BWCA Use of stove inside tent? Boundary Waters Listening Point - General Discussion
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superpoff
  
05/23/2023 04:12PM  
What do you tink of this .
 
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05/23/2023 04:54PM  
Hey poof - Welcome to the board!

What would you use the stove for? Heating... get a better sleeping bag. Cooking in rainy weather... get a tarp. Just my opinion.
 
05/23/2023 05:04PM  
I tink it is foolish.
 
pleflar
senior member (71)senior membersenior member
  
05/23/2023 05:05PM  
It's a good way to justify the cost of a plb.

Seriously though, don't. Set up tarp to get out of the rain and don't set your gear and yourself on fire.
 
OCDave
distinguished member(722)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/23/2023 05:10PM  
Inside the tent is truly the most effective way to really infuse that bacon smell into the fibers of the tent material.
 
Northwoodsman
distinguished member(2059)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/23/2023 05:32PM  
Bear attractor. Don't store food in or near tent; don't cook food in or near tent.
 
05/23/2023 06:09PM  
Not worth the risk:
1) Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
2) Setting your Tent on Fire
3) Severe Burns
4) Food Odors can Attract Animals

So you could end up:
1) Dead
2) Without a functional shelter
3) With serious injuries
4) Bringing bears to your tent
 
05/23/2023 07:41PM  
Nope. Mainly too much risk of CO poisoning, but Geotramper's list is good. I recall too many instances of illness or death and that's against a fairly small base because I do not think many people do it. I remember seeing a Youtube video of some climbers doing it at one of the higher camps on Everest, and that's about the only situation where I think it could be attempted - when either going outside and not getting some hot food/drink were themselves both life threatening. Cook and prepare food out under a tarp.

CO Poisoning in tents
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(14437)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
  
05/23/2023 08:22PM  
No, don’t do this. Three things come to mind. Carbon monoxide poisoning, fire danger, and bears.
 
MichiganMan
distinguished member (233)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/23/2023 09:15PM  
Somebody's trolling, lol.
 
airmorse
distinguished member(3431)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/23/2023 10:53PM  
That's a great idea. I wish I had thought of it. Man the smell of a fish fry forever impregnated into the fibers of ones tent.
 
05/24/2023 04:36AM  
A stove inside a canvas wall tent works out well if the tent is designed for a stovepipe. It can keep you warm at night after a long day of hunting in the mountains. Someone will have to get up a few times during the night to add wood to the fire.

NOTE: I said CANVAS WALL TENT, not a nylon or polyester backpacking tent. Note that I also said HUNTING and MOUNTAINS, a place where you can drive your truck to and set up this heavy canvas tent. A good quality canvas tent made for a stove will set you back somewhere near $1000 and will weigh 100 to 150 pounds.
 
LukeMacGillie37
member (29)member
  
05/24/2023 05:29AM  
Wood stoves in tents are a classic northwoods experience. Having a fire in a conical lodge of bark, skin or canvas is as well for Natives. Having a woodstove in a tipi is something I've done on occasion, best of both worlds.

I even own one of those modern one pole conical nylon tents with a stove jack, and have a very small wood stove. Because of work I didn't get to use it for a week long hunting camp that I was going to paddle into last fall.

But none of that has much connection to canoe tripping in BWCA, which is a whole different animal so to speak.



 
05/24/2023 07:36AM  
Pretty common for climbing and winter camping, but I don't really see the point for other times of the year.
 
Tomcat
distinguished member(709)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/24/2023 07:49AM  
keth0601: "Pretty common for climbing and winter camping, but I don't really see the point for other times of the year."


Yes, it is a common practice which I have done. Understanding how and when to use equipment is important. There are risks and rewards to equipment and procedure choices. I am not promoting the use of stoves in tents but am also not excluding it as an option. Tripping styles vary as well as equipment and procedures preferences.
 
Minnesotian
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05/24/2023 09:59AM  
I have had a stove fired up in a tent plenty of times. In fact, I have tended an open fire in a tipi once which was really fun and unique.

I own a canvas Snowtrekker winter tent and a solo winter tent made from nylon. Both tents are set up to have a wood burning stove to keep them warm and to cook upon. However, I do not let the fire continue to burn after I go to bed and I don't burn any paper products in the stove.

I have fired up my canister camping stove that I bring on trips in my other tents a couple of times. Never on a canoe trip because I have a tarp and can cook there. But there have been many times while backpacking I have fired up the stove in the vestibule of the TarpTent I own due to a relentless downpour or crazy high winds. The stove is usually only fired up for about two minutes or so because it is only to heat up water for my dehydrated meals. The tent isn't so watertight that I am overly concerned about CO2 poisoning. I would never use the stove to fry fish or something like that in the tent. No matter what though, when in grizzly country, all the cooking and eating happens 200' at minimum away from the tent.
 
05/24/2023 05:28PM  
OCDave: "Inside the tent is truly the most effective way to really infuse that bacon smell into the fibers of the tent material. "


This is something you could do at home on a mildly breezily day with the tent doors open. Saves the weight of fuel and reduces the carbon monoxide risk as well.
 
05/25/2023 08:59PM  
I have used a stove to dry a soaked tent.
 
05/26/2023 09:17AM  
I have done it, one time it rained all day as I paddled. I was cold wet and freezing. I heated up some noodles in my Marmot 3P with my Jetboil, so I could warm up and fill my belly.
 
tumblehome
distinguished member(2978)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/26/2023 05:45PM  
LindenTree: "I have done it, one time it rained all day as I paddled. I was cold wet and freezing. I heated up some noodles in my Marmot 3P with my Jetboil, so I could warm up and fill my belly."


Yeah, I've used my butane stove in my tent on a cold rainy day to make a cup of coffee while I listened to the rain drops and read a book snuggled up in my sleeping bag.
Tom
 
05/27/2023 03:44PM  
If you are worried about a tent smelling like food after cooking, just hang a full bird feeder or a suet feeder outside your tent so the bear goes after that instead of the tent. EZY PEEZY.

Tom
 
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