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SaganagaJoe
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11/19/2017 09:54AM
I just purchased a pair of Altai Hok Skis - 145 cm. I'm looking forward to getting out with them and will let you all know how I like them.
 
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WildDog
member (20)member
 
11/20/2017 01:23PM
SaganagaJoe, I have 100's of miles on mine (125s) and I love them. They are much slower than a proper BC ski and much faster than a snowshoe and I find myself reaching for these more than either the last couple of years due to their versatility. Enjoy!

SaganagaJoe
distinguished member(2016)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/21/2017 10:17AM
That's very good to hear, WildDog. It was a bit of an expensive outlay for me, but I know that I should be able to find good use for them.
Gadfly
distinguished member (331)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/22/2017 08:39AM
Are these similar to the LL Bean Boreal? I bought a pair of the Boreal a couple years ago and I really like them for crossing lakes and packed trails but have to switch to snowshoes for breaking trail on portages.
SaganagaJoe
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11/22/2017 02:07PM
quote Gadfly: "Are these similar to the LL Bean Boreal? I bought a pair of the Boreal a couple years ago and I really like them for crossing lakes and packed trails but have to switch to snowshoes for breaking trail on portages. "

Looks to be that way. These are apparently good for deep powder too. We'll see.
SaganagaJoe
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11/22/2017 09:58PM
They're here. I'm impressed with the quality all around. I actually ordered the 125s by mistake (my mistake, not the vendor's), but now that I'm looking at them, I think that was a good mistake to make. The 125 will be plenty of ski for me for now and I think they will be more manueverable. I can always order the 145s later on down the road if I like the 125s - $319 isn't a whole lot of money.

Now I just have to get through all these darn finals so I can get out with them. Will post here after my first trip. I'm thinking Mt. Rainier National Park, assuming I can get chains for the van.
MackinawTrout
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
12/08/2017 05:32PM
quote WildDog: "SaganagaJoe, I have 100's of miles on mine (125s) and I love them. They are much slower than a proper BC ski and much faster than a snowshoe and I find myself reaching for these more than either the last couple of years due to their versatility. Enjoy!


"
How are they compared to Backcountry skis in slush?
I have always worried about the permenant mohair skins getting clogged in slush.
I have never used them so I don't know. Anyone who has please chime in.
12/08/2017 10:10PM
I cannot comment on backcountry skis in slush but the hoks are NOT slush resistant. definitely need to carry a scraper of some sort and exercise caution when trying to clear the skinned area.

tg
Trapper7
senior member (58)senior membersenior member
 
12/11/2017 11:30AM
I am 5'11" 220lbs with no skiing experience but a little snowshoeing experience. Relatively good shape for a 39 year old. Would these be good for a beginner? 125 or 145? Thanks for any input.
Pinetree
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12/11/2017 05:15PM
SaganagaJoe: "I just purchased a pair of Altai Hok Skis - 145 cm. I'm looking forward to getting out with them and will let you all know how I like them. "

I assume 145 CM long but how wide we talking.
12/11/2017 05:15PM
I had/have little experience on cc skis and think I get around ok. The more I use them the more efficient I get. I would definitely recommend poles (which i don't always use with snowshoes). I'm 6'3" ~190# and went with the 145s.
wingnut
distinguished member (379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/13/2017 08:19AM
I use my Hoks for recreation and am a beginner also. Like TG, the more I use them the more comfortable I get with them. I really like the skins on the bottom for traction. We are about the same size at 6' 220 and when I looked into buying a pair there was a weight point where they recommended either the 125's or 145's . The 145's being for the heavier people.
SaganagaJoe
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12/17/2017 08:28PM
Pinetree: "SaganagaJoe: "I just purchased a pair of Altai Hok Skis - 145 cm. I'm looking forward to getting out with them and will let you all know how I like them. "

I assume 145 CM long but how wide we talking. "


Width looks to be approx. 6 in or so. Definitely wider than a traditional cross country ski.
Pinetree
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12/17/2017 08:32PM
SaganagaJoe: "Pinetree: "SaganagaJoe: "I just purchased a pair of Altai Hok Skis - 145 cm. I'm looking forward to getting out with them and will let you all know how I like them. "


I assume 145 CM long but how wide we talking. "



Width looks to be approx. 6 in or so. Definitely wider than a traditional cross country ski. "


Be interesting to do a floatation test in deep snow. I found out there is like a minimum length of skis or snowshoes to go along with the width. Maybe these skiis will get maximum floatation.
I have a pair of E109 Fischer skis like 200(80 inches) cm long and 82(3.2inches) mm wide, I like the a lot.
There is not a perfect ski that fits all situations.

The Hok I would think would work great in a wooded area? Be interesting to hear a field report. I know in a short time they have got very popular.
Campcraft
distinguished member (142)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/26/2017 06:58AM
Can any of you that have used them give a personal comparison between the universal binding and the pivot binding?

Mike

WildDog
member (20)member
 
01/04/2018 12:52PM
Great thread guys! Just reading through some of the comments and questions and here are some additional thoughts...

Flotation: In my opinion and experience the flotation is better than BC Skis (Fischer E99, E109 type Ski), not as good as a 56" Alaskan Snowshoe, way better than any aluminum snowshoe. At their best they are like a slow CC ski, at their worst they are like a sliding snowshoe, the benefit is that you do not need to pick your foot up out of the pocket, you just slide your foot forward, she profile of the ski tip is right on the money for this. Similar to an Alaskan but still more efficient in all but the deepest soft snow.

Slush: Way easier than cleaning slush out of all the nooks and crannies of a snowshoe IMO, similar to cleaning a BC ski but maybe better in some ways since in a BC ski the ice can get trapped in the fishscale pattern. Here is a video of my buddy cleaning a HOK with a 6" putty knife Video HERE

Universal vs Universal Pivot: Universal pivot adjusts for bigger feet for one, plus the ski action is a little free'er since it is essentially a hinge under the ball of the foot - I have the pivot, my buddy has the standard, I like the pivot.

For Beginners?: Yes! For anyone new or transitioning from snowshoes to skis, this is a nice stop along the way and a great tool in the arsenal, I own all kinds of snowshoes and skis but find myself grabbing for these more and more, they are just so versatile.

Where to use: We just used them on a 60 mile BWCA crossing, I like them just fine on lakes and on easier portages, they stay on. The shine in somewhat open woods, you can takes these places you would never take a BC ski. They are not so good on stuff that has already been tracked by snowmobile or truck tires etc, they are so wide that you tend to slide left and right since it is so far to engage the metal edge - these are made to be off trail / breaking trail. They DO however follow nice when someone ahead is breaking trail in another pair of HOK, BC skis and to some extent snowshoes.
MackinawTrout
senior member (72)senior membersenior member
 
01/05/2018 02:57PM
WildDog: "Great thread guys! Just reading through some of the comments and questions and here are some additional thoughts...


Flotation: In my opinion and experience the flotation is better than BC Skis (Fischer E99, E109 type Ski), not as good as a 56" Alaskan Snowshoe, way better than any aluminum snowshoe. At their best they are like a slow CC ski, at their worst they are like a sliding snowshoe, the benefit is that you do not need to pick your foot up out of the pocket, you just slide your foot forward, she profile of the ski tip is right on the money for this. Similar to an Alaskan but still more efficient in all but the deepest soft snow.


Slush: Way easier than cleaning slush out of all the nooks and crannies of a snowshoe IMO, similar to cleaning a BC ski but maybe better in some ways since in a BC ski the ice can get trapped in the fishscale pattern. Here is a video of my buddy cleaning a HOK with a 6" putty knife Video HERE


Universal vs Universal Pivot: Universal pivot adjusts for bigger feet for one, plus the ski action is a little free'er since it is essentially a hinge under the ball of the foot - I have the pivot, my buddy has the standard, I like the pivot.


For Beginners?: Yes! For anyone new or transitioning from snowshoes to skis, this is a nice stop along the way and a great tool in the arsenal, I own all kinds of snowshoes and skis but find myself grabbing for these more and more, they are just so versatile.


Where to use: We just used them on a 60 mile BWCA crossing, I like them just fine on lakes and on easier portages, they stay on. The shine in somewhat open woods, you can takes these places you would never take a BC ski. They are not so good on stuff that has already been tracked by snowmobile or truck tires etc, they are so wide that you tend to slide left and right since it is so far to engage the metal edge - these are made to be off trail / breaking trail. They DO however follow nice when someone ahead is breaking trail in another pair of HOK, BC skis and to some extent snowshoes."

Great report!
Thank you.
60 mile crossing? Impressive!!
Is there a trip report?
WildDog
member (20)member
 
01/15/2018 08:54PM
MackinawTrout, that trip report is HERE http://bwca.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=forum.thread&threadId=1056930&forumID=116&confID=1
Pinetree
distinguished member(12489)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/15/2018 09:08PM
WildDog: "MackinawTrout, that trip report is HERE http://bwca.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=forum.thread&threadId=1056930&forumID=116&confID=1"

Here
Sobi
distinguished member (295)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/17/2018 12:29PM
Hello all. Been a bit since I've been back to the site. Pumped to see people are using these. I bought a pair 3 years ago and have used on many adventures. Surprised nobody mentioned the downhill side of these. Being shorter than traditional back country skis you can maneuver well in the woods as you dodge trees and rocks, take jumps, stop, spin and hop. And then the uphill climb is similar to snowshoes. They are probably better for the big powder and space the mountains out west but you can find a smaller version here in Skolville when we get enough snow.

Question for those that have a pair (Hoks I mean). Has anyone retro-fitted with nnn bindings? I've been tempted to give it whirl in hopes of even better control.
01/17/2018 10:19PM
I have not. I have the original universal binding but actually considering trading up to the newer "pivot" binding to accommodate my damn big feet (ok-only a 13 but I'm pretty much stuck in hiking boots-pack boots way too big). If I already had dedicated cc footwear I would probably do whatever was necessary to retrofit the hoks though.

tg
Lailoken
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02/01/2018 01:30PM
Think going to make the plunge here. Going 145 CM, I'm 5'9" 175 - figure if have snowshoes, then bit more length will help on lakes and if too woody on portages/etc., will go to snowshoes.
Lailoken
distinguished member (102)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/02/2018 05:37PM
145 cm sold out cross the country. Just found demo pair of 125 cm and sounds like for BWCA/Quetico, less downhill, more towing, that 125 is perfect.
Pinetree
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02/02/2018 05:46PM
Lailoken: "145 cm sold out cross the country. Just found demo pair of 125 cm and sounds like for BWCA/Quetico, less downhill, more towing, that 125 is perfect.
"

If I winter camp,I would say 90% plus is lake travel.
Lailoken
distinguished member (102)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/09/2018 02:07PM
Like the 125's. Have taken them out for about ten miles of travel, flat to +/- 7% grades on fire roads. Going to get another pair for my son, thinking 145cm to see how they work, don't think that extra 20 cm will be that much, one way or the other.
Lailoken
distinguished member (102)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/23/2018 07:50PM
Just got back from 4 days/3 night trip. Into Stuart Lake. Loved the 125 cm. No one had gone before, so completely trail breaking, but left snowshoes in car and only used the Hoks. I like 125 cm, as could step over small things on trail, like logs easily.
Sobi
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02/26/2018 07:21AM
Do you have any pictures from the trip? I hear Stuart is filled with walleye, curious if you tried for them.

With all the new powder (16" here in little falls this week) the Hok Skis are just giddy!!
Lailoken
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02/27/2018 06:24PM
Lailoken
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02/27/2018 06:26PM
No picture of skis, but one of White Feather Lake that camped on. I did not fish, so no clue on that one, but the portage from river to Stuart looked magical. Planning to try to go this summer to see then.
Sobi
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02/28/2018 06:06AM
Thanks! I love going back to see the locations in the opposite season. We winter camped Burnt in 2008 and then returned last summer for a redemption trip. Pretty cool.
TuscTraveler
member (14)member
 
12/27/2018 11:14AM
Sounds like most people go with the 125 cm size. Has anyone bought / used the 145 cm size?

My initial thought when looking into these was that the 145 might be a bit more efficient (more glide) on lakes and open spaces. Thus since I already have snowshoes I thought it might make more sense to go with the longer skis, curious peoples thoughts. I am 6'1" and 165 lbs so I am not worried about being too heavy for the 125 (another reason I have seen listed for buying the 145).
Pinetree
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12/27/2018 11:29AM
Gor years I use a regular back country ski that was probably in the 60 mm wide area and I got by great. Now have a Fischer 80mm wide by 200 cm long(80inches) and most all arounf conditions I wouldn't want anything wider. Unless your breaking snow all the time and in deep snow.
Many snow conditions and time of year dictates your ski need.
I have skiied as far north as Canadian Agnes on regular back country skiis around 60mm. Little wider and stiffer would of been a little better mid winter. But narrower when going on ice pack etc.

One size doesn't fit all and also depends on how big of load your pulling. I think a much wider and shorter ski would be great in woods travel.
johnMN
senior member (93)senior membersenior member
 
12/30/2018 11:04PM
Just bought Hoks for my wife and myself to add to our winter fun arsenal. Been snowshoeing for many, many years. Gave up our snow machines as we enjoyed the more intimate time walking thru the woods where no one else ventures in the winter. We ordered the 145s with the universal bindings so we can use lighter boots in warmer temps or our mukluks in colder weather. Just got the end of year snow storm (~14") in the Duluth area and are hoping to get out on New Year's day or the upcoming weekend. We lucked into a 25% discount, free shipping, plus 2 - $10 coupons thru LL Bean! Ended up about $485 (before tax) for both pair with the bindings.
johnMN
senior member (93)senior membersenior member
 
01/02/2019 10:51PM
Got out this weekend on our Altai Hoks 145s. They are everything I had hoped they would be in the deep (>20") snow fall we had in the past week. We broke trail and bushwhacked for about 2 hours and these were just a lot of fun. Light weight, glided well, and were so much easier to maneuver in the brush and trees than snow shoes. I've been snowshoeing for over 50 years and love it, but this was a blast! We got the 145s as we do almost all of our adventures in the woods and 90% of the time where no one else has gone before us.
Sobi
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01/03/2019 09:05AM
I love that you can toe drag and lift like a snowshoe. Beats the crap out of a cross country or back country skis when working through brush-tall grass-logs etc. Have you tried the down hill side of them yet? Even a little mid woods slope can get exciting!

How did you work that 25% off? The site tells me these are available for the discount.
TuscTraveler
member (14)member
 
01/03/2019 04:26PM
Thanks John for the review of the 145, I am leaning towards the longer skis but so many people seem to buy the 125 that I was beginning to think that the 145 were not as good for some reason.

Similar to Sobi I am curious how you got 25% off? When I am on the LL Bean site it says these skis are exempt from the discount. Any insight? Thanks.
johnMN
senior member (93)senior membersenior member
 
01/03/2019 04:49PM
Sobi: "I love that you can toe drag and lift like a snowshoe. Beats the crap out of a cross country or back country skis when working through brush-tall grass-logs etc. Have you tried the down hill side of them yet? Even a little mid woods slope can get exciting!
How did you work that 25% off? The site tells me these are available for the discount."


The skis work more with an up and glide on the toe, easier, I think than snowshoes and lighter than the traditional shoes I enjoy using (ya, I'm a wood and leather snob!). No contest going thru the brush. No real downhills - just a couple of short, shallow sloping areas so can't give you anything on the downhill. I do like the metal edges, tho if I ever need them. The 25% was a 3 day deal the week before Christmas that I was blessed to run into literally at the 11th hour on the last day. The site today says these do not currently qualify for the current 25% discount promotion, but it never hurts to call and ask. I've had really good experiences with any of the LL Bean orders and products I've done. https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/114329?feat=pprv&csp=a
johnMN
senior member (93)senior membersenior member
 
01/03/2019 04:55PM
TuscTraveler: "Thanks John for the review of the 145, I am leaning towards the longer skis but so many people seem to buy the 125 that I was beginning to think that the 145 were not as good for some reason.
Similar to Sobi I am curious how you got 25% off? When I am on the LL Bean site it says these skis are exempt from the discount. Any insight? Thanks."


The 25% was a 3 day deal the week before Christmas that I was blessed to run into literally at the 11th hour on the last day. The site today says these do not currently qualify for the current 25% discount promotion, but it never hurts to call and ask. I've had really good experiences with any of the LL Bean orders and products I've done. https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/114329?feat=pprv&csp=a
Pinetree
distinguished member(12489)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/03/2019 07:33PM
With snowshoes or skiis I have experimented with snowshoes and skiis side by side and to get the best floatation you need a certain length and even a minimum width to get good float. That is why some of these modern snowshoes you sink so much. I think you need close to 30 inch length. Skiis nice to have part of the ski at least 3 inches wide. Maybe like 200sq. inches surface area with other criteria included.
Guest Paddler
 
01/03/2019 08:15PM
WildDog: "Great thread guys! Just reading through some of the comments and questions and here are some additional thoughts...


Flotation: In my opinion and experience the flotation is better than BC Skis (Fischer E99, E109 type Ski), not as good as a 56" Alaskan Snowshoe, way better than any aluminum snowshoe. At their best they are like a slow CC ski, at their worst they are like a sliding snowshoe, the benefit is that you do not need to pick your foot up out of the pocket, you just slide your foot forward, she profile of the ski tip is right on the money for this. Similar to an Alaskan but still more efficient in all but the deepest soft snow.


Slush: Way easier than cleaning slush out of all the nooks and crannies of a snowshoe IMO, similar to cleaning a BC ski but maybe better in some ways since in a BC ski the ice can get trapped in the fishscale pattern. Here is a video of my buddy cleaning a HOK with a 6" putty knife Video HERE


Universal vs Universal Pivot: Universal pivot adjusts for bigger feet for one, plus the ski action is a little free'er since it is essentially a hinge under the ball of the foot - I have the pivot, my buddy has the standard, I like the pivot.


For Beginners?: Yes! For anyone new or transitioning from snowshoes to skis, this is a nice stop along the way and a great tool in the arsenal, I own all kinds of snowshoes and skis but find myself grabbing for these more and more, they are just so versatile.


Where to use: We just used them on a 60 mile BWCA crossing, I like them just fine on lakes and on easier portages, they stay on. The shine in somewhat open woods, you can takes these places you would never take a BC ski. They are not so good on stuff that has already been tracked by snowmobile or truck tires etc, they are so wide that you tend to slide left and right since it is so far to engage the metal edge - these are made to be off trail / breaking trail. They DO however follow nice when someone ahead is breaking trail in another pair of HOK, BC skis and to some extent snowshoes."


Wild Dog, can you share with me how you linked that video into your post? Do you know if I could link a video that I posted on my FB page to a post? Thanks.
ArrowheadPaddler
distinguished member(649)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/19/2019 08:34AM
Late to the discussion here, but I own 125 and 145 lengths. For an average sized adult, either works great, but there are some differences. The obvious ones are the 145s float and glide a little better, and the 125s are more maneuverable and perhaps have slightly better kick. One other important difference is the 125s are significantly lighter and easier to carry or pack. This becomes important if you are doing some serious bushwhacking and need to remove the skis from time to time. I think if I was to just have one pair, I would go with the 125, but most people would fine with either, unless you are small.

A couple notes on the standard universal binding. Make sure the buckles are cinched on the outside of your foot, otherwise they will hit each other during your strides. Also, the standard universal binding maxes out at size 12 for most types of winter footwear (I don't have the larger pivot one). Size 13 or other larger boots sometimes can be accommodated by removing the metal pins from the notches and using the tension of the spring to hold the back of the binding in place. Otherwise, you can drill out a couple of additional positions in the plastic band to lock it in place.

I have not tried the NNN backcountry bindings, but I am tempted. Although Hoks have metal edges, with the universal binding they don't engage because the boot/binding combo is not stiff enough. These skis with the universal binding set up are not fun in crusty or icy conditions, they skitter all over the place. The metal edge seems more to function to protect from rocks, etc. with the universal binding. Serious downhill/telemark action needs a much beefier set-up. Downhills are still a lot of fun with universal binding though, and the climbing skins help reduce speed a little and keep you under control if there are lots of trees in the way.

Overall, I am very happy with these. Much more fun and less tiring than snowshoes, more versatile than dedicated BC skis.

In addition to the Altai Hok, there are a couple of other similar skis
Black Diamond Glidelite

Sporten Freewalk

The Black Diamonds don't have a metal edge (I believe) but perhaps are a little lighter than the Hoks.
wingnut
distinguished member (379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/19/2019 09:45AM
Thanks for the link to the Sporten skis AP. First time I've seen them. They look interesting with the tapered rear section. Should be easier to turn with the tails tapered and provide more clearance for people like me that tend to goose step a bit. I didn't see the width for the skis but they do look wider than the Hoks and that probably gives them the floatation needed to make up for the 120 Cm length.
Pinetree
distinguished member(12489)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/19/2019 10:18AM
ArrowheadPaddler it is interesting you talk about sliding around on hard surfaces. I think there a somewhat narrower ski with metal edge would do a better job. I think a back country ski 3-4 inches wide would do much better on lakes and glide better and track much better.
The above ski sounds awesome in deep powder or breaking trail but maybe not on snow like 6 inches deep or hardpack.
Bottom line there is no perfect ski that fits all conditions.
I think big gain in skiis is the track you create for those whom follow.
Guest Paddler
 
01/19/2019 11:31AM
Sobi: "I love that you can toe drag and lift like a snowshoe. Beats the crap out of a cross country or back country skis when working through brush-tall grass-logs etc. Have you tried the down hill side of them yet? Even a little mid woods slope can get exciting!


How did you work that 25% off? The site tells me these are available for the discount."


I called LLBean to order and asked for the 25% discount. They gave it to me without question. Not sure why they are not offering it now.
ArrowheadPaddler
distinguished member(649)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/19/2019 02:33PM
Pinetree: "The above ski sounds awesome in deep powder or breaking trail but maybe not on snow like 6 inches deep or hardpack.
Bottom line there is no perfect ski that fits all conditions.
I think big gain in skiis is the track you create for those whom follow."


I agree Pinetree. If the snow isn't deep or once a track is set, these things start to lose some of their advantage. I still go for my narrow Madshus Glittertinds for March crust skiing or kick and glide touring on set-up or shallow snow. With the Hoks though, I still really like the fact you don't need a special boot. They have been nice for my kids or friends who don't have skis to just strap on and go.
TuscTraveler
member (14)member
 
03/15/2019 11:19AM
Just wanted to follow up the 125 vs 145 discussion here. After talking with the actual manufacturer of these skis and a few outfitters that rent them in Cook County I decided to buy the 145, everyone recommended this size given I was taller 6'1" and 175 lbs and the fact that I would be using them on backcountry lakes where ideally I would want a bit more glide and float.

I just took these skis on a 40+ mile trip from Moose to Saganaga and overall I was very happy with the performance. I feel like the best summary would be "Slow Ski & Fast Snowshoe" that I have heard from others. They did a great job helping me break trail when necessary and float on top of snow when possible. Also given I was pulling a 65 lb pulk I feel like these were solid as I had plenty of grip.

My brother was using old-school bushwhacker skis that were also around 145 cm and honestly he was moving faster than me, especially when we were on firmer surfaces. That said I do not know how much I read into this as he just finished in the top 25 of the 2019 Birkie! (I am just a recreational skier)

In general if you want to ski on trails or packed snow, these skis are not worth it. If you want to ski in untracked back-country areas these are a solid option and I liked the 145 length. I did not think they were too heavy, I had zero issues with them being too slippery on firm surfaces (heard others report this), and I loved the universal bindings. Happy skiing all!

Pinetree
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03/15/2019 12:06PM
Great report and love all the photos. I love skiing the border route in the winter. Like I said a longer ski if the snow is half packed works great.
You two look in awesome shape and Congrat to your brother.
A friend of mine took first in the over 40 Classic at the Birkie this year. His first name is Owen.

Years ago we were winter camping on Man Chain in Canada. Two individuals from Ely skiied all the way to the Man Chain. Fished a little bit and skiied out. They pretty much skate skiied.

Me I just blug along.
johnMN
senior member (93)senior membersenior member
 
03/15/2019 07:44PM
Got out last week on a gorgeous day. Deepest snow I've skied in this winter ~30". The 145s I got were great in the backcountry. Even with the 145s I was sinking up to 12" in the protected areas where there was deep powder and the wind had not gotten to it and packed it down. Started the day at -3 and ended about 5 hours later at +17 with almost no wind. With all the rain and melting we got in the past couple of days, I know I won't see another day that was so fantastic to be in the woods.
Pinetree
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03/15/2019 08:54PM
johnMN: "Got out last week on a gorgeous day. Deepest snow I've skied in this winter ~30". The 145s I got were great in the backcountry. Even with the 145s I was sinking up to 12" in the protected areas where there was deep powder and the wind had not gotten to it and packed it down. Started the day at -3 and ended about 5 hours later at +17 with almost no wind. With all the rain and melting we got in the past couple of days, I know I won't see another day that was so fantastic to be in the woods."

You know I think in fluffy snow or normal snow whatever length widt ski-snowshoe you have to pack that top layer of snow so ithas density and structure to hold you.often it seems like 12 inches or so.
bigmitch1
member (43)member
 
03/18/2019 07:33PM
IMO, the Hok 145s are the perfect all-around ski for the BWCA.

Check out my post under the query “Do snowshoes work?” in which I did a side by side comparison of the Rossignol BC 125 at 175 cm v. OAR XCD GT 160s v. Altai Hok 145 on a groomed trail.

With a quiver to choose from, I always pick the Hok 145s.

They are the slowest of the three on hardpack, but they work well everywhere without requiring climbing skin transitions.

 
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