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      Cooperative effort for dark skies initiative     
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PuffinGin
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09/09/2019 07:26PM
Folks in Superior National Forest and Quetico are involved in a cooperative venture to collect needed data for International dark sky initiative.

International Dark Skies Quetico & Boundary Waters
 
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Minnesotian
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09/11/2019 10:28AM

This is very cool. Thanks for the link.
 
x2jmorris
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09/11/2019 11:25AM
I don't really get what this is. Trying to get recognized as a dark sky? Cool pictures and I guess cool designation though it will bring even more people now lol.
 
arctic
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09/11/2019 11:46AM
Pristine skies, free from light pollution, are nearly gone from east of the Mississippi River, and are rapidly disappearing from the West as well.

Studies have shown that a large metro area can brighten the sky out to a radius of 300km (>180 miles), and every little town, "security" light, street light, etc brightens the sky.

Few American have seen a truly dark sky because nearly every Midwestern, Southern, and Eastern state has no such places left. Even in the West you need to be FAR from a city to find it.

The border country of NE Minnesota and adjacent parts of NE Minnesota, as well as the Red Lake area, still have pristine skies. On the map below, only BLACK is pristine...

Dark Skies in the Lower 48 States
 
x2jmorris
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09/11/2019 01:13PM
arctic: "Pristine skies, free from light pollution, are nearly gone from east of the Mississippi River, and are rapidly disappearing from the West as well.


Studies have shown that a large metro area can brighten the sky out to a radius of 300km (>180 miles), and every little town, "security" light, street light, etc brightens the sky.


Few American have seen a truly dark sky because nearly every Midwestern, Southern, and Eastern state has no such places left. Even in the West you need to be FAR from a city to find it.


The border country of NE Minnesota and adjacent parts of NE Minnesota, as well as the Red Lake area, still have pristine skies. On the map below, only BLACK is pristine...

Dark Skies in the Lower 48 States "


That is a pretty cool map. Crazy to think about that. I guess I have taken it for granted.
 
Pinetree
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09/11/2019 03:54PM
A person doesn't realize what they can't see around home sometimes. The BWCA or like Montana it amazes me how many stars-planets are out there. There is life out there somewhere. The universe or even beyond is sooo big. Kirk and Dr. Spock know.

I always wished I had a astronomy class. Sometimes we know so little about so much.
 
DanCooke
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09/11/2019 04:23PM
Been to several dark sky places. It is amazing the differences of how many and the intensity of the stars from the burbs. Leaving shortly for another location of dark sky.
 
Bearpath9
member (47)member
 
09/11/2019 05:27PM
Now, that's a cool map. Since my mom lives in Wyoming, I have been to a couple of those places out there. Never really thought about it, I just know that I see more stars when I'm at her place. The map gives it some perspective.
 
09/11/2019 05:30PM
Even in Canada it helps to be a couple hundred of miles north of the border to get really clear skies.
 
Basspro69
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09/11/2019 06:31PM
Awesome
 
09/11/2019 06:50PM
I notice one of the places on that map is Big Bend National Park on the Rio Grande near Terlingua, TX. This is a pic (with admittedly an extended time exposure) of my tent on a campsite on the Rio Grande:

The stars were amazing.
 
09/12/2019 06:37AM
OneMatch: "I notice one of the places on that map is Big Bend National Park on the Rio Grande near Terlingua, TX. This is a pic (with admittedly an extended time exposure) of my tent on a campsite on the Rio Grande:


The stars were amazing."


Very nice!
 
ZaraSp00k
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09/12/2019 07:38AM
Look at Lost Wages, Chicago, and LA, that’s disgusting. Maybe more disgusting is that you can see Grand Marais & Ely, and worse yet, Tofte & Lutsen.
 
09/12/2019 11:02AM
I've been an amateur astronomer for over 40 years, living in N. Illinois. On a trip to Big Bend National Park, the skies were so dark and the stars so numerous that I had trouble identifying the constellations.
 
arctic
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09/12/2019 11:45AM
awbrown: "I've been an amateur astronomer for over 40 years, living in N. Illinois. On a trip to Big Bend National Park, the skies were so dark and the stars so numerous that I had trouble identifying the constellations."

Me too. The best skies I have seen were in Yellowstone, the BWCA/Quetico, and northern Ontario/Manitoba.
 
Pinetree
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09/12/2019 12:38PM
awbrown: "I've been an amateur astronomer for over 40 years, living in N. Illinois. On a trip to Big Bend National Park, the skies were so dark and the stars so numerous that I had trouble identifying the constellations."

You really don't realize the number and magnitude of stars until you go to a dark place and also less pollution in the air beside light pollution.
 
Minnesotian
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09/12/2019 01:34PM
awbrown: "I've been an amateur astronomer for over 40 years, living in N. Illinois. On a trip to Big Bend National Park, the skies were so dark and the stars so numerous that I had trouble identifying the constellations."

I grew up in western Minnesota and got to know the stars and the patterns very well. Same thing happened to me as you, when I was in Quetico the stars were so thick I felt momentarily lost looking for some of those same familiar constellations.
 
SaganagaJoe
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09/14/2019 11:12AM
arctic: "awbrown: "I've been an amateur astronomer for over 40 years, living in N. Illinois. On a trip to Big Bend National Park, the skies were so dark and the stars so numerous that I had trouble identifying the constellations."


Me too. The best skies I have seen were in Yellowstone, the BWCA/Quetico, and northern Ontario/Manitoba. "


Western Olympic National Park and thereabouts, near the Pacific Coast, is pretty awesome. I slept under the stars on two occasions when hunting out there (not in the park of course) and will never forget it.
 
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