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Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Group Forum: Flyfishing BWCA
      Sink tip line     

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WillVan56
member (20)member
 
04/10/2020 09:04PM  
I have been fly fishing for 39 years, almost exclusively for warmwater species. I also worked, part time, in a fly shop for 13 years. I have never used a sink tip line until this spring. I promised myself this winter that I would give sink tip lines a shot to get my flies deeper. The water temp in my area is still in the 40's and the fishing is slow but I have stayed true to my promise and fished the sink tip on my 8wt when LM bass fishing. So far so good but I'm afraid that I'm missing strikes. When using sinking flies with my floating line, I always used a strike indicator and I could tell (usually) when a fish hit. With the fish I have caught this spring with the sink tip, I set the hook if anything looked or felt different, but I can't help believing that I'm missing fish. Any thoughts or insights?
 
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Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13568)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
04/12/2020 11:20AM  
Are you using a dedicated fly line with a sink tip already installed, or are you installing a separate lead core onto your fly line? I have a 12” and a 24” lead core line that you can attach to a line I want to try this year. But I was wondering the same thing you are. I’ll bet you miss a lot of fish without a strike indicator.
 
WillVan56
member (20)member
 
04/12/2020 02:57PM  
The line I'm using is a from the factory sink tip, I found it on clearance so I thought I would give a try. When I fish conventional tackle, I don't think I miss many strikes but there is not as much bow in the line as I have with the sink tip. I'll keep trying it and maybe I'll feel more comfortable with it the more I use it. It really doesn't matter that much because in a month I will be fishing surface flies and poppers.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13568)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
04/14/2020 10:38AM  
I watched a You Tube on sink tip with streamers. They were casting 90 deg to the stream and mending the line to keep the streamer in the zone as long a as possible. Then he kept the line tight and he said he could feel the strike. Maybe some help.
 
WillVan56
member (20)member
 
04/14/2020 11:40AM  
Thank you.
 
casualbriday
senior member (55)senior membersenior member
 
04/18/2020 06:54PM  
I'd rely on an active retrieve or even using boat drift to keep slack out of the line when it's down in the depths.

I'm considering getting a full intermediate or sink 3 line (those should be plenty of sink for creek fishing) and using a 10' extra super fast polyleader to get it down in lakes.
 
casualbriday
senior member (55)senior membersenior member
 
01/04/2021 03:52PM  
^^ I did a proof of concept test of that with a 10' airflo extra super fast sink leader on a Chinese copy of a rio big nasty line and it went approximately ok. The leader and tippet ended up being 14', so I had to start casting with the loop connection about 3' up into my guides (which mostly worked, but I had a few bad tangles when they didn't make a clean getaway. Like re-tie everything bad). When I got the timing to work out and I had a slight tailwind I was getting about 8-10' of my running line past the rod tip, so with a 54' head and 14' leader I was getting close to 70' casts standing in a boat, and I'd say I was getting 65' consistently. I also didn't get a ton of depth with it, or catch any fish (but I got bit off by a northern that felt decent).
 
Moonman
distinguished member(918)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/18/2021 08:47AM  
I would say that yes you are likely missing a few strikes/fish due to the sink tip. I’ve also been fly fishing and tying for a very long g time - 45 years lol, and have lots of assorted lined and tips. The hinge point on the line is the culprit as you no doubt know and also you seem to be using a long leader/tippet. All depends on the water you are fishing(depth and presentation) but for sure you will feel more hits on a straight sinking line with a 4-6’ leader. you will get even more fish using a full clear intermediate or clear camp slow sink line (type 1)....I can troll or cast with that line and it’s been deadly for me....application wise it opened my am eyes as to how easy it was to present a streamer to walleyes just above the weeds in 10-12’ of water....slowly paddling solo etc the fly would not get snagged and I picked up walleyes my buddy in his canoe right in front of me with a rapala could not. With the clear fly line I use a short 3-4’ length of 6-8 lb fluoro and hook sets were instant. When trolling I place the rod butt and reel over the canoe yoke with the tip extended out back behind me. I watch the rod and any twitch etc I grab the rod and line together and that’s enough to set the hook. Obviously talking about flat water here. I still use sink tips in rivers when I want to swing big streamers for steelhead and salmon but it’s more the fun of using that technique - some split shot and an indicator would be easier to use for sure. Try the clear intermediate you'll be glad you did.

Moonman.
 
Strokeofluck
member (16)member
 
02/27/2021 01:33AM  
WillVan56, I’ve been a guide for going on 15 years, both salt and fresh. Fished plenty with full sinks, intermediates, etc. Main things to remember is always keep in contact with your fly (meaning no slack line!), keep an index finger on that line with your grip hand for line management , and ALWAYS strip set when fishing any streamer pattern, meaning a fly you give motion to with your own movement of the fly line. Do those things and it’s hard to miss a hit. If your fishing in current, fish 45 degree angles down stream, let it swing or strip, and that current will help keep your line tight and you’ll feel strikes. In still water (lake,pond), just make sure you lay your casts out and get tight to the fly as soon as it hits the water, then let it sink to your desired depth and start your retrieve. The most common mistake is to not strip set, always keep stripping till you feel a solid connection to the fish then left your rod, as opposed to “trout set”, where you lift the rod, first, soon as the fish takes when fishing dries or nymphs. Hope this helps
 
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