BWCA Skillet water volume question Boundary Waters Gear Forum
Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Gear Forum
      Skillet water volume question     
 Forum Sponsor

Author

Text

MikeinMpls
distinguished member(1105)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/06/2022 09:08AM  
A question for those math and physics folks: I'm thinking about killing two birds with one stone and replacing both my old beat up frypan and small cooking pot. I'm thinking about an eight-inch Sea to Summit or Jetboil skillet. We only use a small cooking pot to boil water in for the most part.

Here's my question: if I have an 8 inch round skillet filled with water to 1 inch, what will the volume of water be? If it's 2 cups, then I might get the new skillet and use it for both boiling water and frying stuff.

Mike
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
04/06/2022 09:26AM  
h*pi*r^2, where h is height, is volume. Assume units are in inches.
One cup is 14.4375 cubic inches.

 
Loony_canoe
distinguished member (384)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/06/2022 10:31AM  
Sorry I do not have a sea to summit or Jet Boil
No math here, but I did fill them to find the volume.

I do have a GSI 8 inch fry pan. It measures 8 inches at the bottom and 8 1/2 inch's at the lip with a slightly curved outward side. it is around 2 inches tall. Two cups of water fills it about half way. Full to the brim is about 5 1/2 cups

I also have a titanium 8 inch skillet that is 1 1/2 inches tall with straight sides. It also fits 2 cups of water with room to spare. Full to the Brim is 4 1/4 cups.

They both are a bit tippy filled with water.
 
RLJ
distinguished member (126)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/06/2022 11:17AM  
Volume of a cylinder: V = h x 3.14 x r* (squared). 1 x 3.14 x 16 = 50.24 cu in
50.24 cu in = 3.48 US cups. V = volume, h = height, 3.14 is pi, r = radius (in this case
the diameter (distance across) the pan is 8 so the radius (half the distance) is 4.
So after that, filling the pan to 1" you would have about 3 1/2 cups.
 
yogi59weedr
distinguished member(2536)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/06/2022 12:49PM  
I distinctly remember missing this one on my ACT test45 years ago.
 
pswith5
distinguished member(3595)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/06/2022 03:46PM  
Adam told me there would be no math!!
 
MikeinMpls
distinguished member(1105)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/06/2022 06:02PM  
Thanks everyone. This is great information and I'm glad I asked.

Mike
 
4keys
distinguished member(856)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/07/2022 06:14AM  
I like the idea. Anything to drop weight and space.
You might want to try it at home first - pouring hot water out of a wider frypan and into a coffee cup might be a little trickier than out of a pot.
 
Argo
distinguished member (466)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/07/2022 07:07AM  
Oh dear...imperial measurements. If you had only asked in metric. Then I still couldn't help but at least you could have avoided my pedantic nattering.
 
04/07/2022 08:35AM  
I like math but also efficiency. Take 2 cups of water and pour that into a kitchen skillet or pot close to 8 inches. I bet it's less than 1/2 inch.

butthead
 
04/07/2022 09:26AM  
I agree that you would want to try this out before committing to using only a skillet. I know I'd slosh too much and spill everywhere if I were boiling water in a skillet, and that's on the stove at home. Are you going to be doing this on the fire grate or a gas stove? Either way, you might want to find a solution to the pouring problem, like a funnel or wide mouth container.
 
MikeinMpls
distinguished member(1105)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/07/2022 12:03PM  
As the OP let me say this: I recognize the difficulty I may encounter using a skillet to double as a pot. That's something I need to think about. We only use a smaller pot when we make dishes requiring two. We don't use it to heat hot water that much so pouring into another receptacle won't be a problem we face too much.

But it all fits into the calculation of composition of my cook kit.

Mike
 
04/07/2022 12:32PM  
This thread just proves there are 3 types of people in the world:


Those who can do math, and those who cannot!!

(Just having fun, sorry if I offend anyone, not my intent)
 
uqme2
senior member (98)senior membersenior member
 
04/07/2022 01:49PM  
MikeinMpls: "A question for those math and physics folks: I'm thinking about killing two birds with one stone and replacing both my old beat up frypan and small cooking pot. I'm thinking about an eight-inch Sea to Summit or Jetboil skillet. We only use a small cooking pot to boil water in for the most part.

Here's my question: if I have an 8 inch round skillet filled with water to 1 inch, what will the volume of water be? If it's 2 cups, then I might get the new skillet and use it for both boiling water and frying stuff.

Mike"


I'd reckoned the one that comes with a lid.
 
04/07/2022 05:13PM  
Mo63021: "This thread just proves there are 3 types of people in the world:



Those who can do math, and those who cannot!!

(Just having fun, sorry if I offend anyone, not my intent)
"


thats pretty funny
 
Hammertime
distinguished member (158)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/07/2022 07:49PM  
My concern with this plan would be using my frying pan to boil water.

No matter the volume I would not want to drink it. I can never get my pans clean enough, but maybe you have more success in that area.

Good luck!
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next