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Rs130754
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01/27/2019 06:05PM  
I am going to purchase my own tarp at Canoecopia this year but with all the snow/cold days I have had school cancelled a lot. So, I am going to try splicing some loops into a ridge-line so I am ready when I get a tarp. Any tips? I have some Dutch bling and zing it coming along with some splicing tools.
 
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01/28/2019 11:44AM  
Wouldn't that reduce the ranges of potential adjustments. Not trying to dissuade you but if I use a ridge-line (more often I do not), 2 prussik loops and a few "mini 8 biners" work well. Allow the line to be set, then the tarp attachments can slid to a spot that works best.

butthead
 
Rs130754
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01/28/2019 11:52AM  
I might have to do some experimenting, and learn to tie a prussic as well as a truckers hitch. In my mind I am thinking of a Ridgeline bag that would keep everything contained, but the might limit me in certain situations. Thanks for the feedback.
 
MagicPaddler
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01/29/2019 07:40AM  
Look into using prussik’s like BH suggested. If you want a bag hanging from the ridge line it would interfere less with setup if it could be slid along the line then anchored in place like with another prussic. Now that I have encouraged you not to splice anything into other than the ends of your continuous ridge line let me share some splicing info. The 2 tools I have found most useful are a thin piece of wire folded in half and several cut off knitting needles. Except for the smallest knitting needles they are hollow and after the back end is cut off a line can be inserted into them and fed through another line. PRUSIK
 
muddyfeet
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02/01/2019 01:01PM  
I have a couple good splicing tools for zing-it:
Needle-nose pliers.
Splicing needle or scratch awl.
Sharpie marker.

The best tool is homemade though: a flexible splicing needle. Take a 20” length of 22ga galvanized utility wire and fold it in half around a framing nail pounded into the workbench. Chuck both free ends into a drill and twist the wire together. Cut it 6”long and file the cut end smooth. Remove the nail and Use a needlenose pliers to pinch the tip into an elongated eye. Now you have a flexible splicing tool. This is my go- to for backsplicing and making hammock loops and Whoopi slings. Amsteel is a little easier to practice with, but you can make strong splices in zing it no problem. Also works great for threading draw cords.

There are some good videos on YouTube.
 
Argo
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10/07/2021 07:06AM  
muddyfeet: " I have a couple good splicing tools for zing-it:
Needle-nose pliers.
Splicing needle or scratch awl.
Sharpie marker.


The best tool is homemade though: a flexible splicing needle. Take a 20” length of 22ga galvanized utility wire and fold it in half around a framing nail pounded into the workbench. Chuck both free ends into a drill and twist the wire together. Cut it 6”long and file the cut end smooth. Remove the nail and Use a needlenose pliers to pinch the tip into an elongated eye. Now you have a flexible splicing tool. This is my go- to for backsplicing and making hammock loops and Whoopi slings. Amsteel is a little easier to practice with, but you can make strong splices in zing it no problem. Also works great for threading draw cords.


There are some good videos on YouTube. "

Great tip regarding chucking/coiling the wire. Does that 22ga actually work with 1.73mm Zingit? It looks a bit bulky. I employed your trick with a 0.013 guitar string and it works. It's flimsy but it works.
 
Loony_canoe
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10/18/2021 01:46PM  
I bring line for ridge lines and tie outs. I slice an end loop to both end of each section of line. This allows me to have a variety of lengths without cutting and allows the main line to have sections added if I need to reach trees that are far apart. It does take more line since part of the loop uses part of the line. But It is nice not having to cut or tie line in the field. I usually take six 10 foot section, four 20 foot sections and two 50 foot sections.
The best tools are a wire bent in half, 10 inches long. A small knitting needle. ruler. Magic Marker. A very Sharp knife.
 
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