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wingnut
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02/25/2014 02:47PM  
I haven't read any posts about anyone dehydrating their own potatoes. Don't they turn out very well or is it just not worth the bother. I have been thinking about cutting some potatoes into fries then dehydrating but thought I would ask first to see if anyone has already done this to see how they turned out.
 
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02/25/2014 04:29PM  
I buy the cans of diced potatoes and just throw them in the dehydrator (remove them from the can first of course). You wouldn't want to dehydrate them raw and when they're canned they're already cooked. Takes a lot of the work out of it and it's still relatively cheap.
 
wingnut
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02/25/2014 05:44PM  
Why can't you dehydrate them raw.
 
02/25/2014 06:39PM  
I have a salad shooter that I run potatoes through that slices them up very uniformly, then I blanch them and then dehydrate them. I usually do enough for at least one meal per trip for fried potatoes with a fish meal.

If I do any other potatoes, it's the Hungrey Jack Hashbrowns, or one of the Idahoan flavored mashed potatoes.
 
02/25/2014 06:40PM  
I suppose you could dehydrate them raw but they will take longer to rehydrate and may not turn out quite right when cooked. Especially if you plan to fry them. Generally you dont want to fry raw potatoes they dont turn out as nice.
 
wingnut
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02/25/2014 07:07PM  
Fish and fried potatoes, sounds like a winner on a camping trip. I suppose after they are dehydrated they are like potato chips. Do you rehydrate them by letting them soak in hot water for 15 min then fry. I haven't found the hungry Jack hash browns yet but I did pick up the Idahoan mashed potatoes to give a try. I don't have a salad shooter but I can see where that would do a good job of slicing. The canned potatoes look like a good option as well. Especially when they are already cooked.
 
Swampturtle
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02/25/2014 07:13PM  
You can also dehydrate frozen vegetables..spread the frozen veggies right on your trays. This includes cubed hash brown potatoes or potatoes o'brien. O'Brien

I also use the dehydrated hash browns in the box, just add water & fry. After all is said & done it just ends up being less time consuming than doing it myself...Unless I am making a whole dish such as egg bake, that I make from scratch.
 
Savage Voyageur
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02/25/2014 07:14PM  
I tried to do this a few years ago and they did turn out ok but were a lot of work. Peel the potatoes and sent them through my food processor with the hash brown size cutter on. Then you have to hurry and put them in boiling water to prevent them from turning brown. Then in the dehydrator. I can but the box hash browns for much less than I can make them. Bottom line buy them in the box and add hot water to hydrate them before frying them.
 
wingnut
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02/25/2014 07:17PM  
Might sound like a dumb question, but then I've never done this before. You would have to thaw them out first right. Are the cubed Hash browns pre cooked?
 
Swampturtle
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02/25/2014 07:23PM  
quote wingnut: "Might sound like a dumb question, but then I've never done this before. You would have to thaw them out first right. Are the cubed Hash browns pre cooked?"


You do not have to precook them, but you will be cooking them in camp and they are not seasoned. If you want them cooked & seasoned, then do so & dehydrate them. I always try out my recipes before I take them on the road-no matter what anyone else says, you might want to experiment with it yourself.
 
02/25/2014 07:24PM  
quote wingnut: "Fish and fried potatoes, sounds like a winner on a camping trip. I suppose after they are dehydrated they are like potato chips. Do you rehydrate them by letting them soak in hot water for 15 min then fry. I haven't found the hungry Jack hash browns yet but I did pick up the Idahoan mashed potatoes to give a try. I don't have a salad shooter but I can see where that would do a good job of slicing. "


They look just like boxed scalloped or au gratin potatoes. You could probably buy one of these box mixes and just take the spuds.

I pour hot water over them and let sit 10 - 15 minutes and then fry. With this meal I usually have some dehydrated baked beans as well.
 
wingnut
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02/26/2014 07:47AM  
It looks like It's not worth the extra trouble to dehydrate fresh potatoes myself when there are other good options out there although it can be done. The frozen potatoes would still need to be thawed then dehydrated right? I've been experimenting with some recipies I've found here before I hit the water and with mostly good results. I surprised my son with Peta bread pizza cooked on the stove top with all non refrigerated Ingrediants ( except the Motzerella which I still need to work out ) and he was Impressed.
 
billconner
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02/26/2014 10:12AM  
There are cheese sticks that don't need refrigeration. Worst case use fresh mozzarella and don't worry about the separation of oils.

I use the Jiffy pizza dough mix - either fry pan or jmo - and it makes a passable pizza. Thinking about trying no-knead dough for it - but would have to carry dough for a day or only use on layover since it needs an overnight.

Back to OP, I'm not sure that I can do better than the mixes in stores and especially the hash browns in a carton along with instant mashed. All too easy. On the other hand, dehydrating sweet potatoes is an interesting idea. I might try that right after cole slaw mix - which intrigues me.
 
02/26/2014 10:28AM  
quote billconner: "There are cheese sticks that don't need refrigeration. Worst case use fresh mozzarella and don't worry about the separation of oils.


I use the Jiffy pizza dough mix - either fry pan or jmo - and it makes a passable pizza. Thinking about trying no-knead dough for it - but would have to carry dough for a day or only use on layover since it needs an overnight.


Back to OP, I'm not sure that I can do better than the mixes in stores and especially the hash browns in a carton along with instant mashed. All too easy. On the other hand, dehydrating sweet potatoes is an interesting idea. I might try that right after cole slaw mix - which intrigues me."


Dehydrating sweet potatoes works but they turn out somewhat tacky unless you leave them in for a very long time. One of my favorite dehydrated foods is sweet potato leathers (similar to fruit leathers). I've also left them in the dehydrator for a very long time to get them as crispy as possible and then throw the remains into a food processor to make a kind of sweet potato "granules" which rehydrates well into mashed sweet potatoes.
 
Swampturtle
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02/26/2014 12:22PM  
quote wingnut: " It looks like It's not worth the extra trouble to dehydrate fresh potatoes myself when there are other good options out there although it can be done. The frozen potatoes would still need to be thawed then dehydrated right? I've been experimenting with some recipies I've found here before I hit the water and with mostly good results. I surprised my son with Peta bread pizza cooked on the stove top with all non refrigerated Ingrediants ( except the Motzerella which I still need to work out ) and he was Impressed."


You hit the nail on the head...it's time & energy consuming to dehydrate potatoes when you can find them in your grocery aisle.

You can put frozen veggies right into your dehydrator and dehydrate them. No need to thaw them. I do green beans, peas, corn etc, right from the bag onto the trays. Works great.

I use mozzarella or other string cheese which are sealed individually, but they still need to be kept cool. I also tend to bring along more smoked or wax wrapped cheeses, because they travel better than softer cheeses. Smoked cheese is a bit harder and has less moisture than the regular versions. We carry smoked Swiss, Gouda & yes-even mozzarella on trips.
 
Swampturtle
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02/26/2014 12:39PM  
"
Dehydrating sweet potatoes works but they turn out somewhat tacky unless you leave them in for a very long time. One of my favorite dehydrated foods is sweet potato leathers (similar to fruit leathers). I've also left them in the dehydrator for a very long time to get them as crispy as possible and then throw the remains into a food processor to make a kind of sweet potato "granules" which rehydrates well into mashed sweet potatoes."


Whoa...sweet potato leather...that sounds good...thanks for the tips on the sweet potatoes. Cache Lake Foods makes a "pumpkin" pie with sweet potatoes that we went nuts over. I think mashed sweet potato might go on our next trip. Unless someone has found instant mashed sweet potatoes out there on the grocery shelves...it has to be a matter of time...
 
inspector13
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02/26/2014 01:15PM  
quote Swampturtle: "I think mashed sweet potato might go on our next trip. Unless someone has found instant mashed sweet potatoes out there on the grocery shelves...it has to be a matter of time..."

This is out there on the shelves, maybe for two years in the Twin Cities market. Betty Crocker makes them. They are mixed with regular potato flakes however, giving them the texture of boxed mashed potatoes with a sweet potato taste.

 
Swampturtle
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02/26/2014 01:22PM  
This is out there on the shelves, maybe for two years in the Twin Cities market. Betty Crocker makes them. They are mixed with regular potato flakes however, giving them the texture of boxed mashed potatoes with a sweet potato taste."


Thanks for this, I just did a search and Knorr has a version as well that is water only, but finding locally might prove difficult for me. The BC version has very mixed reviews on their website, makes sense now that you tell me how they are made. Looks like I'm going to have to make them fresh...or just bring a darn sweet potato and put it over the fire...oh, right ...there is always that! Sorry if I ventured off topic....
 
wingnut
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02/26/2014 02:25PM  
I did venture off point when I mentioned the mozzarella, but It is still unclear to me. I've read several threads about bringing cheese most say you can bring the shredded sealed bags but the oil separates and gets a little gooey? The hard cheese is a better option but How do I know I've found hard cheese or the cheese sticks when I see them? Is it unrefrigerated on a shelf in block form or in the sticks case round and sealed in plastic.
 
billconner
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02/26/2014 03:04PM  
Cache Lake has some instant sweet potato options in addition to the sweet potato pie. I've tried the cheesy sweet potatoes - tasty and nice for variety. Cache Lake Sweet Potato dishes
 
inspector13
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02/26/2014 04:00PM  
quote wingnut: "The hard cheese is a better option but How do I know I've found hard cheese or the cheese sticks when I see them? Is it unrefrigerated on a shelf in block form or in the sticks case round and sealed in plastic."

The difference between hard and soft cheeses is much like it sounds, and it is the result of its moisture content. For example a slice of hard cheese will break easily and quicker when bent while a soft cheese will bend easily. The spectrum will run from the classic hard cheeses like parmesan and Romano (Not the spaghetti topping that comes in a can, but the blocks of cheese you can grate.) to soft spreadable cheeses like Brie. All cheese can go without refrigeration for a time, but hard cheeses hold up better than softer ones. Mozzarella is a semi soft cheese. Cheddar is a semi hard cheese. So cheddar holds up better than mozzarella while camping.

The way it is packaged can help a little if it is a softer cheese. Like the individually wrapped Babybel, or individually wrapped processed cheese like string cheese. The stuff you find unrefrigerated is processed cheese food which can hold up while camping too. Like the so called "parmesan topping" and cheese in a can.

 
goaljohnbill
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02/26/2014 04:30PM  
quote Swampturtle: "potatoes o'brien. O'Brien

...Unless I am making a whole dish such as egg bake, that I make from scratch. "


I use those obriens as part of a mexicany breakfast hash. My one comment on them is they seem to need a longer presoak and more water to rehydrate than pasta and rice. In my 1st taste/rehydrate test after 2ish hours of soaking (enough for everything else ive done) they were still not reformed back to shape although they werent activly crunchy.
 
goaljohnbill
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02/26/2014 04:34PM  
quote Swampturtle: ""
Dehydrating sweet potatoes works but they turn out somewhat tacky unless you leave them in for a very long time. One of my favorite dehydrated foods is sweet potato leathers (similar to fruit leathers). I've also left them in the dehydrator for a very long time to get them as crispy as possible and then throw the remains into a food processor to make a kind of sweet potato "granules" which rehydrates well into mashed sweet potatoes."



Whoa...sweet potato leather...that sounds good...thanks for the tips on the sweet potatoes. Cache Lake Foods makes a "pumpkin" pie with sweet potatoes that we went nuts over. I think mashed sweet potato might go on our next trip. Unless someone has found instant mashed sweet potatoes out there on the grocery shelves...it has to be a matter of time..."


Fruit leathers are super popular at my house so are sweet potatoes I may need to look into this
 
02/26/2014 05:07PM  
quote goaljohnbill: "
quote Swampturtle: ""
Dehydrating sweet potatoes works but they turn out somewhat tacky unless you leave them in for a very long time. One of my favorite dehydrated foods is sweet potato leathers (similar to fruit leathers). I've also left them in the dehydrator for a very long time to get them as crispy as possible and then throw the remains into a food processor to make a kind of sweet potato "granules" which rehydrates well into mashed sweet potatoes."




Whoa...sweet potato leather...that sounds good...thanks for the tips on the sweet potatoes. Cache Lake Foods makes a "pumpkin" pie with sweet potatoes that we went nuts over. I think mashed sweet potato might go on our next trip. Unless someone has found instant mashed sweet potatoes out there on the grocery shelves...it has to be a matter of time..."



Fruit leathers are super popular at my house so are sweet potatoes I may need to look into this"


The super easy way to do the leathers is to buy the canned sweet potatoes. Drain, puree, and spread them out on a drying sheet. If I'm making the dried "granules" I start from fresh sweet potatoes.
 
Swampturtle
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02/27/2014 09:19AM  
quote wingnut: "I did venture off point when I mentioned the mozzarella, but It is still unclear to me. I've read several threads about bringing cheese most say you can bring the shredded sealed bags but the oil separates and gets a little gooey? The hard cheese is a better option but How do I know I've found hard cheese or the cheese sticks when I see them? Is it unrefrigerated on a shelf in block form or in the sticks case round and sealed in plastic."


Inspector13 is right, it's all about the moisture content. The more moisture, the greater chance of spoilage at high temps. Anything sealed in plastic or wax creates a bit of a barrier to nasties. Cheddar can be aged, whereas the moisture slowly evaporates, creating a harder, denser, sharper cheese. Smoking further reduces the moisture and sometimes creates a rind whereas the outer layer of cheese is drier and denser than the middle. Smoked mozzarella is drier than regular Polly-o mozzarella and fresh made mozzarella is the moistest version-usually found in a brine.

The bottom line is to bring what you like & care for it property & keep it cool. We bring a variety, make sure to use the softest cheese during your first day or two, save the harder cheeses for later. If you bring a wax covered block, it will last the longest, you can shred it yourself. We sometimes bring a wet bag, something I made from a pair of old jeans. You wet it in the lake, place your cheese in a ziplock inside and hang in a cool, shady, breezy spot. As the water evaporates it keeps your items cool. Another idea is to wrap your block cheese in vinegar wrapped cheesecloth-inside a ziplock, vinegar keeps bacteria from growing.

Here is an example of smoked cheeses, these are available locally (for me) in the refrigerated case near the deli section of my grocery store.
Red apple
Here are string cheeses, many varieties & brands to choose from. Mozzarella string cheese pulls apart from one end creating strings.

Hard cheeses


I wish I was near Wisconsin...we discovered Humbird cheese on our way home from the BW last year...so many cheeses & summer sausage...soooooo good!
 
goaljohnbill
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02/27/2014 10:14AM  
quote keth0601: "
The super easy way to do the leathers is to buy the canned sweet potatoes. Drain, puree, and spread them out on a drying sheet. If I'm making the dried "granules" I start from fresh sweet potatoes."


We did our own baby food because of some allergies (and cost) so i have lots of practice making veggie purees. Lots of oven roasting whole veggies, cooling and food processing. I wish I would have thought of trying canned. Though the wife may have argued about it because of the possibility of BPA
 
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