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Bkorwi
member (7)member
  
06/18/2024 06:03PM  
Hello,
I was looking at waterproof storage solutions for canoeing. Came across all manner of dry bags, pelican type boxes, and barrels. I was looking for something that could hold several 3700 boxes while still providing easy access and not be too heavy.

I first found these for $180 each, ouch: Buzbe Tote

Then I did a random search for IP68 containers. I came across the menards waterproof storage tote for about $30 after tax and rebate.

Menards tote

Home depot has a similar HUSKY one but it only IP65, 68 is submersible.

Same deal for most tool boxes from milwalkee, ridgid, dewalt, etc. IP 65 only.

The seals on the Menards boxes are pretty beefy. It actually makes it hard to close. Should stay nice and dry. They are also WAY lighter than a pelican case, but also feel a good deal stronger than typical Tupperware. I picked up 2 if the 12 gallons as they fit PLANO 3700 boxes laying down really nicely. Could do smaller boxes latches up.

You cold definitely get more in the 20 gal. However the 20 gal is taller, and the tapered nature of the nesting box makes the 20 gal box a bit narrow for 3700 boxes on the bottom. I don't have a use for the 5 gal yet.

The lid is weak point on these, wish they were made strong enough to sit on without risk of cracking. Thinking for the price I could reinforce it a bit and have a lightweight Pelican type box.

I'm planning to use the box for all my BWCA fishing gear save the rods. Ideally That means plano boxes, fish finder & battery, rod holders, stringer, lip grip, line and any other odds and ends.

I'm thinking I could even rig it up as a backpack for portaging. Bottom is pretty much flat.

I didn't see any other online info on these boxes so I thought I'd share.

If you use totes for BWCA or have really good reasons not to, chime in, I'd love to hear from you.


 
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Jackfish
Moderator
distinguished member(7915)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
06/18/2024 07:08PM  
I’ll jump in on this… but first, welcome to BWCA.com! Lots of experienced canoe trippers here that will share lots of helpful advice as you plan your trips.

My first question is how much experience do you have doing canoe trips in the wilderness?

Secondly, why are you looking at plastic totes for your gear instead of time-tested canoe packs?

And third, how much fishing gear were you planning to bring? I think that most anglers on this board will admit that they bring, or used to bring, too much fishing tackle. It's easy to overthink the need for fishing lures, etc. I used to bring WAY too much fishing tackle until I finally realized that solid pre-trip planning helped me keep the bulk and weight of that stuff to a minimum. Obviously, you have to carry it all and have room for all your other gear, too.

 
Bkorwi
member (7)member
  
06/21/2024 10:59AM  
Update on these, they do seal! Left in my car and it was cold this morning and they were all sucked in like a gas can.

They may benefit from a small equalization valve like a pelican.
 
Bkorwi
member (7)member
  
06/21/2024 11:02AM  
Jackfish: "I’ll jump in on this… but first, welcome to BWCA.com! Lots of experienced canoe trippers here that will share lots of helpful advice as you plan your trips.

My first question is how much experience do you have doing canoe trips in the wilderness?

Secondly, why are you looking at plastic totes for your gear instead of time-tested canoe packs?

And third, how much fishing gear were you planning to bring? I think that most anglers on this board will admit that they bring, or used to bring, too much fishing tackle. It's easy to overthink the need for fishing lures, etc. I used to bring WAY too much fishing tackle until I finally realized that solid pre-trip planning helped me keep the bulk and weight of that stuff to a minimum. Obviously, you have to carry it all and have room for all your other gear, too. "

Thanks, long time lurker, but finally made an account.

1. I've been to BWCA twice, but do more car and Voyagers boat-in camping as I have younger kids. Been all over WI am MN. Also have lot of general on the water experience fishing in the Brainerd area.

2. The totes are handier for storage, organization, waterproofness, and access. They are not as tough as barrels, and they don't carry as nice as packs, but we kind of already operate with a tote system and I like to be different. Seems like a shorter leap to adapt my current tested system than switch to a new one. Fully acknowledge packs and barrels have their time tested place. I also like to make my own gear and developing a tote pack seems straightforward.

3. Too much is probably the shortest answer with a family of six. I like to eat fresh fish if I can. Rods, reels, fish finder, rod holders for trolling, anchor net, and the tackle to support. The bins will be a limiter for me because it's WAY too easy to bring WAY too much.
 
ockycamper
distinguished member(1471)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
06/21/2024 01:04PM  
Our teams have been canoeing for decades, and this is our 16th year in the BWCA. We operate with this guideline: Bring packs and gear with the idea that you KNOW they will go in the water.

I am not a fan of "canoe specific" packs. They are typically fabric, have buckles and in my view offer nothing other then "tradition".

We use NRS, Sealine or similar drybag style packs. I have had a set of Sealline packs for over 20 years and have used them in canoes all over the country with no tears, rips or issues. And water has never breached the inside even in capsizes.
 
Bkorwi
member (7)member
  
06/21/2024 02:30PM  
ockycamper: "Our teams have been canoeing for decades, and this is our 16th year in the BWCA. We operate with this guideline: Bring packs and gear with the idea that you KNOW they will go in the water.


I am not a fan of "canoe specific" packs. They are typically fabric, have buckles and in my view offer nothing other then "tradition".


We use NRS, Sealine or similar drybag style packs. I have had a set of Sealline packs for over 20 years and have used them in canoes all over the country with no tears, rips or issues. And water has never breached the inside even in capsizes."


I had canoe packs on trip one and dry bags on trip 2. I preferred the dry bags. Just for keeping stuff dry from the little water always in the boat. I also like whitewater, and even have a couple barrels and pelicans for that application. But a pelican 1615 seems too big/heavy for canoe travel.

Even so mostly use the costco black and yellow totes for camping for the shear ease of use and stackability.

I think these menards totes will be great with a pack solution. Durability, cost and weight will be close the the costco totes, but with a $5 IP68 vent from digikey they should be as waterproof as a pelican without ballooning or crushing with temp swings.


 
06/21/2024 05:16PM  
I keep my tackle (in 2x 3600 trays) in a backpack that isn't waterproof. Sure the backpack soaks up a bit of water, but most tackle trays are relatively water sealed. It always gets a chance to dry so I have basically no issues with rusting. I even keep my terminal (pliers, tape, scale, snaps, etc) in a pouch that is attached to the outside of the backpack, and also gets wet, and I don't have any issue with corrosion or rust. If I know stuff got soaked from rain or whatever, I'll empty it out at camp and give it a chance to dry, but it's rare.

I only use an actual dry bag (Chattooga duffel, from Watershed) for camera gear, because that _definitely_ shouldn't get wet. Most fishing stuff is designed to be in or near water, though, so going out of my way to keep it dry just needlessly complicates things. That's my take.
 
Bkorwi
member (7)member
  
06/21/2024 05:49PM  
JD: "I keep my tackle (in 2x 3600 trays) in a backpack that isn't waterproof. Sure the backpack soaks up a bit of water, but most tackle trays are relatively water sealed. It always gets a chance to dry so I have basically no issues with rusting. I even keep my terminal (pliers, tape, scale, snaps, etc) in a pouch that is attached to the outside of the backpack, and also gets wet, and I don't have any issue with corrosion or rust. If I know stuff got soaked from rain or whatever, I'll empty it out at camp and give it a chance to dry, but it's rare.


I only use an actual dry bag (Chattooga duffel, from Watershed) for camera gear, because that _definitely_ shouldn't get wet. Most fishing stuff is designed to be in or near water, though, so going out of my way to keep it dry just needlessly complicates things. That's my take."


I'm not so worried about it getting wet, I like that if I were to swim, my fishing stuff would float.
 
06/21/2024 05:53PM  
While I can’t imagine ever bringing one on a summer trip my self, in a way a plastic tote feels like an upgraded 21st century version of the traditional Canadian wannagin. Don’t suspect it would work for me, but if it works for you have at it. I’ve seen worse ways of packing and portaging gear, like suit cases and plastic bags.
 
06/21/2024 07:56PM  
I like that you are thinking outside the box. And that you recognize some high priced well-advertised popular brands are not always better than what you can find at box stores. Most of my early gear came from Salvation Army and military surplus outlets.
I currently put nearly everything in size appropriate compressible waterproof bags. As a solo tripper packs just make more sense.
Please post the tote pack you develop.
 
Bkorwi
member (7)member
  
06/24/2024 05:59AM  
Jaywalker: "While I can’t imagine ever bringing one on a summer trip my self, in a way a plastic tote feels like an upgraded 21st century version of the traditional Canadian wannagin. Don’t suspect it would work for me, but if it works for you have at it. I’ve seen worse ways of packing and portaging gear, like suit cases and plastic bags. "


Great comment, I had never heard of a Wannigan before. It seem there is nothing new under the sun.

Below link is food for thought.

Wannagan Harness

 
Bkorwi
member (7)member
  
06/24/2024 06:03AM  
bhouse46: "I like that you are thinking outside the box. And that you recognize some high priced well-advertised popular brands are not always better than what you can find at box stores. Most of my early gear came from Salvation Army and military surplus outlets.
I currently put nearly everything in size appropriate compressible waterproof bags. As a solo tripper packs just make more sense.
Please post the tote pack you develop."


If I was solo, it'd be packs for sure, but w/4 kids the totes are the way to go for us.

Barrels and dry packs are probably second to these totes if I can't make them work, but are just harder to pack, double check I packed that one thing, and then later access that one thing you need on the bottom.

Pelicans third, just too heavy if your not blasting through whitewater.
 
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