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Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Group Forum: Solo Tripping
      Storing Cooked Food     

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TheBrownLeader
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12/30/2014 10:04AM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
I could ask this on the food forum, but I'm here so here goes... does anyone keep food you've cooked overnight when on a trip? For instance, in my Christmas Stocking I got a Chicken and Rice dehydrated meal that feeds 4.. I am one, so I'd eat half at night and want to ziplock up the second half and eat it in the morning...

I can do that, right? I mean, the food will be ok to eat 10-12 hours later without getting me sick, won't it?

Thanks in advance, TBL..
 
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12/30/2014 10:18AM  
I regularly split family packages into solo meals. Reseal in a vac sealer. I do this with both dried and freeze dried. Never liked the idea of storing leftovers in camp or around camp.

butthead

 
TheBrownLeader
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12/30/2014 10:25AM  
Thanks Butthead... I'm not sure I like the idea either, but oftentimes I hear from others who do the things I am reticent to do, and I realize there are more ways to do things... Like the old hang versus hide discussion. I hang, and I'm not changing. But, I might hold on to some extra food for breakfast if it works for others.
 
PortageKeeper
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12/30/2014 10:26AM  
quote butthead: "I regularly split family packages into solo meals. Reseal in a vac sealer. I do this with both dried and freeze dried. Never liked the idea of storing leftovers in camp or around camp.


butthead


"

X2 ... always portion before the trip and never keep leftovers.
 
12/30/2014 10:49AM  
X3. What is the advantage of inviting critters and possible stomach poisoning while on a trip, especially solo. It might store fine, especially when the temps are cooler, but it is so easy to just pack what I will actually eat and I am still working on reducing the amount I put in each pack.
 
billconner
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12/30/2014 10:55AM  
I have kept a cooked lunch item and reheated at dinner, but that is rare. I recall one cold and storming rainy day we stopped early and I made a pot of Bear Creek Minestrone for lunch and reheated for dinner because it was there and tasted good.

In terms of dividing, there are tips here - like sifting through a strainer and dividing the powder ingredients separately form the larger pieces - like the pasta sides. Worked well.
 
TheBrownLeader
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12/30/2014 10:56AM  
Thank you this is good feedback. I think I am a X4 now, and I was looking to confirm it. I appreciate your thoughts.
 
MacCamper
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12/30/2014 11:14AM  
5X. Leftovers are a real hassle in the BWCA in MHO. If you portion properly there shouldn't be much but the pan to lick clean. If you haven't tried them, the Bear Creek soups are easy to split and better to eat, especially with a little "home made" treatment.

Mac
 
Alan Gage
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12/30/2014 11:19AM  
I've done it before and I'm sure I'll do it again. Cook too much for supper and throw what's left in a zip-lock to be eaten either for breakfast or lunch the next day. Never been a problem but that doesn't mean it couldn't be.

I don't intend to go that route but when you cook too much it's either save it or throw it out. I prefer to save it.

I normally trip in the spring and fall with lows in the 30's/40's and highs in the 60's/70's. I might look at it differently in August.

Alan
 
12/30/2014 11:23AM  
One more benefit of re-portioning large meal packs before the trip is adding a few extra ingredients I like, dried green onions or extra dried mushrooms for examples.

butthead
 
12/30/2014 02:31PM  
That's an advantage of traveling with someone. You can slip it in their tent. Seriously, my biggest job in the off season is figuring out portions.
 
Alan Gage
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12/30/2014 03:12PM  
I should probably do more portions than I do. Most of my food is carried in its original state in bulk so I can mix and match whatever I want. Quinoa, rice, beans, farro, pasta, and dried vegetables. It's easy to add a little of this and a little of that and end up with a whole lot!

Alan
 
lindylair
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01/01/2015 06:35PM  
Technical food safety info:

Once food reaches a temperature over 40 degrees (and less than cooked temperature obviously) for a period of four hours bacteria begins to grow in it which could potentially make you sick - very sick. Doesn't always happen but the last place I would want to contract a food borne illness would be 3 days into the BWCA or Q. If you are tripping in shoulder seasons where overnight temps get into the 30s you would probably be fine. Otherwise it is risky.
 
MacCamper
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01/02/2015 01:05PM  
A few years back on a trip to Malberg with my daughter, I contracted food poisoning the night prior to packing out. It was either the unrefrigerated cheese or chicken that was suspect. I had both, she had neither. She was smart, I was dumb. It was a terrible experience to pack out with something going on in my system. I was close to useless, something she points out to this day. We can laugh about it now, but I had furious daughter who basically carried my sick body out of the BWCA. Risky food, no matter how delicious it may look, isn't worth the potential impact upon an adventure.
 
Alan Gage
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01/02/2015 02:13PM  
I've always assume, perhaps incorrectly, that if I got the leftover food plenty hot I would be killing most, if not all, of the beasties that could do me harm.

Alan
 
OldFingers57
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01/03/2015 07:43AM  
Split the meal before you go on the trip and vac seal it. After it's cooked you do not want to be saving food as you will be risking food poisoning.
 
yellowcanoe
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01/03/2015 08:44AM  
quote Alan Gage: "I've always assume, perhaps incorrectly, that if I got the leftover food plenty hot I would be killing most, if not all, of the beasties that could do me harm.


Alan"


Alan I did a quick google search and found that the toxins produced by spoiled food are not heat sensitive. this just covers cheese
 
TrekScouter
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01/14/2015 08:26AM  
quote billconner: "--snip--In terms of dividing, there are tips here - like sifting through a strainer and dividing the powder ingredients separately form the larger pieces - like the pasta sides. Worked well. "
Nice tip!
 
paddlinjoe
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01/14/2015 09:06AM  
quote billconner: "I have kept a cooked lunch item and reheated at dinner, but that is rare. I recall one cold and storming rainy day we stopped early and I made a pot of Bear Creek Minestrone for lunch and reheated for dinner because it was there and tasted good.


In terms of dividing, there are tips here - like sifting through a strainer and dividing the powder ingredients separately form the larger pieces - like the pasta sides. Worked well. "


Thank you for the sifting idea! I was going to ask how you split meals where there is powder amongst larger items.
 
gkimball
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01/14/2015 09:16AM  
I never want leftovers. They violate the principle of keeping a clean camp. Freeze dried and dehydrated foods are easiest to manage for keeping a clean camp. For suppers soloing I divide a Mountain House dinner for two in half and put the portions in separate plastic bags. One half seems to be a good sized dinner, since I seem to eat less when soling anyway. Can always fill in with gorp after dinner if I want. Breakfast and lunch are simpler meals and never create leftovers.
 
01/14/2015 04:53PM  
When I did my solo last Sept. I also split a 2 person meal in half into 2 freezer bags. I just eyeballed the amount of chunks vs powder in the 2 bags and it worked well.
 
OldFingers57
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01/14/2015 05:46PM  
The only way I save leftover food is if I have some type of cooler and ice with me.
 
wetcanoedog
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01/15/2015 06:57PM  
many years ago i started test cooking camping meals at home.
i have a file box of notes and among them are the results.
3/4 cup of pancake mix is just right for one guy,half a cup of minute rice for the egg and rice scrambled egg breakfast and two tubes of peanut butter is just right if cheese is used for a few lunches.
test cooking is a good way to fill in the time during the winter and brings the canoe season a bit closer.
everything go's into zip locks stored inside larger zips to cut down the smell of food.
before the no burn rule i did scrap left overs in the evening bonfire.
 
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