine this year. Starts easy adjustable flame and can hold a nice size pot.
01/14/2018 12:50PM
Thanks for the update, keth. The Windpro2 has been on my radar for a while along with the Windburner, but I'm still using the JetBoil. Of course, I'm usually solo and I just boil water to rehydrate freezer-bag meals and rarely use it below 30 degrees, although it has worked down into the 20's.

I do still have my Coleman, but it's so heavy - the stove itself must weigh more than my JetBoil does with the pot, the stand, and a fuel canister. And it's bulkier and not as simple. I think you and are alike in being willing to carry a couple of ounces extra for the simplicity, ease, and quickness. My alcohol stove sees little use these days either.
cyclones30
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01/15/2018 08:10AM
Im a little old fashioned as I used what was passed down to me, even though I'm still in my 20's. I prefer MSR liquid stoves and never had an issue with either simmer lite or whisperlite. Simmer does a better job of doing just that between the 2.


For fun we take 2 Coleman 533/peak 1 style if weight isn't a big deal.
 
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