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      Best type of rope for tying down tarp?     
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martenskier21
member (7)member
  
04/23/2024 07:17PM  
In the past, I have always used 550 paracord for tying down tarps for use as a shelter. I've noticed that many seem to be switching to alternative ropes. What would you recommend I use? I am looking for a lightweight and strong option that doesn't sag significantly when wet.
 
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soundguy0918
distinguished member (142)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/23/2024 08:04PM  
I take a variety of thicknesses and lengths...paracord, 1/4" and 1/8" polyester. The 1/8" is almost like twine but it still knots well for tying corners. Save the paracord and thicker rope for the longer spans.
 
campnfish
distinguished member(503)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/23/2024 10:42PM  
Zing it, or lash it brand, more than strong enough and won't stretch, doesn't tangle much at all. I use 1.75mm for hammock tarp and CCS lean.
 
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1492)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/24/2024 05:51AM  
If you want light weight and no stretch you can’t beat Zing it or lash it and it is strong enough for the ridge line. I find it hard on my hands for the ridge line so I use a larger amsteal for the ridge line.
 
Z4K
distinguished member (429)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/24/2024 06:34AM  
+1 for Amsteel on the ridgeline. It's tough to tie a knot in and it's hell on trees but it doesn't stretch at all. I learned a water bowline for it and use 1" nylon straps for tree contact. I keep hearing it's really easy to braid the line yourself into loops and knots etc, need a specialty needle IIRC, haven't tried that out yet but I might order it up this morning now that I'm thinking about it. I use some off brand zing-it type skinnier line for the guys. The rope I have has a great texture to it, I will tie prussiks with it onto the Amsteel and they do OK if you re-tie every time. Dyneema is some slick stuff but it really is the future, replacing steel cable in many applications around the world.
 
pleflar
senior member (71)senior membersenior member
  
04/24/2024 06:39AM  
I also use zing it/ lash it for my tarp. I'm a hammocker so my tarp is crucial.
 
EmmaMorgan
senior member (65)senior membersenior member
  
04/24/2024 07:34AM  
I’m also a zing-it/lash-it user for my tarp ridgeline and guylines. As others have said it’s very strong, lightweight, doesn’t sag and doesn’t absorb water. Since it’s not great at holding knots I spent some time this winter learning how to splice loops and incorporated some Dutchware fleaz, wasp, etc. in my tarp kit. Looking forward to trying them out this year.
 
04/24/2024 09:47AM  
I use some Lawson Equipment cordage.
 
schweady
distinguished member(8091)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
04/24/2024 10:52AM  
I use the cordage that Dan sells with his CCS tarps, both the standard yellow and the reflective variety.
 
OCDave
distinguished member(722)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/24/2024 04:15PM  
schweady: "I use the cordage that Dan sells with his CCS tarps, both the standard yellow and the reflective variety.
"


+1.

Zing-it/ Lash-it are fine if you have hardware similar to DutchwareGear's Tarp Flyz or Stingerz . If you'r prefer hand-tied knots, hitches and bends, the Cooke Custom Sewing cordage is a great choice.
 
campnfish
distinguished member(503)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/24/2024 04:52PM  
Zing-it or lash it work great with these, light, and cheap, no knots needed. Jeff sells them on ebay.

Jeff Myers Toggle
 
04/25/2024 07:09AM  
campnfish: "Zing it, or lash it brand, more than strong enough and won't stretch, doesn't tangle much at all. I use 1.75mm for hammock tarp and CCS lean."


+1
 
tumblehome
distinguished member(2980)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/25/2024 07:30AM  
I use whatever Menards has in the $2.99 bin. Rope and string is just that, anything else is marketing.
Tom
 
Dreamer
distinguished member (163)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/25/2024 09:54AM  
I grab two spools of paracord and have never thought twice about it.
 
04/25/2024 12:57PM  
tumblehome: "I use whatever Menards has in the $2.99 bin. Rope and string is just that, anything else is marketing.
Tom"


Disagree. What about stretch, abrasion resistance, load capacity, reflective material, ability to hold knots, feel, etc etc. Just because any type of rope/string could work in a pinch doesn’t mean that there aren’t advantages of one over another.
 
GeneH
distinguished member (132)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/26/2024 02:13PM  
Wellllll...here's the skinny on tarps and cordage from a guy with more internet knowedge than actual experience. (me) :-) Jeff Meyers is your go-to if you want to start learning about Zing-It, and look up, "how not to highline" on youtube. That guy shows you how and why ropes and cord of material with the same composition of zing-it, break. It slips, heats up, melts a little, then breaks.

I use, Zing-It, Lawson Equipement low-stretch lines, that white cord used on window blinds, and spooled stretchy inexpensive Atwood Mfg.

My continuous ridgeline is a pre-configured Zing It. Zing-It has like 400lbs tensile strength and looses most of it with most knots. What's 80% of 400 and who needs that much break strength anyway. Others that have posted hear already have great solutions for that with Dutchware, toggles, as well as Jeff Meyers cool, no-hardware solutions.

Lawson Equipment has the bestest reflective and non-reflective stuff. It's my go-to cordage. I don't use the reflective out front of my tarp because it's too distracting, but I do hang a line to help me find my bear canister or bear hang after dark. The stuff holds knots like nobody's business and way stronger than needed, thin, and little stretch. Doesn't tangle at all hardly, and knots can be undone, even though they won't slip under load.

Atwood stuff like their ready-rope or thinner stuff works fine. Has some stretch, not sure that's an issue, especially if you use shock cord with it. Makes great Prusiks and stuff. Used several spools over a few years.

That white window blind cord works well, but tends to tangle and knots are hard to undo.

 
04/28/2024 02:36PM  
Use Cooke Custom Sewing Poly Cord for your community tarp. Use Zing-It!/Lash-It! for your hammock fly.
 
tumblehome
distinguished member(2980)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/28/2024 05:24PM  
fadersup: "
tumblehome: "I use whatever Menards has in the $2.99 bin. Rope and string is just that, anything else is marketing.
Tom"



Disagree. What about stretch, abrasion resistance, load capacity, reflective material, ability to hold knots, feel, etc etc. Just because any type of rope/string could work in a pinch doesn’t mean that there aren’t advantages of one over another."



I’m just not passionate about rope and twine. And I don’t hammock.
If I was a rock climber I would be passionate about my rope.
But rope to tie down a tarp or for lining rapids with my canoe, just plain ole’ rope like parachute cord works like a champ for me.

There is definitely a ton of marketing in the outdoor industry.
Tom
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(2357)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/29/2024 07:45AM  

I've been using Paracord on my tarps for a long time, and it works just fine for 90% of my camping situations, but it does slip and stretch, especially in wet weather. So I am looking at replacing my ridge line at the very least, if not my guylines as well. Sidenote, for my canoe my ropes are just some diamond braid polypropylene rope that I change out every decade or so. Polypropylene floats and doesn't suck up water.

Amsteel seems intresting for the ridgeline as I like the strength, but I tie knots and know that Amsteel slips a ton, so that is out. Might use it for food hanging though, as slippery against a tree branch is a good thing and tying off means multiple wraps around a trunk so the knot isn't critical.

Lash it, zing it, Lawson, are what I am probably going to get, but I really wish they came in sizes of 1/4" or 6mm. Having worked with ropes that are 1/8" or smaller, they can saw through my hands real quick and any knots that get tight under load can be very problematic when trying to unknot.

I see that Lawson sells some rope at 5mm, and that is what I'll probably end up getting, but does there exist other options other then the tiny milimeter ropes?
 
OMGitsKa
distinguished member (386)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/29/2024 09:36PM  
zing it, you'll never go back to paracord
 
04/30/2024 06:46AM  
Last year I brought micro chord for my first trip in May and noticed after my next four trips that season that I was using it for almost everything in camp except the tarp line. Lightweight, packs small, and strong.
 
Nozzelnut
distinguished member (155)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/01/2024 09:53PM  
I'm a paracord kind of guy; usually. I added 2 cam-buckle straps a couple years ago; instead of all 4 corners having cordage. Tensions very easily!
 
WCbackpacker
member (6)member
  
05/02/2024 08:47AM  
Arborist throw line from Atwood rope. Zero stretch, abrasion resistant, holds and releases knots well, and it's very affordable.

https://atwoodrope.com/collections/arborist/products/arborist-throw-line-neon-orange-1
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(2357)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/02/2024 03:54PM  
WCbackpacker: "Arborist throw line from Atwood rope. Zero stretch, abrasion resistant, holds and releases knots well, and it's very affordable.


https://atwoodrope.com/collections/arborist/products/arborist-throw-line-neon-orange-1"


Like the different sizes they offer. Thanks for the suggestion, this might be what I am looking for.
 
05/02/2024 06:30PM  
WCbackpacker: "Arborist throw line from Atwood rope. Zero stretch, abrasion resistant, holds and releases knots well, and it's very affordable.


https://atwoodrope.com/collections/arborist/products/arborist-throw-line-neon-orange-1"


Nice recommendation, I don’t think I’ve heard that sugesstion before.
 
WCbackpacker
member (6)member
  
05/02/2024 06:35PM  
When I was choosing a rope for my tarp guylines I emailed Atwood and received excellent advice from them, so i encourage you to do the same if you're on the fence.
 
brotherbear
member (50)member
  
05/09/2024 07:23AM  
I really like this option from Dutchware. The hookworms work great for easy adjustments as needed. Adding the shock cord loops to the tarp ties everything together nicely giving the little stretch but bounce back and keeps things taut.
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(2357)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/09/2024 08:11AM  
WCbackpacker: "Arborist throw line from Atwood rope. Zero stretch, abrasion resistant, holds and releases knots well, and it's very affordable.


https://atwoodrope.com/collections/arborist/products/arborist-throw-line-neon-orange-1"


Just an update. Got in an order from them yesterday and it looks exactly was I was looking for. I ordered the 3/16" Static Rope in black at 100' for my ridgeline and got 200' of reflective arbor throw line 1.8mm for my corner tie-outs. After shipping it came out at $42.

The static rope especially looks good. Low stretch, still big enough to grip, and can tie knots into it very well.

Thanks much for the recommendation.
 
WCbackpacker
member (6)member
  
05/09/2024 08:30AM  
Awesome!
 
Thabstarbod
  
05/10/2024 07:10PM  
I usually use EPDM rubber straps to tie down tarps. They are effective in almost every situation.
 
StLouisPaddler
senior member (82)senior membersenior member
  
05/12/2024 02:22PM  
boonie: "I use some Lawson Equipment cordage."


+1 on Lawson Ironwire and Glowire. Zing it is cool stuff, but as others have mentioned it is not meant to take a knot. The dutchware hardware works really well with it. But my worry has always been losing a hardware fastener in the field. If you’re on here, you probably think ahead and bring spares and it’s no big deal. Lawson cordage is as strong as it needs to be, low stretch, and knots and unties well.

Glad to see so many people with firm opinions on cordage!
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(2357)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/20/2024 08:34PM  
Minnesotian: "
WCbackpacker: "Arborist throw line from Atwood rope. Zero stretch, abrasion resistant, holds and releases knots well, and it's very affordable.



https://atwoodrope.com/collections/arborist/products/arborist-throw-line-neon-orange-1"



Just an update. Got in an order from them yesterday and it looks exactly was I was looking for. I ordered the 3/16" Static Rope in black at 100' for my ridgeline and got 200' of reflective arbor throw line 1.8mm for my corner tie-outs. After shipping it came out at $42.


The static rope especially looks good. Low stretch, still big enough to grip, and can tie knots into it very well.


Thanks much for the recommendation. "


Just another update. Was able to go camping last weekend and set up the tarp, swapping out the parachute cord for the 3/16" static line for the ridgeline, and the 1.8mm for the corners.

The static line is exceptional. I had some good wind gusts on Saturday, 20mph or so, and the tarp was taking a pretty good broadside to the wind. That static line did not loosen or budge. Very satisfied with that upgrade.
I am still on the fence with the 1.8mm. It held up just fine in the wind, and ended up slipping a bit with some force. I was using a taut-line hitch. I actually appreciated the slippage in the corners, as it may have relieved some extra tension from the wind blasts.

Either way, this was an overall upgrade that I would do again. I still have 50' left of the 3/16", so I will proably make some new painter lines for the canoe. Thanks much.
 
WCbackpacker
member (6)member
  
05/20/2024 10:04PM  
Now I'll need to try some static line! About those guylines, try the trucker's hitch, it'll provide some more grip.
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(2357)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
05/21/2024 07:20AM  
WCbackpacker: "Now I'll need to try some static line! About those guylines, try the trucker's hitch, it'll provide some more grip. "


Yeah, I use the trucker's hitch along with a siberian hitch on the ridgeline, so I am familiar. I just like how quick the tautline can be tied, but you are right, it does slip more then the truckers.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(14437)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
  
05/21/2024 09:02AM  
I switched to Atwood micro cord for most tarp and tent needs. It does the job very well. 100 pound strength is just fine for this. Tie a slip knot so you can untie the cordage. Or just cut it because it is so cheap.
 
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