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      The Books We Bring     

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07/22/2016 05:53PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
So, how about listing the books we bring to read on canoe trips.

2015 group trip - "Gentleman Bastards" by Kevin Maurer. A reporter was embedded in with the Green Berets in Afghanistan. My son is currently deployed as a Green Beret in Afghanistan till January. I'm pretty sure he bought me that one.

2013 Quetico Solo - "Quetico Adventures" by Tim Mead. This was very fun to read and really got my mind working with all the bushwhacking he's done in Quetico.

2012 BWCA Solo - "Refuge" by Terry Tempest Williams and also "Ely Lives" by Mike Hillman. Refuge was a recommendation by fellow board member "Tremolo" and is a very good story. Ely Lives is fascinating.

2011 Quetico Solo - Beyond Band of Brothers: The war memoirs of Maj. Dick Winters. Loved this one. The true story of the Easy Company commander in the first Band Of Brothers series. My son gave me this one also.

I've also read "Bush Pilots" and "Dorothy Molter: The root beer lady" and Canoeing with the cree". Great reads all!

This September I'll be bringing Brendan Burchard's "The Motivation Manifesto" and also "The Baron in the Trees" by Italo Calvino. The Baron will be my first fiction book on a trip. It comes highly recommended by Tim Ferriss who has a great podcast that I love.

Anybody else care to share?


 
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gymcoachdon
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07/22/2016 09:56PM  
Well, since I only have one trip under my belt:
2015 Solo "The Singing Wilderness" by Sigurd Olson

I really liked the fact that it is a collection of short stories / essays. I could read for 10 minutes, and have a nice ending point, or I could read 3 or 4 stories if I had more time.
I have since acquired a copy of (and have read) all of his books, even bought an old copy of National Geographic that he did an article on the Voyageurs in. I really like his style of writing, somehow connects with me.
And thanks to you, I just ordered a copy of Quetico Adventures. Now if I can keep from reading it before September, that may be what I read on this years trip.
 
mastertangler
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07/23/2016 06:07AM  
I always have the New Testament with me......

I read "Wild" which is definitely a must read.......hard to put down for 3 solid days and I admit it "hurt" my fishing time a bit but is a fabulous read......much better than the movie.

Tom I like reading about our armed services as well. A book which might interest you is called "Easy Company soldier" .........Dick Winters was much admired........I have it on audio and listen to it while travelling. Excellent! Quite a contrast to the "Cupcake generation" we have now (present company excluded of course ;-)
 
07/23/2016 06:32AM  
quote mastertangler: "
Tom I like reading about our armed services as well. A book which might interest you is called "Easy Company soldier" .........Dick Winters was much admired........I have it on audio and listen to it while travelling. Excellent! Quite a contrast to the "Cupcake generation" we have now (present company excluded of course ;-)"


I just ordered the audio and it's in my Itunes now. We live in amazing times! Thanks MT, I really look forward to hearing this one.

Times have dramatically changed since the 1940's. There's no going back though. Glad these guys wrote their stories for us.

 
mastertangler
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07/23/2016 07:54AM  
I picked up a nook to take on my upcoming trip. So far I have 3 books on it.

Red Platoon by Clinton Romesha

Roughriders: Theodore Roosevelt, his cowboy regiment and the immortal charge up San Juan Hill by Mark Lee

Grendel by John Gardener

I will load a few more.......probably "My Utmost for His Highest" which I have always wanted to bring but was always to heavy as well as a book called "The law of confession" which speaks to the power in our lives about the words we speak.

Glad you got the audio Tom......you won't be disappointed.
 
Alan Gage
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07/23/2016 08:37AM  
Fun topic!

A few years ago I read To Kill a Mockingbird for the first time on a WCPP trip.
Last year I took it along again for a re-read as well as The Stranger by Camus and Fathers and Sons by Turgenev for a 30 day solo.

Leaving in a week for a 45 day solo (with dog) and need to peruse the book shelves to see what's coming along this year.

Alan
 
Cloznuff
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07/23/2016 09:43AM  
I usually will bring a Sigurd Olson book and a John Sanford book. John Sanford has several murder mystery type books with 2 main characters. The stories are always based in Minnesota and northern Mn and the BW are mentioned quite often. Another book I will bring with even though I've probably read it a dozen times is Fawn Island by Doug Wood.
 
07/23/2016 10:29AM  
Nothing in particular; whatever I happen to be reading at the time. On my solo a month ago I had a couple of books by Steve Hamilton. I like mysteries/suspense novels during the summer; authors like Lee Child, Vince Flynn, Carl Hiaasen, James Lee Burke, John Sandford, CJ Box, Robert Crais, John Grisham, Michael Connelly, William Kent Krueger, etc. Nice, easy reads. I also got a kindle a couple years ago, and that makes it real easy to ensure that I never run out of reading material.
 
07/23/2016 04:01PM  
quote Alan Gage: "Fun topic!
A few years ago I read To Kill a Mockingbird for the first time on a WCPP trip.
Last year I took it along again for a re-read as well as The Stranger by Camus and Fathers and Sons by Turgenev for a 30 day solo.
Leaving in a week for a 45 day solo (with dog) and need to peruse the book shelves to see what's coming along this year.
Alan"


Wow! Here's me thinking my 13 nighter is some big deal. You and MT are putting me to shame. Ha Ha.

 
07/23/2016 04:28PM  
Always an interesting topic. I don't read as much on the actual BW trip as I do on the long trip up and back. I tried audio books one time, but found that didn't really work well for me.

I often end up with related reading - stuff by Sig Olson, Barry Lopez, John McPhee, Bernd Heinrich, among others. Or things like Canoeing with the Cree, A Death on the Barrens, Lost in the Wild, Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, Great Heart (a synthesis of the three books about the Hubbard-Wallace expeditions into Labrador), The Raven's Gift.

Short essays are good as mentioned by somebody, or short story compilations, and books of poetry.

The last couple of times I've been reading the fiction works of Sjon. Also have enjoyed some Cormac McCarthy, James Salter, Peter Matthiessen, Rick Bass, Jim Harrison, and others.
 
Alan Gage
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07/23/2016 04:55PM  
Interesting that some take reading material directly related to canoe tripping while others don't. Reasons why and why not?

Personally I think if I took books on canoe tripping, or outdoorsy stuff in general, that I'd tend to look and think through the author's eyes. I'd rather it be my experience alone.

This year I'm struggling with it. I'll be very closely following Downe's route in Sleeping Island, one of my favorite books, and the tempation to bring it, along with some of his journal excerpts from another book when he traveled in the area, is very strong. It would be neat to follow along in his daily journal and see the actual places right before my eyes and find his old campsites.

But on the other hand I'm afraid I'd be so "on the lookout" for the rock formations, camp sites, islands, grave sites, etc, which are mentioned in the book, that I'd in effect have blinders on to everything else.

I think I'll leave his books at home and try to travel with my own eyes and thoughts. No doubt I'll miss some interesting things and places but that's ok. Hopefully I'll find equally interesting things on my own that weren't mentioned in the book. It will be fun to compare my notes with his over the winter as I re-read his writings.

Alan
 
07/24/2016 01:30PM  
The book I would love to read weighs about 4 lbs. at 558 pages. It's called "The Early Years: The journals of Richard Proenneke 1967-1973 compiled by John Branson. I would bring this if I intended on basecamping for 2 weeks and didn't want to fish.

Dick Proenneke was a fascinating character and I can't wait to someday binge read this one like I did the later one "More Readings from One Man's Wilderness 1974-1980".



 
07/24/2016 04:01PM  
That's the kind you need to put on an e-reader, but you might need a lot of extra battery power ;).
 
Duckman
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07/25/2016 10:06AM  
I have an old paperback of call of the wild and white fang. I read call of the wild the first night and white fang the last night.
 
07/26/2016 04:55AM  
Never brought a book on a solo, if I'm not outside doing things I'm in the tent sleeping, even on none traveling days, maybe when I'm a little older and slow down I'll start doing that.
 
mastertangler
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07/26/2016 07:13AM  
Older and slower? Thems fighting words (even if they're true > LOL )

I picked up a few more books for the nook last night......"papillon" which has always intrigued me somewhat........and a book about the Texas Ranger that killed Bonnie and Clyde......Hammer.......52 gunfights. A man that John Wayne would of looked up to ;-)

Reading is great in canoe country.......after "go-go" it's nice to veg for a while.
 
OldFingers57
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07/26/2016 08:20AM  
I read a lot of books by Clive Cussler, Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child, & Steve Berry
 
07/26/2016 09:06AM  
quote mastertangler: "Older and slower? Thems fighting words (even if they're true > LOL )


I picked up a few more books for the nook last night......"papillon" which has always intrigued me somewhat........and a book about the Texas Ranger that killed Bonnie and Clyde......Hammer.......52 gunfights. A man that John Wayne would of looked up to ;-)


Reading is great in canoe country.......after "go-go" it's nice to veg for a while. "
Didn't mean to offend anybody, my day is coming.
 
mastertangler
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07/27/2016 09:19PM  
It's all good Housty.......so I'm old, fat and slow......and like to read books. ;-)

Couldn't wait and started reading "Red Platoon" on the Nook. Read chapter one and I can tell already it's going to be a freakin awesome read.

When I took the highly recommended book "Wild" on a 9 day Basswood solo I must admit to hunkering down and reading for almost 3 days (had a hard time putting it down)........but it was an extremely enjoyable way to spend time in canoe country........I am looking forward to using the Nook......small, powerful, fairly lightweight. Glad to have a solar panel to recharge if need be.
 
Banksiana
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07/27/2016 09:50PM  
I take a Kindle- weeks on a charge (turn off wifi). Many books. Self-Illuminating, lightweight. Can't be used to start a fire. I'm old, read lots but am not slow Mr. Housty.
 
ZaraSp00k
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07/28/2016 06:31AM  
since the Canadian shield is primarily oligotrophic lakes, and seem very primordial, I like books on early history, the various Hindu texts, early American Indian history, scientific books discussing the movement of people across the earth & genetics, geology, ....when you are out their alone, it reminds me of the various science fiction works where some space traveler is on an unihabited planet that may one day contain life.
 
joshmontague
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07/28/2016 07:08AM  
Different trips...different books. A Bible always goes along with me, though.

A week ago, I was with my sons, nephew, dad, and bro-in-law. No time for reading, unfortunately.

Next week I have a four-day "working" solo, reading and studying for a class I'm teaching in Serbia in September. I'll bring a pack of books for that as I base camp near an entry point and sit in a comfy chair with a notebook and my reading list. Goal is a book a day.

Immediately after that, I'll ditch the heavy books and join my father for an 8-day trip out of Meeds. We'll travel two days, base camp two days, repeat. Along with my Bible, I've got Annie Dillard's "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek" in small paperback. Always wanted to read that one. I'll also bring some wildernessy novel.

Nothing beats a comfy seat, a good view, strong coffee, and a book.
 
mastertangler
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07/28/2016 07:16AM  
quote Banksiana: "I take a Kindle- weeks on a charge (turn off wifi). Many books. Self-Illuminating, lightweight. Can't be used to start a fire. I'm old, read lots but am not slow Mr. Housty."

I had considered taking the Kindle......my daughter had one she no longer was using......but it seemed a bit on the large side.......probably a 1/3 bigger than the Nook from what I could see.

I have been with several "speedy" guys and I find in the afternoon they are starting to wear out. Especially on longer trips............I find methodical, efficient, steady tripping styles which take advantage of early starts and late finishes will make just fine time.
 
Banksiana
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07/28/2016 10:29AM  
quote mastertangler

I had considered taking the Kindle......my daughter had one she no longer was using......but it seemed a bit on the large side.......probably a 1/3 bigger than the Nook from what I could see.

"


The Kindle I use is 6.4 X 4.5", virtually identical to the Nook in size.

My tripping style is more meditative than hurried. I take what the day gives me and change plans and routes as moved. Though I am often moved to cover some distance.....
 
07/28/2016 04:31PM  
quote ZaraSp00k: "since the Canadian shield is primarily oligotrophic lakes, and seem very primordial, I like books on early history, the various Hindu texts, early American Indian history, scientific books discussing the movement of people across the earth & genetics, geology, ....when you are out their alone, it reminds me of the various science fiction works where some space traveler is on an unihabited planet that may one day contain life."

I'm currently listening to the audio of this book called Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. It came highly recommended and it's not letting me down. Pretty amazing read actually and I think you'd enjoy it very much.



 
07/28/2016 04:37PM  
quote mastertangler: "

Tom I like reading about our armed services as well. A book which might interest you is called "Easy Company soldier" .........Dick Winters was much admired........I have it on audio and listen to it while travelling. Excellent! Quite a contrast to the "Cupcake generation" we have now (present company excluded of course ;-)"


MT thanks for this recommendation. I loved it! Very good audiobook. Now you got me re-watching the Band Of Brothers. My wife does not thank you. :) Hey, it's better than those Housewives shows she likes.





 
OldGreyGoose
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07/28/2016 07:03PM  
No books. Crossword puzzles. --Goose
 
sunnybear09
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07/28/2016 07:48PM  
quote housty9: "Never brought a book on a solo, if I'm not outside doing things I'm in the tent sleeping, even on none traveling days, maybe when I'm a little older and slow down I'll start doing that."

+1--I always want to bring a book because it is my nature to read, but hate to do what I can do better at home. I study maps when I am not outside, looking ahead to the current routes and looking for new ones. I take an AM/FM/weather radio and if tent-bound I like to listen to the local stations like WTIP, WELY, and any NPR station I can receive. I like the local programs for their take on local interests, the nifty accents, and local news. I am an info junkie. Also I can't read comfortably lying down or sitting on a log. If I am outside I sit in my chair and look at my surroundings, near and far--that's what I'm there for. And I can always sleep for pleasure--to me it's bonus time.
 
07/28/2016 09:45PM  
I bring a copy of Luthers Small Catechism with me. It helps to put things in perspective. I also bring a book on astronomy that has the star charts I use to see the evening wonders with a pair of binoculars.
 
07/28/2016 09:45PM  
I bring a copy of Luthers Small Catechism with me. It helps to put things in perspective. I also bring a book on astronomy that has the star charts I use to see the evening wonders with a pair of binoculars.
 
MHS67
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07/28/2016 11:17PM  
All I bring is Louis L'Amour. A weeks trip I need 3 books. If the fishing is really good, then 2 books!
 
07/29/2016 06:52AM  
quote Sierra1: "I bring a copy of Luthers Small Catechism with me. It helps to put things in perspective. I also bring a book on astronomy that has the star charts I use to see the evening wonders with a pair of binoculars. "

I've always wanted to learn more about astronomy. Do you have any book recommendations?

 
hobbydog
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07/29/2016 01:57PM  
quote sunnybear09: "quote housty9: "Never brought a book on a solo, if I'm not outside doing things I'm in the tent sleeping, even on none traveling days, maybe when I'm a little older and slow down I'll start doing that."


+1--I always want to bring a book because it is my nature to read, but hate to do what I can do better at home. I study maps when I am not outside, looking ahead to the current routes and looking for new ones. I take an AM/FM/weather radio and if tent-bound I like to listen to the local stations like WTIP, WELY, and any NPR station I can receive. I like the local programs for their take on local interests, the nifty accents, and local news. I am an info junkie. Also I can't read comfortably lying down or sitting on a log. If I am outside I sit in my chair and look at my surroundings, near and far--that's what I'm there for. And I can always sleep for pleasure--to me it's bonus time."


+2 I can read anytime anywhere (I love to read) the rest of the year. My time in the woods is doing things I daydream about 50 weeks out of the year. I do write in my journal though.
 
hobbydog
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07/29/2016 02:02PM  
quote mastertangler: "
I read "Wild" which is definitely a must read.......hard to put down for 3 solid days and I admit it "hurt" my fishing time a bit but is a fabulous read......much better than the movie. "


I agree. I read the book and then the movie. I was so disappointed in the movie but then it would have had to been a 6 hours long movie to tell the whole backstory. It was interesting how much she read along the way. Like I mentioned, I don't bring books with but if I did it would be this one if for no other reason than to motivate me on the next long portage.
 
PiperMike
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07/31/2016 11:06PM  
I only have one trip under my belt, but I brought
The ragamuffen gospel
And
A walk in the woods.
Both great books to read alone and if you have a lot of time on your hands
Mike
 
UphillHarry
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08/02/2016 07:45PM  
Someone on this forum turned me on to a book called Sleeping Island by P.G. Downes. 1940s canoeing adventure in canada written by a geology professor . I found it very enjoyable.

I have the original Nook. Lasts for several weeks on a single charge at my reading pace.

And in case you are not aware of it, you can get a lot of e-reader versions of old classic books for free from the the Gutenburg Project including White Fang and Call of the Wild that were mentioned earlier.
 
08/03/2016 10:35PM  
Fire in the Bones
 
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