BWCA Helinox Cot One Lightweight Backpacking Boundary Waters Gear Forum
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2rivers
senior member (54)senior membersenior member
 
06/22/2017 01:46PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
Just a shout out on a piece of equipment that I rented from Piragis. I'm not a rental kind of guy however with a $300 price tag I wanted to give this cot a solid weeks trial prior to a purchase. The Helinox Lightweight Cot One tested out amazing. I'm a 6'2" 245 kind of guy and I have logged in 17 BWCA trips, however the days of me sleeping on the ground are over. The Helinox Cot is made of lightweight material with very sturdy cot material and side rails. I did have concerns about the Cot feet on the tent floor however they proved to be not an issue at all. I did use my Thermarest on top of the cot for some extra comfort. All said and done I would recommend this Cot to all.
 
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Grandma L
distinguished member(5499)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
06/22/2017 04:39PM  
Is that the low Helinox cot?
 
2rivers
senior member (54)senior membersenior member
 
06/22/2017 05:51PM  
Yes, this cot is maybe 3-4" off the ground.
 
JimmyJustice
distinguished member(651)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
06/23/2017 06:05AM  
My experience with that cot was just ok. The fabric, while taught, rested on the horizontal ribs so even with my sleeping pad, I could feel each cross bar. I did, however, like how compact and light it was. It fits easily within your pack and is simple to set up.
 
06/23/2017 07:11AM  
Have assembled and laid on a few.
Certainly not a lightweight backpacking item, and something I would not use as I'm comfy with my pad and bag setup.
If it works for you, use it.

My gripes without using a Helinox cot are the weight and pack size, no thermal benefit so still need an insulated pad/mattress. Cots are actually colder due to convective heat loss. I have and do use cots when vehicle based camping, so I do know what they offer and what they do not.

butthead
 
2rivers
senior member (54)senior membersenior member
 
06/23/2017 09:13AM  
I'm interested in how you set the cot up to be able to feel the ribs. I'm a big guy and never did I feel any of the ribs of the cot while sleeping. Packability was great and for canoe camping the weight was not an issue. Would I use it on the AT, no. Would I use it for a winter camping trip more then likely, no. But for summer camping for sure.
 
Northwoodsman
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06/23/2017 06:33PM  
quote JimmyJustice: "My experience with that cot was just ok. The fabric, while taught, rested on the horizontal ribs so even with my sleeping pad, I could feel each cross bar. I did, however, like how compact and light it was. It fits easily within your pack and is simple to set up. "

Ribs? Mine has 3 legs that rest on the ground, or just above it in the middle and there is no way physically possible you could stretch the cloth enough to touch those. I weigh 310 lbs. and the fabric barely stretches with me on it. There are a few other brands (I think the Thermarest model) that may have ribs.

I have two Cot Ones and I really like them. I just don't like them enough to carry them into the BWCA. I do use them with an Exped Downmat 9 for warmth and extra added comfort.
 
Gadfly
distinguished member (429)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/27/2022 09:19AM  
I just purchased one of these and wondering if anyone has the legs to go along with it and if you would recommend purchasing those as well. I most likely would not use this cot on any summer trips to the BWCA but would for winter and other camping trips where weight and space is not an issue. I am quite amazed at how sturdy this cot is for how lightweight it is. I was going to purchase the legs with the cot but they are out of stock and I couldn't find them in stock anywhere.
 
Northwoodsman
distinguished member(1819)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/27/2022 10:15AM  
Gadfly: "I just purchased one of these and wondering if anyone has the legs to go along with it and if you would recommend purchasing those as well. I most likely would not use this cot on any summer trips to the BWCA but would for winter and other camping trips where weight and space is not an issue. I am quite amazed at how sturdy this cot is for how lightweight it is. I was going to purchase the legs with the cot but they are out of stock and I couldn't find them in stock anywhere. "
Did you get the one that the legs work with? I would get the legs if you can find them. Gets you up of the ground, slightly warmer in winter. Gives you some added storage space. Gives you a place to sit as well. I would put something under the feet to keep them from damaging tent floor.

I don't think that I have used my Cot Ones since my last post in 2017. I haven't done any none BWCA camping since then. Anybody looking for a good deal on two Helinox Cot Ones?
 
bombinbrian
distinguished member (333)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/27/2022 10:25AM  
I might be your huckleberry
 
LilyPond
distinguished member (381)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/27/2022 07:14PM  
Gadfly: "I just purchased one of these and wondering if anyone has the legs to go along with it and if you would recommend purchasing those as well."

Yes, I have the Cot One Convertible and bought the legs separately. I do highly recommend them, with the caveat that you need a tent that's a minimum of about 55" tall to use the legs if you don't want to feel claustrophobic. Many 4P car camping tents are tall enough. I know of no 3P that's tall enough, but I have a clever way of adding several inches to the height of a 3P if anyone is interested.

The extra legs add a bit over 1 lb in weight. They can be crammed into the Cot One bag with some difficulty. You need to put some kind of foot or padding on them to avoid damaging the floor of your tent. I got rubber chair tips and those work pretty well. Helinox likes to leave things like this out of their designs so they can sell you something expensive later to fix the design flaw.

I always use the Cot One convertible (without the extra legs) for kayak camping. I would not go without it. So much extra comfort for so little weight. If it fits in my kayak hatches, you have room for it in your canoe! (If you're willing to portage it . . . )

For car camping, the Cot One Convertible is surprisingly rugged and easy to set up (3 minutes) and take down (2 minutes) once you get the hang of it. The extra legs are a pain (there are 12 of them!) but they only add 1 minute to the assembly.

On a cot you need about a 2" to 3" *insulated* mattress. Not more than that---4" is pretty bouncy on a cot. In my experience, a good mattress on a good cot is way more comfortable than the mattress on the ground. It has a suspended or cradle feeling. As for warmth, an Exped mattress with a rating around 0 degrees F will keep you plenty warm on a cot. I notice no difference in warmth between a mattress on a cot and a mattress on the ground. I've slept on cots down to 5 degrees with a good down sleeping bag and 0F mattress.
 
LilyPond
distinguished member (381)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/27/2022 07:35PM  
JimmyJustice: "My experience with that cot was just ok. The fabric, while taught, rested on the horizontal ribs so even with my sleeping pad, I could feel each cross bar. "

I know this is an old thread but I just wanted to say that the above comment, if it pertains to the Helinox Cot One, is inaccurate. It's not possible to hit the "ribs." The fabric is drum tight and the cross pieces on the legs are several inches below the fabric surface.
 
Gadfly
distinguished member (429)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
04/29/2022 01:34PM  
Thanks for the responses. I will plan on purchasing the legs as soon as they become available, I like the idea of being able to store items underneath it. I have tried it out in the house and am impressed on how comfortable and light it is. Can't wait to make use of it.
 
Paddle4Hike
senior member (54)senior membersenior member
 
04/30/2022 07:39PM  
LilyPond
I’ll bite…..what is your method to adapt a 3P tent for additional height?
I always love to learn new ideas, tips, tricks and solutions on this site!
Thanks
 
LilyPond
distinguished member (381)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/02/2022 12:24PM  
Paddle4Hike: "LilyPond
I’ll bite…..what is your method to adapt a 3P tent for additional height?
I always love to learn new ideas, tips, tricks and solutions on this site!
Thanks"


How to add height to a 2P or 3P tent

First, some caveats. This is weird, but it works. I was sick of carrying a 4P tent for one person just to get enough height for a 15" cot. There is no 2P or 3P on the market that's tall enough for a 15" cot. This method will result in losing a few inches in the width of the tent on each side, so you will end up with a tall one-person tent. It works better with a 2P because the sides of a 3P are more slanted inward, and the ends of the cot may hit the ends of the tent. The bottom of the door will end up higher so you will need to step over it. Not a problem, since to get out of the tent you simply stand up from the cot and step out.

It takes only a couple of seconds to set up the extensions: just pull out the extension to the right length, tighten the screw, and you're done!

Basically, you make 4 leg extenders about 9" long using 1/2" diameter metal rods. You attach them to your poles using #8 worm-drive hose clamps with a thumb screw. Mark a couple of different lengths on the rods so you know where to place the rod on the pole. To store in the stuff sack, loosen the clamp and move the extender up. If you attach the hose clamp at the right angle with the right tension, you will still be able to fit the grommet on the tent strap on the end of the pole as normal. The four extenders will only add a few ounces of weight and the poles should fit in the original stuff sack. The clamp will scratch the pole, so wrap the pole with tape if that concerns you.

Photos: (1) First prototype using tomato stakes. The tent is the original Kelty Trail Ridge 2, 45" tall. The stakes bring the height to 50", which leaves 35" above the top of the cot. That should be enough to sit on the cot and change your clothes, though your head will probably touch the top if you're tall. (2) Upgraded version with metal rods and thumb screw clamp. I got the rods by taking apart a folding camp stool https://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Portable-Folding-Backpacking-Travelling/dp/B07GB7K479/ref=psdc_3400831_t1_B08R1LWCK2?th=1 The rods were the exact right length; I just drilled out the rivets.

What do you think of my idea?

For mechanically inclined folks, a better solution would be to place the pole inside the metal tube, stop it at the top somehow, and find a way to insert the peg that's in the end of the pole (attached to the bungee cord) into the end of the tube. I bet a washer placed over the end of the tube could achieve that. The bungees would need to be lengthened.


 
ockycamper
distinguished member(906)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
05/15/2022 06:19PM  
Why not switch to a hammock and save all that weight? You have the best comfort/back support system, they can function as a chair, and many are just over 1 lb.
 
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