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Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Winter Camping and Activities
      Hot Tents and stove suggestions     

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Lailoken
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02/24/2019 03:51PM
Hei, did a few cold tenting winter campings, and fine with, except last one was solo, and realized at -16F/-27 C that you can't really read or write in evening as if you quit moving, you need to really be in mummy bag. I think with that, looking for good solo hot tent and stove. Any strong recommenations for both and combos?
 
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Arcola
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02/24/2019 07:33PM
Kni-co is a good stove company at what I'd call a fair price.

As for tents, Snowtrekker tents are the Gold standard, but there are many ways to get started. tents
stoves
Lailoken
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02/25/2019 12:27PM
Thank you!
Soledad
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02/26/2019 11:34AM
Go to the Winter Camping Symposium to learn all about winter camping, and to check out how many others find a way to read books out of doors in the winter :)
Lailoken
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02/26/2019 07:13PM
Thanks. Doing cold tent this weekend 4 days & 3 nights. -17 F is forecast for Sunday, so if like that, 100% going in for tent.
SteveElms73
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02/27/2019 09:05AM
It really is nice to have a warm place to hang out in when it dips down in the evenings. I'll bring my hot tent if the temps are looking anything below around -15C. Anything warmer and I'm content with an outside fire and retiring to the sleeping bag when I get cold. But at -15 or lower it's great to crawl into that tent. We were in Algonquin a couple weeks back and it was -27C outside and over 30C inside the tent (that was too warm so we had to vent it). We were inside in shorts and a t shirt happily cooking our bacon on the Kni-Co stove :)

One thing to keep in mind with the hot tent is that unless you plan on waking up every 2 hours to add wood, the stove will probably burn down and your tent will be down to ambient temps within a couple of hours. When I first got my hot tent and stove I imagined loading it up with wood right before I went to sleep and having it ooze heat all night...
Lailoken
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02/27/2019 09:49AM
Yes, this weekend, -27 C is low, and I don't mind cold during day, but don't like waking sucking in cold air. I think waking and adding wood sounds fine.
bigmitch1
member (43)member
 
02/27/2019 03:16PM
I bring my winter mountaineering cook tent (Black Diamond Megalight) and extra fuel to heat up the interior during dinner and breakfast.

I make a depression on one side of the tent interior for my sleeping system and dig out the other side for a bench to sit on.

Lightweight and does the job.

Jaywalker
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02/28/2019 07:57PM
To echo Arcola, Snowtrekker is the gold standard. For what you've stated as your needs, I'd suggest a Crew or Shortwall 8x10with the Kni-co small. The Snowtrekker stove set up is custom with great snow-float legs and side table - a great set up. A hot tent really is a game changer for winter camping. It's like a mobile cabin. Being able to warm up and dry out completely twice a day really enables you to push into the cold and have fun.

While I'm a fan of (and owner) of Snowtrekker, there are also other options. There's a Canadian tent maker called Atuk that are pretty popular up there. Worth a look. Some military surplus tents are a steal, and some do a great job converting canvas tents into hot tents for a very reasonable price. Finally, there are synthetic hot tents that can dramatically cut pack size and weight, like from Seek Outside or CCS. I don't know as much about them, but always admire the potential weight savings.
03/02/2019 10:33AM
At the Winter Camping Symposium, you see all sorts and varieties of tents, but everyone drools over the Snowtrekker's , especially the Atuk owners.
whitecedar
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03/05/2019 07:59AM
Please consider all the available hot tents. In the past few years there are a number of companies who are pushing the hot tent design envelope. A wide variety of materials are being used. Each system has strengths and weaknesses. Consider how you envision using your new hot tent, moving every day for long distances or base camping would be a reasonable question to ask. As mentioned the Winter Camping Symposium is a great place to see a wide variety of winter shelters, I especially gravitate towards the do it yourself group as they are always designing/building or re-purposing.
Lailoken
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03/05/2019 11:06AM
Thanks. I want to move as quickly as possible and want place to keep it at least about -18C/0F at night with some heat from stove, as -27C/-17F this last weekend took a bit to endure. Also, nice to be able to cook and have food not immediately freeze!
03/05/2019 02:13PM
Lailoken: "Thanks. I want to move as quickly as possible and want place to keep it at least about -18C/0F at night with some heat from stove, as -27C/-17F this last weekend took a bit to endure. Also, nice to be able to cook and have food not immediately freeze!"

Hot tenting is living in the lap of luxury. Nothing beats a quiet evening lounging near the flickering stove in a toasty hot tent.
Lailoken
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03/08/2019 07:38PM
https://springbarcanvas.com/products/winnerwell-nomad-medium-tent-stove?dfw_tracker=42078-12511503876199&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=dynamicremarketing&utm_term=viewproduct&utm_content=woodburning&fbclid=IwAR2qKQiCmrusfIXRtA9gWikpn_QziNZJUlikK6ipATGM1F5CyyUzYOckBfo

Does any stove work with any tent? I see these diagonal flues and not sure.
Arcola
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03/08/2019 09:16PM
Yes and no. Any stove will work, but may not be large enough to heat the area, also the stove pipe hole in the tent should match the stove pipe. The stove link you posted shows a 2.5" pipe. At that size you'll be making the gasket yourself. Many tents will have 4,5" stove hole. Thee other issue with the stove you posted could be weight v.s. fire box size. Seems 20lbs for such a small stove is heavy, but to each their own.
Jaywalker
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03/09/2019 08:06AM
I've seen a few tents where the stove pipe hole in the gasket is elliptical vs round. It has to do with whether the tent maker expects the pip to exit the tent at a 90ยบ angle or lesser angle. Just have to make sure the stove pipe fits the hole or you may have to modify it.

I've seen that stove online but never up close, nor have I talked to anyone who has one. A window on a stove would be awesome in my opinion, but I'd be a bit cautious of an 8 x 8 firebox. Seems better suited to fending off a chill in shoulder season rather than beating back serious cold in winter - just my opinion. And at 20 lbs, its heavier than a Kni-co, has less heating capacity than Kni-co, and cost more too.
 
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