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Mad_Angler
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07/05/2017 09:00AM  
There was a recent thread about tarp setup. It included a link about the center ridgeline setup.

I've been on 15 BW trips. I have several CCS tarps. I always used a front ridgeline. I liked having the windward side very low to protect against wind and rain.

Well... I just got back from my wettest trip by far. I switched one tarp to a center ridgeline just for fun. It worked much better than I expected. It was great. I very quickly changed my other tarp to a center ridgeline. I was amazed at how well it protected against wind-driven rain. I especially liked not having to restring my tarp each time the wind directed switched.

I'm a convert now...

Center ridgeline
 
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WHendrix
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07/05/2017 10:17AM  
If you have not tried it, take a look at the Ridgeline Stuffsack that CCS sells. Here's a link to a Utube of it in action.

Ridgeline Stuff Sack
 
Grandma L
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07/05/2017 10:51AM  
I use a Bishop's bag instead. It has a draw string on each end and is very easy to make.
 
ozarkpaddler
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07/05/2017 05:19PM  
I prefer the center ridgeline myself. I was just at Trails End and not in the BWCAW this time, so this time the setup was a little easier; felt like cheating this time!

 
DanCooke
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07/06/2017 11:05AM  
I believe the ridgeline set up for rectangular flat tarps makes the set up very quick.

The Ridgeline Lean Stuff Sack that is in Hoop's is quite different than a Bishop bag.
Both have the ability to have the tarp preset on the ridgeline of the tarp.

The Bishop bag is a fixed volume bag. The Ridgeline Lean Stuff Sack from CCS has two different volumes. When fully extended there is 280 cu inches, When sealed off at the lower cord there is 130 cu inches of volume. This makes it much easier to stuff the tarp into the larger volume and then compress it to the smaller volume. The handle on the bottom makes it easy to pull the tarp out of the stuff sack.

The two volume stuff sack allows you then to store the tarp in a less compressed state then a fixed volume bag.

Hoop's video is very good. When setting up in trees I use a Siberian Hitch for the first ridgeline anchor knot and then a Truckers hitch for the second anchor knot.
 
Fizics
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07/06/2017 05:36PM  
My set up is more geared to assist my hammock, but it serves just as easily as a group tarp when rigged in "porch mode"

My first tarp is a CCS 12x10 that I have rigged with a center ridgeline of Lash-It (my all time favorite small diameter rope). My second tarp is a 9x9 Nemo Bugout that I rigged the same way, but the ridgeline runs longways along the hypotenuse of the square. Both of them have a "dumb" end I call it, just a micro caribiner that can hold a lot of weight (it's titanium) that I clip onto the rop itself around the tree. The "smart" end of the rope has about 20' extra of rope, with a Dutchware Wasp, makes it an absolute breeze tying up my ridgeline and getting it as tight as I need it. I can get it so tight I bring along an "extension" line of the same rope that has a loop on one end, I tie it off to a tree, and use the loop to tigthen my tarp rope + wasp around. It can span 50-60 feet if trees are REALLY crappy on a site, and the rope is tight enough to hang clothes on yet.

The tie-offs are another story, I have 8 tarp worms from Dutchware and each tarp worm is on a loop about 8" around of 1/8" shock cord tied to itself with double fishermans knots. I just loop the shock cord loop through itself on the tarp tie outs wherever I need them, and then stake it out with those tarp worms, I tigthen em up on the shock cord so the tarp stays nice and tight when drenched. It's most commonly deployed in a A-Frame shape for my hammock, but it easily ties out for other uses, usually I'll tie one end of it level (so that half the tarp is flat about neck level) and the other end angled down to cut out wind, and we still have plenty of room to sit.

My favorite part is launching/packing. I have snakeskins on my tarp, but I just use a couple dealybobs for my Nemo. Both of them you just grab both corners and start rolling up towards the ridgeline, and use the dealybobs to keep it rolled up, take down the smart end, then dumb end, and stuff it into your sack and go! I do giggle every time I see a tarp being folded delicately in the BWCA lol
 
jhb8426
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07/08/2017 07:29PM  
quote Mad_Angler: "There was a recent thread about tarp setup. It included a link about the center ridgeline setup.
Center ridgeline "


Hmmm unfortunately Hoop's pics have been disable by photobucket's recent policy change regarding 3rd party hosting. That's too bad as they are very informative.
 
Mad_Angler
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07/10/2017 08:48AM  
quote jhb8426: "Hmmm unfortunately Hoop's pics have been disable by photobucket's recent policy change regarding 3rd party hosting. That's too bad as they are very informative."

That does stink. The linked article had a lot of very good pictures...
 
07/10/2017 11:28AM  
quote jhb8426: "quote Mad_Angler: "There was a recent thread about tarp setup. It included a link about the center ridgeline setup.
Center ridgeline "



Hmmm unfortunately Hoop's pics have been disable by photobucket's recent policy change regarding 3rd party hosting. That's too bad as they are very informative."


WHendrix's link will take you to his (Hoop's) YouTube video - same thing.
 
07/10/2017 02:16PM  
Maybe not clear what I meant by "same thing" ;) - it's the same setup and information but the whole video is still there, which is better than the original post with pictures anyway.
 
mgraber
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07/15/2017 01:53AM  
I consider Dan's tarps, and stuff sack to be indispensable. The dual compartments make set up and take down a breeze .The ridge line set up is my favorite way to rig by far and the You Tube video is great.
 
07/15/2017 08:05AM  

I just returned from a 10 day Quetico trip and got schooled by Pineknot on how to properly setup a Ridgeline with Prussics and CCS Ridge Bag.

I am now a convert. Simple and very effective way to rig a tarp. It will be my "go to" tarp setup method on all future trips
 
kona
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07/15/2017 08:25AM  
I'm setting up a recently purchased 10x14 ccs with ridgeline lean bag.

How many guylines would you reccomend for 10x14', and of what length(s)?
 
mastertangler
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07/15/2017 08:50AM  
Slick!
 
07/15/2017 10:02AM  
quote kona: "I'm setting up a recently purchased 10x14 ccs with ridgeline lean bag.


How many guylines would you reccomend for 10x14', and of what length(s)?"


Six - the 4 corners and the center on each side makes it more solid in wind. I like having at least 20 feet of guyline attached to each one - it is adequate for most situations/rigs and saves the time of adding additional lengths. I bundle each guyline up with a "hair thing".
 
07/15/2017 10:11AM  
quote mastertangler: "Slick!"

MT, it is, and I'll add that it's especially helpful for the soloist - like having an extra couple of hands :).
 
mastertangler
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07/15/2017 10:44AM  
quote boonie: "quote mastertangler: "Slick!"


MT, it is, and I'll add that it's especially helpful for the soloist - like having an extra couple of hands :)."


I like it........the only thing I have some curiosity about is getting the center ridgeline high enough to be satisfactory. I have seen where some posters have come up with all sorts of "methods" to achieve this, some of which includes tossing lines which does not fit with my style. But I have never tried a different method except what Cliff Jacobson suggests so I am not qualified to give an opinion on this specific method .........merely conjecture.

I will probably be content to keep doing what I have been as it certainly gets the job done quickly, with strength and efficiency. Perhaps someday I will go with someone who will educate me as to a better way.

 
07/15/2017 11:04AM  
I can't help you with that, MT, I have the same problem ;). I'm not even very good at setting it up period, but I only do it when I have to. I would like to be able to get at least one end high enough to stand up straight though.
 
Northwoodsman
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07/15/2017 12:29PM  
The things that I struggle with are knots, both tying and untying, and tension. I have been practicing knots via Youtube for the last couple of weeks. I purchased the CCS Ridgeline bag last year for my CCS tarp. I think I have finally figured out my ultimate setup and am satisfied that I can get my tarp deployed within a couple of minutes and won't be fidgeting with it for an hour to get it just right. Like Dan pointed out above, the Siberian Hitch or one similar on the first end and a Trucker's Hitch on the second end is the key. I also have a prusik knot with a short line on each end of the tarp at the ridgeline so once the ridgeline is in place I can slide my pre-rigged tarp into position and make it taunt. I then grab the 4 corner lines that are already attached and run them to whatever I will fasten them to and do another quick knot, most likely another Trucker's Hitch on each one. It works well in my garage now I just hope it works well in the field. I just have to remind myself to take my time, don't rush it, and don't second guess myself and change my mind at the last minute. I just received my new rope supply from CCS. Last year I got frustrated because I couldn't get my knots undone and cut them off. Evidently it wasn't a faulty rope, it was operator error (patience). LOL.

I learned these great tips from many of you on this site and from CCS's site. I found some great knot videos on Youtube and the rewind function is my best friend.
 
Northwoodsman
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07/15/2017 12:29PM  
Double post.
 
Grouseguy1
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07/15/2017 02:24PM  
Kondos tarps have a sewn in center ridgeline, which is nice
 
OldFingers57
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07/15/2017 02:52PM  
quote Northwoodsman: "The things that I struggle with are knots, both tying and untying, and tension. I have been practicing knots via Youtube for the last couple of weeks. I purchased the CCS Ridgeline bag last year for my CCS tarp. I think I have finally figured out my ultimate setup and am satisfied that I can get my tarp deployed within a couple of minutes and won't be fidgeting with it for an hour to get it just right. Like Dan pointed out above, the Siberian Hitch or one similar on the first end and a Trucker's Hitch on the second end is the key. I also have a prusik knot with a short line on each end of the tarp at the ridgeline so once the ridgeline is in place I can slide my pre-rigged tarp into position and make it taunt. I then grab the 4 corner lines that are already attached and run them to whatever I will fasten them to and do another quick knot, most likely another Trucker's Hitch on each one. It works well in my garage now I just hope it works well in the field. I just have to remind myself to take my time, don't rush it, and don't second guess myself and change my mind at the last minute. I just received my new rope supply from CCS. Last year I got frustrated because I couldn't get my knots undone and cut them off. Evidently it wasn't a faulty rope, it was operator error (patience). LOL.


I learned these great tips from many of you on this site and from CCS's site. I found some great knot videos on Youtube and the rewind function is my best friend."



For knots on your tie out lines I use a quick release sheet bend as I have some short sections of rope on each tie out to tie my longer line onto. Then at the stake end I use a trucker's hitch again with a quick release knot to secure it. Both ends can be untied quickly with just a pull of the free end. A for knot videos Animated knots by Grog is great. Animated knots by Grog
 
07/15/2017 03:03PM  
You can set the continuous ridgeline as high as you can reach, so there shouldn't be an issue with headroom.
 
WHendrix
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07/15/2017 03:11PM  
I bought the Ridgeline Stuff Sack this year at the Midwest Mountaineering Expo and used it a few weeks ago on Basswood. It saved our butts twice when we were approaching camp just ahead of a storm. We were able to quickly deploy the tarp and stay dry. The only drawback is that when you rig the tarp as Hoop describes you have to make a commitment to having the ridgeline either on the long or the short dimension (that's assuming you do not have a square tarp). Taking the time to re-rig it would defeat the purpose of the whole thing. As I said, a strong storm was on our tail and we chose a very marginal campsite the first day. We did get the tarp rigged, (it was pre-rigged with the ridgeline along the long dimension) but because of the topography about a third of it was useless. If we had been able to rig it with the ridgeline along the short dimension it would have worked better. The second day it worked just fine. In fact, at the second site we had enough room to rig both the CCS tarp and a 9x9 Nemo Bugout along the same ridgeline. It's a great product.

Bill
 
07/15/2017 05:38PM  
quote Mad_Angler: "There was a recent thread about tarp setup. It included a link about the center ridgeline setup.

I've been on 15 BW trips. I have several CCS tarps. I always used a front ridgeline. I liked having the windward side very low to protect against wind and rain.

Well... I just got back from my wettest trip by far. I switched one tarp to a center ridgeline just for fun. It worked much better than I expected. It was great. I very quickly changed my other tarp to a center ridgeline. I was amazed at how well it protected against wind-driven rain. I especially liked not having to restring my tarp each time the wind directed switched.

I'm a convert now...


Center ridgeline "


Don't forget you can always bring a canoe up and place it just under the low edge of the tarp for added protection from strong winds.
 
mastertangler
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07/15/2017 07:31PM  
I suppose folks can toss round the positives and negatives of tarp set ups all day long as there is much to consider and many ways of going about things.

Stay with me here as I am just musing out loud. With the center ridge line the ends of the center are secured and guy lines branch out.

With the Cliff Jacobson method you have one side of the tarp fastened directly to the rope at every tie off point. Probably takes a few minutes longer but from a physics standpoint would it be inherently stronger? I.e. one side of the tarp is extremely secure and the other 3 sides are guy lined out. With the addition of a center pole now you are dividing the tarp into 4 smaller quadrants which seems like it would be easier to get drum tight.

I have been in some massive blows and my tarps don't make a bit of racket. No flipping, no flapping.........rock solid. A noisy tarp is unacceptable for me. Any set up will suffice if it is calm.......how does the center ridgeline do in a serious sustained blow?
 
Northwoodsman
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07/15/2017 07:48PM  
MT,

I'm trying to picture Cliff's set-up. So is it a continuous line going through all of the tie points on one edge of the tarp? Or is it a rope secured between two trees and then the tie outs each secured to that? Is it a single rope at each tie out attached to a tree or something similar? It sounds like it could be the same set-up as a ridgeline except along the edge instead of the middle. I just started using a good tarp in the last two years and I guess I just used a ridgeline because I would hang things underneath from the ridgeline . Yup, you guessed it. I had the tarp upside down! And well I'm fessing up... my brother and I paddled most of the Lady Lake chain with our bent shaft paddles backwards as well. That's why I love reading about other peoples successes and failures on here. I have apparently had more failures than I knew about at the time. Maybe we should start a thread (although I'm sure there are already several) fessing up to mistakes that we have made. It would get more laughs than a joke thread.
 
mastertangler
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07/16/2017 06:36AM  
Admirable Northwoodsman...........a fellow with enough humility to be able to laugh at his own mistakes in front of others. When I first got my Zav bent shaft the first thing my engineer pal said was "is there a particular reason you are using the paddle backwards" LOL.............If truth be told probably most of us have made plenty of rookie mistakes.

I am not so sure there is 10 cents difference between set ups. It appears both methods get you along in fine style. I will do Cliff a disservice if I try and explain his method. It is available in the DVD "Forgotten Skills" which I do recommend.

Having said that, and I am not trying to be contentious, I may point out a few further differences. The high point of the center ridgline (without additional center pole) will be as high as you can set the line. But with the Jacobson method that would be the lowest point since the side is attached and the center pole elevates even further. The practical effect would be that at least one entire side of my tarp is high enough to walk comfortably underneath without stooping near the ends. Advantage? Not always but certainly makes for hassle free walking on most days.

The other advantage from a physics perspective is the establishment of the 4 triangularly shaped quadrants. Instead of making 2 rectangles (either side of the center ridgeline) I have made 4 triangle shapes. Of course triangles are the strongest geometric shape.

This all sounds good in theory..........but perhaps the practical application is quite different. After all, lots of folks with whole lots more experience than I use the center ridgline method.
 
07/16/2017 08:31AM  
quote Northwoodsman: "MT,


I'm trying to picture Cliff's set-up. So is it a continuous line going through all of the tie points on one edge of the tarp? Or is it a rope secured between two trees and then the tie outs each secured to that? Is it a single rope at each tie out attached to a tree or something similar? It sounds like it could be the same set-up as a ridgeline except along the edge instead of the middle. I just started using a good tarp in the last two years and I guess I just used a ridgeline because I would hang things underneath from the ridgeline . Yup, you guessed it. I had the tarp upside down! And well I'm fessing up... my brother and I paddled most of the Lady Lake chain with our bent shaft paddles backwards as well. That's why I love reading about other peoples successes and failures on here. I have apparently had more failures than I knew about at the time. Maybe we should start a thread (although I'm sure there are already several) fessing up to mistakes that we have made. It would get more laughs than a joke thread."



NW, I'm not positive, but I believe THIS is the tarp setup style they are referring to. Video is about knots....ignore that and just look at the setup.......single edge ridge and slope, pull out the back or pole/paddle it out.
 
Northwoodsman
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07/16/2017 09:55AM  
Cowdoc & MT, I can see where in a heavy rain that this would have a definite advantage, particularly when accompanied by high winds. One would just have to hope that the wind direction doesn't change at the last minute. That would be my luck. CCS did a good job of showing these different setups in their guide. Last year while camped on a point on Cherokee we set the tarp up between two trees on the edge of the small "bluff" that we were on. We used the ridgeline method but dropped one side almost to the ground to block the significant winds coming off the lake for 2 days. It worked very well. When I first started tripping in my younger years I never realized the benefits of a tarp setup, let alone a good quality tarp with a well planned, strategic setup.
 
Mad_Angler
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07/16/2017 09:53PM  
MT..

CCS has loops across the top and front. The front ridgeline and the center ridgeline both have enough tie outs to distribute the load.
 
jhb8426
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07/16/2017 09:53PM  
quote mastertangler: "...the only thing I have some curiosity about is getting the center ridgeline high enough to be satisfactory..."

I've found that it is best not to have the ridge line higher than you can comfortably reach, and in most cases a bit lower is better yet. Get it too high and the likelihood of rain blowing in goes up. I don't mind ducking a bit under the tarp.
 
mastertangler
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07/17/2017 05:31AM  
Mad Angler I have 2 CCS tarps and can't imagine using anything else. Yes I understand that adding guy lines improves stability. Indeed I like the center ridge line, looks good, especially coupled with the stuff sack. Nifty!

Still curious how that set up does in a big blow. I hate noisy tarps. Just add more lines I guess.

As per ducking underneath........that is fine for 1/3 of my tarp. But I prefer having the other half completely clear. I.e. the side I have my ridgeline established is as high as I can comfortably reach. From that point to beyond my center pole (say 7ft total) I can walk unobstructed. In tight spots this is preferred, at least for me.

I also like the center pole as i make some hooks out of plastic coated wire ties and it becomes "command central" where I can put stuff like sunglasses, bear spray, etc.
 
Mad_Angler
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07/17/2017 02:42PM  
MT. I was talking about the extra loops along the center ridgeline. The center isn;t just supported at the ends. It is supported at 6 or 8 locations along the ridgelines.

The prussiks pull the center pretty tight before adding any guylines. I only used those at the 4 corners. Adding all 6 would help.

I have not rode out a big blow in the center ridgeline setup.

I have rode some very big blows in the front ridgeline setup that you mention. It is nice to have one end low enough to block nearly all the wind. I figured that I would have to lower the side facing the wind if it really started to howl.

But for moderate to high winds, the center ridgeline did much better than I expected. I expected nearly all the rain to come right in. In fact, very little rain came in.
 
07/17/2017 09:35PM  
The beauty of the center ridgeline is that it is easily adjustable to suit the changes in weather. Have the sides high for fair weather and drop a side when the wind and rain set in. Quickly raise and lower the center ridgeline depending on the conditions. Have the ridgeline edges clipped to the ridgeline with a prussic knotted loop or lined to the ground for added protection from wind and rain.
 
07/17/2017 10:13PM  
Unshavenman,

You are right on with your comment about a center ridgeline allowing for easy raising and lowering of the side of the tarp depending on wind direction/intensity.

Pineknot and I were on a Pickerel Lake campsite a couple of weeks ago and a big storm hit us with 40 mph west winds and heavy rain and even hail. Yikes ... it was crazy. But Pineknot is a master at tarpology and rigged his CCS tarp with a center ridgeline with prussics on each end and was able to lower the one end of his tarp just like in your picture and ....voila ... we were able to stay quite dry in that bad storm.

I learned a lot about tarpology from pineknot and with some practice I think I will be able to tie Truckers Hitches and Prussics and with carabiners and Figure 9's ... do a pretty good job at rigging a tarp the right way.

I have ordered a CCS Ridgeline storage bag from Dan Cooke as it makes tarp rigging that much easier.
 
mastertangler
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07/18/2017 08:11AM  
Certainly being able to drop a side all the way down is a huge advantage and quite possibly the aspect which tips the scales in favor of the center ridge line, particularly with groups. I can drop if I want but not quite to that extent since my set up is higher overall (if the ride line is as high as you can reach). Plus the center ridge line can drop 1/2 the tarp where I can effectively drop 1/4........significant advantage favoring the center method.

But If it's blowing and raining sideways I'm in my bag reading or taking a snooze anyway, but I have seen the light and stand corrected. I still think I would prefer my set up, due in large part to not having to duck my head every time I approach from the side.

But during shoulder seasons or with a group of 3 or 4 I would now adopt the center ridge line method. Thank you for educating me (thumbs up).

 
07/18/2017 11:25AM  
MT, I don't know what size tarp you have, but if it's got a 12-14 foot side, you could rig the ridgeline so you have a 6-7 foot wall on one side. You can rig the center ridgeline as high as you want and even with a 1-foot gap at the bottom, you're going to be pretty well protected from blowing rain. Technically, I suppose you could pre-rig it so you could set it up either way.
 
fsupp
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07/18/2017 12:39PM  
For those with rectangular, and not square tarps (say 10x12 or 10x14), do you recommend stringing the center ridgeline along the long or short axis of the tarp?
 
mastertangler
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07/18/2017 01:01PM  
I'm spoiled Boonie.........I go in August when the weather is usually stable and nice. Storms? What's that?

I have a 10x10 and had CCS make me an 8x8 for my August solo trips. Worked fine and dandy for my needs and considerably more compact I might add. Certainly a significant consideration when you have to carry food (and a major amount of fishing equipment :-) for longer trips.

Plus the 8x8 was easy to set up in the smaller campsites that WCPP has to offer.
 
Mad_Angler
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07/18/2017 01:11PM  
unshavenman,
what are the strings attached to each of your loops?
 
07/18/2017 03:06PM  
This is a great thread. I guess I had not thought about this topic as deeply as you guys thought about it.

Thanks for the education.
 
07/18/2017 04:44PM  
quote fsupp: "For those with rectangular, and not square tarps (say 10x12 or 10x14), do you recommend stringing the center ridgeline along the long or short axis of the tarp?"
YMMV, but my 10x14 pictured has the ridgeline running the 14' length of the tarp, not the shorter 10' width.
 
07/18/2017 04:46PM  
I love tarpology!
 
07/18/2017 04:54PM  
quote Mad_Angler: "unshavenman,
what are the strings attached to each of your loops?"

Those are loops for attaching additional lines if necessary. They weren't as useful as I thought they would be and have since come off. I have 20' of CCS cord on each corner as well as attached to the center loops at the front and the back of the tarp. The front and back lines are usually not used and are kept wound up until the wind and rain hit, then they are indispensable. I bought the same tarp in Yellow and had it on a loop through Oyster and LLC a few weeks ago. This pic may show better what I'm talking about.
 
07/18/2017 06:19PM  
quote unshavenman: "quote Mad_Angler: "unshavenman,
what are the strings attached to each of your loops?"

This pic may show better what I'm talking about. "


While I usually set a tarp umbrella style without a ridge or pole, if I use a ridge it's like this, as pictured by unshavenman. Difference for me is that I like Niteize S Biners to clip the mid-tarp loops (saves wear, adds to adjusability), then Prusiks at the border loops. Then just corner ties to anchors with trucker hitches. I do the same with my Lean 1+.

butthead
 
Northwoodsman
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07/18/2017 07:36PM  
What do most of you use for the ridgeline cordage?
 
DanCooke
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07/18/2017 08:02PM  
Another way to change a ridgeline setup is to put the ridgeline at an extreme angle. From high to the ground. Then you can get protection from 3 sides. You switch it up to go then high on both ends if you are going tree to tree.

The 4 panel CCS tarps lend themselves to pitching with a ridgeline in either direction. most 10 x tarps are the market only have pull outs along one center direction. The ridgeline is supported by 7 loops in the length or width of the 10 x x tarps.
 
07/18/2017 08:31PM  
With wHendrix video and all these posts I will certainly have a ridgeline bag in the future :)

T
 
gymcoachdon
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07/18/2017 09:22PM  
quote Northwoodsman: "What do most of you use for the ridgeline cordage?"

I use the stuff Dan sells with the tarp.
1/8" poly rope

I have 50 ft. for the ridgeline, and 25 ft attached to 4 corners and the middle of each side. Total of 200 ft of rope. I have not had any issues with stretching, even when wet. I have the CCS 10x12, 1.1 oz.
 
07/18/2017 09:41PM  
quote unshavenman: "quote fsupp: "For those with rectangular, and not square tarps (say 10x12 or 10x14), do you recommend stringing the center ridgeline along the long or short axis of the tarp?"
YMMV, but my 10x14 pictured has the ridgeline running the 14' length of the tarp, not the shorter 10' width."


Same with mine; I think you get more useable space underneath this way.
 
07/18/2017 09:42PM  
quote gymcoachdon: "quote Northwoodsman: "What do most of you use for the ridgeline cordage?"


I use the stuff Dan sells with the tarp.
1/8" poly rope "


I use the same - it handles well and has low stretch.
 
Northwoodsman
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07/18/2017 09:42PM  
gymcoachdon, Thanks. That's what I use also. I have been practicing my knots every night and I see a lot of thicker ropes in the youtube videos. I know that the CCS Tundra Tarps come with 80' so I got to thinking... if you use 20' at each corner you are out of rope. So what do you use for the ridgeline? Then I think that I answered my own question, a ridgeline isn't necessary, it's optional in many cases.

boonie, I have a 10 x 14 and I would normally run it lengthwise unless I was dropping a side to deflect the wind. It may also depend on your campsite layout, trees, rocks, unusable space, fire grate location, etc. Last trip we re-strung it across the short way so we could drop one side to the ground. It wasn't raining that much but it was in the 40's and 50' and the wind coming off Cherokee was cold!
 
07/18/2017 10:50PM  
Well, Northwoodsman, I know how those cold winds can be, but I can peg that 5-foot wall to the ground and I don't have to raise the other edge much higher to walk under it ;). But . . . YMMV :)
 
fsupp
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07/18/2017 11:37PM  
quote boonie: "quote unshavenman: "quote fsupp: "For those with rectangular, and not square tarps (say 10x12 or 10x14), do you recommend stringing the center ridgeline along the long or short axis of the tarp?"
YMMV, but my 10x14 pictured has the ridgeline running the 14' length of the tarp, not the shorter 10' width."



Same with mine; I think you get more useable space underneath this way."

Thanks to you both.
 
07/19/2017 07:54AM  
I don't have a set way to do my tarp. The weather and camp site features dictate how I will arrange it. Center ridgeline if nice weather, tee-pee style if no trees for ridgeline, steep angle with a diagonal ridgeline if severe wind and rain expected. My daughter calls it "architarpture".
 
gkimball
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07/19/2017 09:03AM  
Another set of pics showing how the ridgeline set up that is so useful when a storm comes. Pictures are from an actual blow I saw coming on a solo this past June and made the adjustment in plenty of time.

I second the 50' of line for the ridgeline idea. Gives maximum ability to place the tarp with due consideration of where wind and rain will come from so you will have a side to drop for protection when needed.

Also including picture of triple tent stake anchor method used to windward side - these have always held where soils are thin.


Ridgeline tarp setup

Tarp adjusted as storm approaches

Triple tent stake anchor on lowered (windward) side
 
Mad_Angler
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07/19/2017 09:39AM  
Another tip...

I love using exposed roots for tying down the low end. The roots are extremely strong and much faster/easier than driving stakes (assuming that you can find a root where you need one)
 
07/19/2017 10:06AM  
quote gkimball: " Triple tent stake anchor on lowered (windward) side"

I do the triple stakes too, however I typically put them in on different planes..... drive the first stake in leaning away from the tent/tarp ~45 degrees, the next two stakes go in perpendicular to the first stake from either side... so its like an X crossing over the first stake. Had some very strong winds our first morning earlier this month and our campsite was basically a sand island. The stakes didn't budge!
 
gkimball
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07/19/2017 06:21PM  
quote mirth: "quote gkimball: " Triple tent stake anchor on lowered (windward) side"


I do the triple stakes too, however I typically put them in on different planes..... drive the first stake in leaning away from the tent/tarp ~45 degrees, the next two stakes go in perpendicular to the first stake from either side... so its like an X crossing over the first stake. Had some very strong winds our first morning earlier this month and our campsite was basically a sand island. The stakes didn't budge!"


Sounds interesting. The 2 stakes going in at an angle might improve performance where the soil is very thin - like most paces when you need it most!
 
jhb8426
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07/29/2017 09:49PM  
quote jhb8426: "quote Mad_Angler: "There was a recent thread about tarp setup. It included a link about the center ridgeline setup.
Center ridgeline "



Hmmm unfortunately Hoop's pics have been disable by photobucket's recent policy change regarding 3rd party hosting. That's too bad as they are very informative."


Digging thru my archives, I've found that I have a PDF file of Hoops original article with pictures. If anyone is interested, contact me via email here and I will send it to you.
 
crewser
 
08/02/2017 03:34PM  
quote jhb8426:

Digging thru my archives, I've found that I have a PDF file of Hoops original article with pictures. If anyone is interested, contact me via email here and I will send it to you."


When I get home I will message from my computer there. My phone won't allow it, and my work computer does not have emails set properly.
 
jhb8426
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08/02/2017 10:22PM  
On it's way, all 7.5 mb of it.
 
08/08/2018 09:52AM  
I got a CCS sack for Christmas last year and have switched my main tarp (a guide gear 12' cat cut) to a continuous ridge line. Looking forward to practicing how to pitch it next week.
 
Mad_Angler
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07/01/2020 09:44AM  
Bump to add to current tarp discussions...
 
07/01/2020 04:35PM  
So far the CCS bag is plenty huge for my tarp that I use for hammocking, same one as from my post before yours. =)
Intentionally pitched before severe weather blew in, the hammock stayed dry.
 
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