BWCA Questions............ Boundary Waters Group Forum: BeaV's Trip to Alaska
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DrBobDg
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01/10/2015 09:23PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
How did you go about deciding which watercraft to use?
How did you keep your feet from falling apart? Foot Care?
Socks?
thanks

dr bob
 
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DrBobDg
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01/11/2015 07:31AM  
That Canoe of yours looked familiar....then I checked my book shelf.


All Things are Possible The Verlen Kruger Story: 100,000 miles by Paddle


That guy was crazy as well. In 2002 he did the Yukon River. Your canoe was one of his designs. Among the crazy things about that guy is he did not know how to swim... I think cancer finally got him but he almost drowned twice I believe...

He made some big mistakes but finished his life well....


drbob
 
01/11/2015 08:05AM  
quote DrBobDg: "How did you go about deciding which watercraft to use?
How did you keep your feet from falling apart? Foot Care?
Socks?"

I think you already answered your first question by knowing what Verlen Kruger did and the canoe designs and redesigns he created. One of my first decisions I had to make after deciding to do my Adventure was what canoe? I posted on this site looking for opinions on what is the most seaworthy canoe out there. The reply back was the Kruger Sea Wind. I then made arrangements to paddle one on Lake Superior and was quickly convinced that this was the right boat for my trip. This boat is built to withstand punishment, paddles fast, laughs at the wind, carries a big load, and is comfortable enough to sit in all day. "Expedition class" for sure.

Foot care? No problems with feet other than a few blisters when doing the portages. Socks were merino wool- 2 pairs. Alternate and clean in cold water every couple of weeks. Chlorine tablets were useful for occasional cleanings. Usually dry socks by wearing them to bed at night. Biggest problem comes with the extended days of non use of my lower body when paddling for so long. Probably a medical term for what happens when you don't use part of your body? Skin becomes too soft, muscles weakened, and joints not able to take abuse. It makes it really punishing on the body to then have to exert yourself on a portage.
 
01/11/2015 08:40AM  
I was going to ask about the atrophy of your lower body coming into Skagway. Did you work out during the extended time off here? Maybe the extra week was good to rebuild your legs for that climb.

During the trip did you ever wonder if you actually WERE crazy to be doing this sort of thing? The mental aspect of this trip surely was almost as hard as the physical. I know what it's like to paddle and portage alone for an 8 - 9 hour day in Quetico but to be on the Yukon for 10 hours a day of nothing but paddling day after day.... Wow. You have what NASA called in the 1960's "The Right Stuff".

Also, how did your butt do? It looks like you had a real good pad to sit on.

 
01/11/2015 09:26AM  
quote TomT: "I was going to ask about the atrophy of your lower body coming into Skagway. Did you work out during the extended time off here? Maybe the extra week was good to rebuild your legs for that climb.

During the trip did you ever wonder if you actually WERE crazy to be doing this sort of thing? The mental aspect of this trip surely was almost as hard as the physical.

Also, how did your butt do? It looks like you had a real good pad to sit on. "

Atrophy, yes that's what it is. Coming into Skagway I had only one day(windbound at the BeaV cave) that I went for a short walk into the rain forest out of 42 days mostly sitting in the canoe. So yes, when I was delayed due to the late winter, I walked around town a bunch and then started hiking the nearby mountain trails eventually with a pack or the canoe. I overdid it one day just before starting the Chilkoot Portage and ended up with blisters-errr! The worst atrophy, though, was later. Had no leg workout starting July 5th at the Koyukuk River until I portaged over Cape Newenham (about mid August). After that difficult portage I could hardly walk for the next couple days. This was always a concern of mine, thereafter, with the Williamsport Road portage looming ahead in the future with more atrophy to come.

Crazy? Nope that was never a real thought, although I did jokingly say that "I must be crazy" sometimes. But I never believed that. I always was aware of the potential dangers ahead and I always looked back at things that didn't go as planned and tried to think what I could do better the next time. I did feel really beat down/wore out on the upper Koyukuk River stretch and questioned should I continue out into the Bering Sea. I knew from all the warnings from Alaskans that venturing out there could be the end. I think that is why I recorded that long trip summary speech near the end of Part 11- I thought I better summarize "the trip to date" now just in case that would be the last chance for family to see me(my farewell speech I suppose). Reviewing that farewell speech, at 19:45 "I still have concerns about how I'm going to do the Bering Sea" is BeaV code for acknowledging that "I may not survive the Bering Sea" and at 26:00 "later" means "I'm good with whatever happens, though I expect to see you again".

Seat Pads? Yes I used a pad. I never usually do but I thought for this amount of seat time, it couldn't hurt. I never had any "butt" issues. Is it fun to sit that long? Does it get any better after months of sitting that long? No and no.
 
DrBobDg
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01/12/2015 09:10PM  
ANswer is probably somewhere else but how much did this trip cost you $$$-wise.....other than blood sweat and tears.
How much did you stash to bring on the trip to resupply etc.??

thanks
drbob
 
01/13/2015 05:01PM  
quote DrBobDg: "ANswer is probably somewhere else but how much did this trip cost you $$$-wise.....other than blood sweat and tears.
How much did you stash to bring on the trip to resupply etc.??drbob"

Trip Cost: I never kept track of costs. Ball park is probably $15,000 not including food or travel to and from. Of course, I lost my work income for 7 months, too.

Traveling Cash: $3000, not sure if I even used half of this. Only substantial expenses when out there was occasional food purchases and mailing costs. Food at remote villages is expensive probably 3 times as lower 48. I remember I bought a 1-gallon can of Coleman white gas in Allakeket on the Koyukuk River for $50.

 
KarlBAndersen1
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01/19/2015 09:39PM  
OK - goofy question - I think.
If your total cost didn't include food and travel, to and from, where did you spend $15K?
And if you prefer not to answer that, pardon my intrusion.

Then, I guess when we consider the cost of some items being so exorbitant, and for how long you were enroute, I reckon it could add up quickly.

 
01/20/2015 07:53AM  
I'm always concerned about losing my valuable personal stuff like credit cards, driver liscense, cash, keys, etc. when on a week long canoe trip. Beav, how did you carry this stuff? Was it on your person at all times?

Also, did you carry spare glasses? At points you had your glasses resting on top of your hat without a lanyard. That's something I never do. Those oakleys are real good quality as I own a pair. I would hate to be on the water on a bright day without them.

 
01/20/2015 09:53AM  
quote KarlBAndersen1: "If your total cost didn't include food and travel, to and from, where did you spend $15K?
And if you prefer not to answer that, pardon my intrusion. "
Not a goofy ? and I'll answer it.

I just went through my gear spreadsheet and roughly added up the equipment and supplies purchased prior to starting the trip and it's closer to $20,000. I'm not going to show my "gear list" but some of the bigger items were canoe $6000, paddles $1000, drysuit $1100, and lots of $200-500 items. Some of the stuff didn't make the cut for the trip or was spare items for just in case.
 
01/20/2015 10:13AM  
quote TomT: "I'm always concerned about losing my valuable personal stuff like credit cards, driver liscense, cash, keys, etc. when on a week long canoe trip. Beav, how did you carry this stuff? Was it on your person at all times?

Also, did you carry spare glasses? At points you had your glasses resting on top of your hat without a lanyard. That's something I never do. Those oakleys are real good quality as I own a pair. I would hate to be on the water on a bright day without them."

Personal stuff was in my Duluth Pack fanny pack that could be called a day pack or ditch kit or, when in a town, maybe my purse. Everything I needed for the day was in here and it was nearly always with me.

Had 2 pair of sunglasses but never with me at the same time. Used the black ones paddling To and Around Alaska and the Oakleys when paddling Through Alaska. Both pair stayed nicely atop my lid without fear of losing'em or breaking them. Seamed like the safest place to store them without the fear of losing them or crushing them in a pack. Plus I always knew where they were and they were handy.
 
KarlBAndersen1
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01/20/2015 03:35PM  
quote BeaV: "quote KarlBAndersen1: "If your total cost didn't include food and travel, to and from, where did you spend $15K?
And if you prefer not to answer that, pardon my intrusion. "
Not a goofy ? and I'll answer it.



Thank you. That makes sense.
Funny how it all adds up.
 
BWPaddler
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01/21/2015 09:45AM  
If this has been asked and answered somewhere, please point me to it...


What was the approach for filming yourself? Ex: while hiking Chilkoot, did you set up camera on first pass and then operate it remotely when passing by on another trip with gear? How much extra time do you think it cost you to capture the trip on video?
 
01/21/2015 04:01PM  
quote BWPaddler: "If this has been asked and answered somewhere, please point me to it...



What was the approach for filming yourself? Ex: while hiking Chilkoot, did you set up camera on first pass and then operate it remotely when passing by on another trip with gear? How much extra time do you think it cost you to capture the trip on video?"


My feeling is that it was just on a tripod ahead of time. Sometimes you'll see panning and zooming but that was probably done in post production.

My question is who put this movie together with the map animations and the overeads and historic pics? Also the soundtrack and text overlays. The one where BeaV makes a "C" with his hand then you see the word "handalar" is way cool. Is this a BeaV production start to finish?

 
01/21/2015 05:12PM  
quote BWPaddler: "What was the approach for filming yourself? Ex: while hiking Chilkoot, did you set up camera on first pass and then operate it remotely when passing by on another trip with gear? How much extra time do you think it cost you to capture the trip on video?"
I didn't do very much stationary filming, that is leave the camera behind while I moved. It was just too time consuming and a waste of energy to have to go back for the camera. Also, I had no way to remotely control the camera so it was very wasteful on battery power and memory cards to turn the camera on, film the action, and then return to the camera.

Time spent on above type video was only a few hours. Total video footage taken was probably 60-80 hours and maybe 2000 still photo's. Most of this was done while on the move or when done for the day in camp and so I don't consider it time away from the Adventure.
 
01/21/2015 05:25PM  
quote TomT: "My question is who put this movie together with the map animations and the overeads and historic pics? Also the soundtrack and text overlays. The one where BeaV makes a "C" with his hand then you see the word "handalar" is way cool. Is this a BeaV production start to finish? "
Yes it is strictly a BeaV first-timer production. OneMatch (Jerry Vandiver) did grant me permission to incorporate his music and provided me with a couple cool instrumental versions.
 
01/21/2015 07:05PM  
It's very impressive if it's your first time. What program did you use to edit?

 
01/21/2015 07:10PM  
quote TomT: "It's very impressive if it's your first time. What program did you use to edit?"
Sony Movie Studio Platinum 13
The program seems to be good, but their help is almost worthless. I figured it out, though. Solo again.
 
Bonvicken
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01/24/2015 10:38AM  
Sad that you lost your hat but glad you stayed alive! That was a way cool hat and I'm sure there's a story associated with it...please share. Also, where'd you pick up the 3rd hat?
 
Bonvicken
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01/24/2015 10:47AM  
Beav, I used to run marathons and what you put your body through on the Chilkoot and the bush portage required orders of magnitude more endurance than what is required from a marathon runner, as you were exerting yourself for days rather than hours. Interested in the physical and mental aspects of that...what was your pre-trip physical training regimen? How did you stay fully hydrated/fueled? Obviously you did NOT stay fully fueled during the bush portage and had gone past depleting fat reserves and started burning muscle..a double whammy! How did you keep it together mentally during these incredibly physically demanding parts of the trip? Did you ever consider just giving up?
 
01/24/2015 04:27PM  
Yeah, the endurance aspect is pretty incredible. I'm wondering how your joints came through this? Any tendonitis? What supplements did you take during the trip? It's conceivable that you would have a mineral or vitamin deficiency after being on the trail that long.

 
OneMatch
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01/24/2015 09:53PM  
quote Bonvicken: " Did you ever consider just giving up?"

I've wondered this too, but how do you give up in the middle of the tundra? Seems like most of the time you don't have that choice. Pretty amazing.
 
01/24/2015 11:41PM  
quote OneMatch: "quote Bonvicken: " Did you ever consider just giving up?"
I've wondered this too, but how do you give up in the middle of the tundra? Seems like most of the time you don't have that choice. Pretty amazing. "

I highly doubt I would be able to even WANT to try that tundra portage solo. So many things could have gone wrong. That ground is so unstable, then the navigation part.... Not to mention the lack of drinkable water and physical exertion required.

I'm convinced that BeaV is really an alien with superpowers. No other way to explain it.

 
DrBobDg
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01/25/2015 07:50AM  
gotta talk him into writing a book, doing a series on BWJ, and talking at 'copia.
drbob
 
01/25/2015 08:41AM  
quote DrBobDg: "gotta talk him into writing a book, doing a series on BWJ, and talking at 'copia.
drbob"


I like to think big. PBS mini series. Then at the end a live in studio question and answer segment with BeaV himself. (If he hasn't gone back to his home planet by then:)

 
01/25/2015 01:09PM  
quote Bonvicken: "Sad that you lost your hat but glad you stayed alive! That was a way cool hat and I'm sure there's a story associated with it...please share. Also, where'd you pick up the 3rd hat?"
My leather lid I bought at a gathering of trappers in the early 1990's. It was a shame to lose it as it was just getting broken in. It was on my head on top of majestic rocky mountain peaks, in cold duck blinds, in crisp October grouse woods, in fast flowing trout streams, and countless downhill ski runs. It obviously liked Alaska too, as it chose to stay there. :)

That 3rd hat you saw me wearing the day I made it to Anchorage was given to me a couple weeks earlier by one of the owners of Alaska Rainbow Lodge on the Kvichak River. I stopped there to pick up a food drop they stored for me.
 
01/25/2015 01:41PM  
quote Bonvicken: "Beav, I used to run marathons and what you put your body through on the Chilkoot and the bush portage required orders of magnitude more endurance than what is required from a marathon runner, as you were exerting yourself for days rather than hours. Interested in the physical and mental aspects of that...what was your pre-trip physical training regimen? Did you ever consider just giving up?"
Obviously, the portages were physically hard while on the move but most people don't understand how physically hard it is to paddle hard and steady for 10-12 hours per day. It surprised me how spent I was every night after a full days paddle. I never expected my lower body to be tired after sitting in the boat all day, but I was "all in" every night after paddling. It took a lot of effort to unload and carry gear up to camp at night. The only thing I can think of to explain it is that my heart was just tuckered out.

Training? I'm not a exercise equipment type guy and I have an office job. I paddled 600 miles the year before the trip and peddled a mountain bike alittle, carried my canoe down the road, and did my normal outdoor activities. The winter before the trip had me stuck in the house making maps/dehydrating food/trip preparations with no exercise. I guess I wasn't in great shape when I started but it didn't take long before I was.

Giving up? No! There was a period of doubt (see above reply to TomT) whether or not I should attempt the Bering Sea. If at some point in time I didn't think I could go on, I would've ended it. Many times I WAS physically done and some times mentally worn out, but there was always something else that pushed me on. Hard to explain it so I won't try.
 
01/25/2015 02:15PM  
quote TomT: "Yeah, the endurance aspect is pretty incredible. I'm wondering how your joints came through this? Any tendonitis? What supplements did you take during the trip?"
Way more pains developed during than after, I'm good.

No supplements. Obviously, fresh fruits and vegies were lacking but I did add tons of dried/crushed kale to most of my suppers. Not sure if much nutrition remains after drying?
 
01/25/2015 02:33PM  
quote TomT: "(If he hasn't gone back to his home planet by then:)"
Good one! I'm gonna stay here cuz I hate those spinning space ships- they make me dizzy:)
 
Bonvicken
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01/25/2015 05:36PM  
Hard to explain it so I won't try."

I get it. Thanks for the response, Beav.
 
CanoeKev
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02/02/2015 10:19AM  
BeaV, can you tell us about your solar panel and the charging equiptment that you used? Would you recommend anything different than what you used?
 
02/02/2015 05:21PM  
quote CanoeKev: "BeaV, can you tell us about your solar panel and the charging equiptment that you used? Would you recommend anything different than what you used?"
Solar Panel/Battery Pack Review

I spent a lot of time researching the various solar panels and battery packs before my trip, purchased and tried various ones, and ended up using the following for my 6-month trip.

Solar Panel- Powerfilm R14
Primary Battery Pack- Goal Zero Sherpa 50
Secondary Battery Pack- Goal Zero Guide 10 Plus
Adaptor Cable- This was needed to be able to connect the Powerfilm panel to the Goal Zero Sherpa.

I lived off of solar power for 6 months in very harsh conditions including salt water and exposure to lots of rain. I needed to be able to charge a GPS, Inreach satellite communicator, 2 headlamp flashlights, and 2 cameras. I needed to be able to charge rechargeable AA and AAA batteries and also lithium batteries that required a USB connection and an AC connection.

I mounted the solar panel permanently on the canoe deck with shock cords. On sunny days while paddling I would plug in the Sherpa 50 to the panel to collect and store the sun's energy. At night, safe from weather and rain in the tent, I would plug in the Guide 10 into the Sherpa for charging AA and AAA batteries, or plug in other batteries/electronics direct into the Sherpa with USB or AC connections.

This system usually provided enough power and worked great for some time. However, the weak points were that exposure to salt water eventually corroded cable connection and both battery packs were not waterproof. The Sherpa 50 quit working after a capsize that submerged the unit. After this, I hardwired the Guide 10 to the panel and used this as my primary power storage. Eventually this also got submerged and quit working. I was able to get around corroded cable connections by hardwiring wires together.

I was very satisfied with these products but wish the battery packs could be waterproof or I could have found a way to make them so. Hard to keep the battery packs dry when charging on the water with exposure from rain, bilge water, and capsize. I wish I had had the time to figure out a waterproof container to place the Sherpa 50 in with a waterproof cable connection. The solar panel was bombproof and still works fine.

 
02/07/2015 05:43PM  
I rewatched from the Chandalar river to the end. Pulling/dragging up the Chandalar - insanely hard. Crossing the Tundra some 15-25 miles with no water enroute promised - insanely hard. The Bering Sea in a canoe - death wish hard.

After all that BeaV says that the hardest water conditions to paddle came on the Kvichak (SP)River on the way up to Lake Iliamna. There's very little footage along the river.

BeaV can you describe the conditions? The river looked pretty fast and you were going against the current. What were the options if you did go over?

 
DrBobDg
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02/07/2015 09:01PM  
One advantage going solo would be that the only one you can argue with is yourself. I imagine two people dealing with those conditions would have a tough time dealing with each other.
drbob
 
02/08/2015 07:47AM  
quote TomT: "I rewatched from the Chandalar river to the end. Pulling/dragging up the Chandalar - insanely hard. Crossing the Tundra some 15-25 miles with no water enroute promised - insanely hard. The Bering Sea in a canoe - death wish hard.

After all that BeaV says that the hardest water conditions to paddle came on the Kvichak (SP)River on the way up to Lake Iliamna. There's very little footage along the river.

BeaV can you describe the conditions? The river looked pretty fast and you were going against the current. What were the options if you did go over?"

"The most dangerous paddling conditions to date" occurred at the mouth of the Kvichak River probably more so the Kvichak Bay. This day was my chance to finally free myself from the grip of the Bering Sea. The plan was to paddle toward Kvichak Bay until the outgoing (ebb) tide was strong, then wait on shore for the next incoming tide. I wanted to time my entry into the Kvichak River with the incoming tide to make this transition easier but mainly safer. Left camp that morning at 7 am Alaska time, paddled until tidal current had my speed cut in half (noon), pulled onto shore at some abandoned houses, and waited. Unfortunately, extensive sand tidal flats showed themselves at this location and prevented me from launching on my hoped for schedule. Waited and waited for 8 hours before the sea allowed me to finally launch at 8 pm. Heck of a time to start paddling into a river entrance past areas like "deadman's shoal" with river current, tide current, mud flats, murky water, and hidden channels. My map showed a village called Nakeen and the GPS showed the main navigable river channel on my side of the bay/river.

As I enter the river's mouth, darkness is coming on. I'm struggling with water too shallow to paddle effectively. I'm thinking "what the heck, I'm supposed to be in the deep water channel?". I keep studying my GPS, compass, and google map. Where's the village lights, I should be seeing lights from Nakeen ahead. Something is not right and the google map shows the deep channel on the opposite side of the river a mile away. Nine pm, in the pitch blackness, I decide my only option is to cross the river. Conditions are OK as I move out into the open flashlight on my head. For some reason at 9:47 pm, I was to find out months later, my tracking device quit recording. The last track reading read "7 mph" as the incoming tidal current started pushing me upriver. At this same time a strong wind coming the opposite direction started blowing. Large waves formed and traveling directly against the tidal current. Conditions such as these have to be seen and experienced to fully understand what happens. I wanted to run for safety on the opposite bank but did not dare place the canoe broadside to this. Only choice was to paddle directly into the waves until a river bend would intersect with my bearing at about 4 miles to go. Wind picked up to about 30 mph and the opposing tidal current picked up to 8 mph.

I quit paddling, I didn't want to be moving 12 mph into the oncoming steep waves. Had no choice though, had to keep paddling to brace and had to keep the canoe moving faster than the current so I could steer the boat into the waves. The waves formed in these conditions are nasty!!! Steep front faces with pointy crests leaping toward the sky and then dropping down but not breaking. Up and down the wave crests move and the space between waves is short.

For unknown reasons to me, the worst waves came in groups lasting what seemed like 10 minutes. I could hear these wave trains coming at me before I could see them in the light of my headlamp. When they appeared, they showed as a series of white topped waves. I don't know why they were white-topped. I think their steepness and height caused the tops to be constantly falling forward or backward and the wind was blowing spray off their tops. "KILLING WAVES" are what they were.

For nearly an hour these killing waves tried....

An hour that seemed like the longest hour of my life...

An hour that's mine only to understand or not...

"If you're up against a bruiser and you're getting knocked about- Grin. ... If you're up against it badly, then it's only one on you, So Grin. ... If Fate should down you, just get up and take another cuff; ... And Grin."
Excerpts from Robert Service's "Grin"

At 10:39 pm I made land, the tracker started recording again, and I was safe. Take a look at my Delorme map page at this location and you'll see it didn't record the crossing. Maybe the satellites couldn't record time and position as things stood still for me.

The rest of the river was relatively easy to paddle, just had to paddle hard near shore to overcome the current. Nothing dangerous.

I later learned that the Village of Nakeen is a ghost town because the river channel abandoned the town leaving little river access.
 
02/08/2015 01:44PM  
Thanks. I can only imagine what that must have been like in the darkness with only a headlamp. Would make for some good footage with a go pro. I bet your language was colorful. :)



 
Dave1111
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02/12/2015 10:06AM  
I recall somewhere that you estimated you were using the single bent blade 95% of the time. Were you using it in Kvichak Bay with those wave trains? If so, I assume the double was stowed beneath the skirt and you were bracing with the single from time to time. I find bracing a bit inefficient with a short, 14 degree bent. Do you think now in retrospect that it would have been worth having a straight single blade with you? Was there ever a time when, perhaps like in the Kvichak Bay, conditions got so bad that you found yourself using the bent single and unable to safely get at the double but desiring it? And just grinning, perhaps. Did you end up using the double more often in the Bering Sea and Kvichak River and Bay because of all the shallows? If so, did using the double noticeably slow you down or fatigue you more than using the single?

Thanks, thanks again is all I can say.
 
02/12/2015 04:46PM  
quote Dave1111: "I recall somewhere that you estimated you were using the single bent blade 95% of the time. Were you using it in Kvichak Bay with those wave trains? If so, I assume the double was stowed beneath the skirt and you were bracing with the single from time to time. I find bracing a bit inefficient with a short, 14 degree bent. Do you think now in retrospect that it would have been worth having a straight single blade with you? Was there ever a time when, perhaps like in the Kvichak Bay, conditions got so bad that you found yourself using the bent single and unable to safely get at the double but desiring it? And just grinning, perhaps. Did you end up using the double more often in the Bering Sea and Kvichak River and Bay because of all the shallows? If so, did using the double noticeably slow you down or fatigue you more than using the single?"
Yes, I was using my single blade bent shaft during the Kvichak Bay paddling struggles. I had access to my double blade on top of the deck and could've switched paddles in 10 seconds, but never even considered it. When conditions changed to dangerous it happened really quick and then it was too late to switch and besides I am confident in my single blade and that's what I wanted in my hands. If I was a better kayaker, I may not think this way though.

I didn't miss having a straight shaft paddle. The paddle I had is considered a touring blade and is much bigger than racing blades out there. Was able to get a lot of force for bracing.

Paddle selection: In my planning, I didn't want to duplicate bigger gear items. So bringing a straight shaft and a bent shaft single blades would have been nearly a duplication. I knew I'd be paddling some shallow areas and determined the double blade would be useful for this. Another benefit would be the change in use of some different muscles which if I became wore out or developed pains, I'd be able to switch paddles. As things turned out, the double blade was useful in shallow-water paddling conditions and was faster/more power for short term bursts going upstream on rivers. When conditions allowed, though, I'd switch back to the single blade with relief. So yes- the double blade is more fatiguing and was my "sprint" paddle whereas my single blade was my all day "marathon' paddle.
 
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