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MinnesotaJenny
member (20)member
 
11/15/2019 05:47AM
This is embarrassing, but I’m desperate: I grew up in the Chicago suburbs and have not learned to fish. No one in my family is outdoorsy. I’ve gone with a few people, but they turned out to be impatient and didn’t explain what we were doing or how. I’ve gone countless times myself, yet never caught anything.

Any ideas who does this? Patient people who teach adults? I love to learn new things and ask many questions. I have a couple fishing poles, but don’t know what kind of fish they are for. Thanks
 
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11/15/2019 07:20AM
From one non-fisher to another - welcome! Don't be embarrassed; be fear-free and excited about the sport! My tips for learning how to approach it:

1. Keep it simple (just like bread-baking). It gets real complicated, real quickly. That sells more product.

2. Find (hire) a patient guide. If you're too shy to do that (me), watch youtube videos then try it yourself.

3. If you're into clubs and social fishing, but would feel more comfortable in the company of women, there is a very active group of fishers in MN focused on getting women into the sport. Wisconsin has a similar, active, very supportive group. I'm too shy for this, but maybe it's your thing:
Women Anglers of MN

4. Finally, a "no-fish" day means that they're not biting what you're offering. Or, they'd like to eat what you're offering, but they're not in the location where you're offering it. Pretty simple (except it's not, which is why it's a sport :)

If you want more specifics, you can pm me and I can pass along books, websites and some helpful tips about my little tackle set-up. I learned to fish from a man who died a few years ago, so I can't pass along my guide contact, unfortunately. But having a guide to show me how to fish, specifically how to fish backcountry with artificial lures from a canoe, was a game-changer.

Have fun!
~jp

 
AmarilloJim
distinguished member(1867)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/15/2019 08:05AM
When and where do you want to fish?
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(12832)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
11/15/2019 09:03AM
If you are asking about fishing in the BWCA, I can help. On your next trip, you will want a container of leeches. Start out with a slip bobber, then a bobber stop, then a split shot weight, then a plain hook with the leech on it.

Set your bobber stop so the bobber floats and the hook is about a foot off the bottom. Cast it out from shore or out in the canoe and wait until the bobber goes down. Set the hook. This setup is very cheap to buy and works great.

Or you can paddle around slowly with a Rapala in about 12- 18 feet of water. You will catch smallmouth bass, walleye, and northern pike with both of these setups.

 
missmolly
distinguished member(6176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
11/15/2019 09:20AM
There was a great guy named Jim who used to post on this site. His handle was TGO and he advocated a method of fishing called the TGO method that I use to powerful effect. I simply use a small hook, about a size four, with a split shot sinker about a foot to two feet above it. Hook a leech through the sucker. They leech might stick to you, but it won't suck your blood. Then pull out some line until you hit bottom and then reel a couple turns. When your rod tip twitches, set the hook and have fun! Where I fish, in the Crown Land of Canada, you can catch a hundred bass, walleye, and pike a day doing this. That's a good day, of course, but a slow day is still thirty fish.

This method is similar to Savage Voyageur's, but without the bobber.

For me, the key to catching fish is fishing where folks don't fish. The fish run big and dumb and tons of fun!
 
moustachesteve
 
11/15/2019 10:03AM
Hi - first time, long time here so hopefully I don't screw up the links. Assuming you're in Minnesota, the DNR offers classes and get-togethers for all sorts of outdoors things including fishing. These are geared toward women, children, and families. Classes and events range from very basic (and free) to mentoring to guided trips.

Here's a calendar for 2019 but you should soon be able to find the same on the MN DNR website for 2020. Good luck!

Educational Options

2019 Class and Event Catalog
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
11/15/2019 12:29PM
Savage Voyageur: "If you are asking about fishing in the BWCA, I can help. On your next trip, you will want a container of leeches. Start out with a slip bobber, then a bobber stop, then a split shot weight, then a plain hook with the leech on it.

Set your bobber stop so the bobber floats and the hook is about a foot off the bottom. Cast it out from shore or out in the canoe and wait until the bobber goes down. Set the hook. This setup is very cheap to buy and works great. "


Agree 100% with SV. Hard to beat a slip bobber rig with a leech, especially for catching walleyes. Here's a drawing of the rig set up.
 
missmolly
distinguished member(6176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
11/15/2019 12:34PM
Jackfish: "Savage Voyageur: "If you are asking about fishing in the BWCA, I can help. On your next trip, you will want a container of leeches. Start out with a slip bobber, then a bobber stop, then a split shot weight, then a plain hook with the leech on it.


Set your bobber stop so the bobber floats and the hook is about a foot off the bottom. Cast it out from shore or out in the canoe and wait until the bobber goes down. Set the hook. This setup is very cheap to buy and works great. "


Agree 100% with SV. Hard to beat a slip bobber rig with a leech, especially for catching walleyes. Here's a drawing of the rig set up.
"


Pete, I'll use a bobber if I want to drift a leech through current for walleye, but otherwise, why bother?
 
treehorn
distinguished member (462)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/15/2019 02:38PM
Savage Voyageur: "Set your bobber stop so the bobber floats and the hook is about a foot off the bottom. "
Just so you guys know, (I see Miss Molly mentioned this as well)....this is the kind of thing that confuses the heck out of a new angler.

You can't tell someone to fish a foot from the bottom without informing them how to figure out where the bottom is. This is when they get frustrated and quit.

It might be hard for you to imagine yourselves being that "green," so it's hard to relate. But a newbie angler staring at some water with the words "fish one foot from the bottom" swirling in her head, is not a great recipe for getting her hooked on the sport (pun intended).

I know that in brief message posts you can't cover every bit of fishing knowledge you have. So I wouldn't expect you to drop an essay on finding the depth of a lake in your post, but I just know that specific piece of advice can be pretty intimidating.

I also know it's good advice, so maybe she'll follow up and learn more about it. But I've seen lots of people try slip bobber fishing, then completely lose patience (probably because their bait wasn't at the right depth), then just start throwing lures because it's simpler.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(12832)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
11/15/2019 02:57PM
To find the bottom is very simple. You just put the slip bobber into the water. If it stands upright, it is not on the bottom. If the bobber lays down flat, it is on the bottom. Move the slip bobber adjustable knot up or down until it is a foot off the bottom. You can speed up this process by attaching a temporary clip on heavier weight.

As to your last point, slip bobber fishing, in my opinion, is the easiest way to catch fish, especially for a new person to the sport. This is the way most kids learn to fish, it’s that easy.

One more point is a lighted slip bobber for night fishing. It’s so fun to sit by the fire or shoreline and watch your bobber go down.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(12832)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
11/15/2019 03:06PM
missmolly: "Jackfish: "Savage Voyageur: "If you are asking about fishing in the BWCA, I can help. On your next trip, you will want a container of leeches. Start out with a slip bobber, then a bobber stop, then a split shot weight, then a plain hook with the leech on it.



Set your bobber stop so the bobber floats and the hook is about a foot off the bottom. Cast it out from shore or out in the canoe and wait until the bobber goes down. Set the hook. This setup is very cheap to buy and works great. "


Agree 100% with SV. Hard to beat a slip bobber rig with a leech, especially for catching walleyes. Here's a drawing of the rig set up.
"



Pete, I'll use a bobber if I want to drift a leech through current for walleye, but otherwise, why bother? "



Why bother? Because with a slip bobber you can get the bait exactly where the walleye are, one foot above the bottom. But the most important job a slip bobber does is as a strike indicator. Bobber goes down you know 100% that there is a fish on the other end. Without a slip bobber the walleye can mouth a leech, spit it out of his mouth and swim away. You had no idea he was even there. With a slip bobber on, the bobber goes down and you can set the hook before the fish decides to spit it out. Your walleye mortality rate will better because most of your fish will be hooked in the lips or front of the mouth as opposed to the stomach.
 
missmolly
distinguished member(6176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
11/15/2019 05:31PM
Savage Voyageur: "missmolly: "Jackfish: "Savage Voyageur: "If you are asking about fishing in the BWCA, I can help. On your next trip, you will want a container of leeches. Start out with a slip bobber, then a bobber stop, then a split shot weight, then a plain hook with the leech on it.



Set your bobber stop so the bobber floats and the hook is about a foot off the bottom. Cast it out from shore or out in the canoe and wait until the bobber goes down. Set the hook. This setup is very cheap to buy and works great. "


Agree 100% with SV. Hard to beat a slip bobber rig with a leech, especially for catching walleyes. Here's a drawing of the rig set up.
"




Pete, I'll use a bobber if I want to drift a leech through current for walleye, but otherwise, why bother? "




Why bother? Because with a slip bobber you can get the bait exactly where the walleye are, one foot above the bottom. But the most important job a slip bobber does is as a strike indicator. Bobber goes down you know 100% that there is a fish on the other end. Without a slip bobber the walleye can mouth a leech, spit it out of his mouth and swim away. You had no idea he was even there. With a slip bobber on, the bobber goes down and you can set the hook before the fish decides to spit it out. Your walleye mortality rate will better because most of your fish will be hooked in the lips or front of the mouth as opposed to the stomach. "


I can see and feel a strike with my rod tip. My concern is that I'm taking the time to attach more terminal tackle instead of catching fish.
 
thegildedgopher
distinguished member (414)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/15/2019 08:09PM
I can’t add much to the convo because the advice given already is really solid, no need to repeat. I think both TGO or slip bobber method are great places to start. Learning to tie knots and do some rigging will help. I like the bobber because a lot of folks don’t have a rod that’s sensitive enough to really feel a subtle bite.

The other method that’s incredibly simple when starting is trolling. No fancy rigging required. Tie a snap swivel to the end of your line and change lures using the snap. Some lures dive just a foot or two, some dive 30 feet. Get a selection of floating rapala, jointed rapala, husky jerk, shad rap, and tail dancers. Other brands/lures are great too, just keeping it simple by using Rapala which are sold almost everywhere. Tie on your chosen lure, open your bail and start paddling. Let out approx 100-150 feet of line, close your bail, and keep paddling. The more line you let out, the deeper your lure will run. Speed also affects lure depth — faster equals shallower. Trolling is great because you gotta paddle anyway. May as well make your paddling produce dinner. Once you get going you will feel/see the steady wobble of the lure on your rod tip. If you feel the tip going from wobbly to dead it means the lure has likely picked up weeds and needs to be cleaned. If your rod tip starts consistently bending but it doesn’t feel like a fish, your lure is smashing into the lake bottom. This can actually work great when targeting walleye, but can also lead to snags. Simply reel in about 10 feet of line and let it run until your lure stops banging bottom. When you hook a fish it will be obvious, and the great part about trolling is you don’t need to “set” the hook, the fish basically hook themselves.

Finally — I have been trying to become a fisherman for 30 years or so and still feel like I know doodly-squat. This is what fishing is all about to me, being constantly reminded that I’m playing by nature’s rules and that I stink at this game! But where else can you go into nature and hold powerful, living creatures in your own hands? Worth it!
 
lindylair
distinguished member(2139)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/15/2019 10:16PM
Trolling works, no doubt about it. Once you get the basics you can troll for long periods of time without hindering paddling, which you are doing anyways - why not see if the fish are biting?

The TGO method is great as well, especially on the water and will produce fish if you are in the right area. But slip bobbers are a no brainer, on the water but even moreso from your campsite. i have caught many many nice fish on a slip bobber thrown out from the campsite while actively fishing...or not. With a slip bobber in the water you can read a good book, cook dinner, tidy up camp or just sit and contemplate life in the BWCA - just remember to take a peak at the bobber every so often.

I am partial to vertical jigging. This works particularly well for walleyes and smallmouth bass and is typically done in 10-25 feet of water...start in 12-18 feet. Tie a jig on the end of your line and tip it with a leech, crawler or minnow. Drop it down to the bottom (when the line goes slack) and then bring it up about a foot or so. Occasionally lift your rod tip and let the jig drop back down, this is often when a fish will hit. If you feel the bite set the hook. It works well and is really simple. The trick with this...and most types of fishing is finding a spot where the fish are likely to be.

There is plenty of info out there as to where fish hang out...depth, weeds, rocks or bottom structure, dropoffs or bays...try something that looks good and if that doesn't work try something else. You will find them.
 
missmolly
distinguished member(6176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
11/16/2019 09:10AM
Like the gildedgopher, I also know doodly-squat. Fishing can humble you, so it's best to find some humility going into it. Speaking of humble, you might begin with sunfish, like bluegills and pumpkinseed. They're fun, willing, tasty, and scrappy. Use a tiny hook, a split shot and bobber, and just enough worm to hide the tip of the hook. Then watch that bobber bob and the little bait stealers come to play!
 
Zwater
distinguished member (466)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/16/2019 01:51PM
missmolly: "There was a great guy named Jim who used to post on this site. His handle was TGO and he advocated a method of fishing called the TGO method that I use to powerful effect. I simply use a small hook, about a size four, with a split shot sinker about a foot to two feet above it. Hook a leech through the sucker. They leech might stick to you, but it won't suck your blood. Then pull out some line until you hit bottom and then reel a couple turns. When your rod tip twitches, set the hook and have fun! Where I fish, in the Crown Land of Canada, you can catch a hundred bass, walleye, and pike a day doing this. That's a good day, of course, but a slow day is still thirty fish.


This method is similar to Savage Voyageur's, but without the bobber.


For me, the key to catching fish is fishing where folks don't fish. The fish run big and dumb and tons of fun!"


I agree. Just jig a leech off the bottom. Plain and simple.
 
yogi59weedr
distinguished member(2037)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/16/2019 08:29PM
Buy a $40,000 bass boat. $40,000 truck to pull it with. Dress your self up in the best fishing attire. It might not help you catch more fish but will reel in the dates.
Just kidding.
Putting yourself in fish catching places will help.
 
SlowElk
member (49)member
 
11/16/2019 08:51PM
I would say try to learn as much as you can from as many people as you can. Good luck and have fun!

 
gqualls
distinguished member (168)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/16/2019 08:59PM
Good advice from everyone. A couple of things to consider ……….

Practice casting in your back yard. Set up some targets to throw at -- 10-15-20 yards away if you have the room. Get proficient at casting.

Learn to tie a good knot.

There are several threads on this forum about favorite lures in the BWCA. You could probably pick 4-5 from the favorites list and be good to go. If you are unsure about how to fish a lure look it up online.

Have fun, and good luck!
 
Gunwhale
 
11/16/2019 09:55PM
Becoming an Outdoors Woman, Minnesota DNR. Program especially for women, often taught by women.
 
SlowElk
member (49)member
 
11/16/2019 10:26PM
gqualls: "Good advice from everyone. A couple of things to consider ……….

Practice casting in your back yard. Set up some targets to throw at -- 10-15-20 yards away if you have the room. Get proficient at casting.

Have fun, and good luck!"


Might be the best tip yet. Any guide will certainly appreciate your efforts.
 
11/17/2019 04:30PM
MinnesotaJenny,

I would say that you can save a lot of time and learn quickly if you can find someone to show you what to do (of course as you mentioned just because someone can do something doesn't mean they can teach someone else)

I had a neighbor show me how to catch stocked rainbows. Little things can make a difference (lb test of line, size of fish hook etc). Ask the average fisherman on opening day and they will say something like "use power bait". That is not helpful if you don't know how to create a rig with light enough line and a small enough hook that will float the power bait about three feet off the bottom.

If you cannot find someone like a neighbor or co-worker, then another option is to hire a guide.

If you prefer to read a book, I recommend "Lunkers Love Nightcrawlers". I have read this book. My son has read it. I lent it to my co-worker who has become my fishing buddy.

Of course now we have the internet. I learned how to tie a slip bobber rig by watching youtube. Seeing a diagram is one thing. Watching someone tie the rigs is even better.

catfish edge slip bobber

knetters outdoors

angling buzz

There is also a lot of jargon. This is a good intro (for example what is the difference between mono and fluoro?) that is part of a series about fishing in audio format.

fishing basics

fishing series

Finally, I would suggest picking a species first (say walleye or small mouth bass) and then learning how to catch that one species by going some place where you know the species will be. For example, if there is a lake that you know is stocked with small mouth, go there and target small mouth.


 
overthehill
distinguished member(4408)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
11/17/2019 08:01PM
All good advice! Sometimes it helps to be in a quiet reverent mood or mode. I like to keep it simple and have always taken crawlers. I like the
lunkers love nightcrawlers way as well as the TGO Methed. (do a site search for many threads here. )
Throw it out,feed some line; let it drop awhile; then reel in VERY slowly. Rinse and repeat. Give it a few minutes, then move. A dock is a good place to start. If there are fish there, they should bite. Have faith. Keep it simple.
 
11/17/2019 09:48PM
overthehill: " All good advice! Sometimes it helps to be in a quiet reverent mood or mode. I like to keep it simple and have always taken crawlers. I like the
lunkers love nightcrawlers way as well as the TGO Methed. (do a site search for many threads here. )
Throw it out,feed some line; let it drop awhile; then reel in VERY slowly. Rinse and repeat. Give it a few minutes, then move. A dock is a good place to start. If there are fish there, they should bite. Have faith. Keep it simple."


Truest words spoken. If you're in a lake with stocked rainbow trout, that's a certain set-up. If you're in a lake with lake trout, that's another (and time of year, water temp). If it's a stream, that's a certain set-up. If it's a lake, that's another. If it's in the Canadian Shield, that's another. Know the fish, know the habitat, and know the conditions. It all goes back to what Amarillo Jim asked, "when and where" and I'd add "what species"?
 
AmarilloJim
distinguished member(1867)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/18/2019 07:41AM
An old rule, 90% of the fish are located within 10% of an area of water. This location changes seasonally and for different species. Location of bait and spawning needs are the primary driving forces. These factors dictate what techniques I use. Up North, on unfamiliar lakes and without mapping, I tend to troll a lot. I fish for walleye and LT primarily. In Spring I rarely fish deeper than 15'. In Fall I'm usually deeper than 40'.
 
Bearpath9
senior member (78)senior membersenior member
 
11/18/2019 09:09AM
Don't know your location, but I will add this. Grab your pole (s), go to a bait store, or any store with a "live bait" sign, and get a dozen crawlers. Bring a cooler, for beverages and to keep the crawlers cold. Locate a fishing dock, or pier. Most lakes in my area (twin cities) have them. Or ask the clerk where you buy your bait where there is one. If you are lucky, somebody will be fishing. If they seem friendly, ask them to lend you a hand. I am assuming that your rig has a leader, with a split shot just above where it ties onto the line, and a bare hook at the end. A jig will also work. Take a crawler and thread it onto the hook. I usually cut them in half. Let out line until you have about 5 foot of slack, and put on a bobber. Just the round kind. Then either cast (you have been practicing that, as someone else suggested) or drop it over the edge of the pier. You won't catch a big one, but there should be plenty of little ones, and that is what you want at this stage. Catch one, release it, and repeat. Corn kernels from a can also will work. This is the method I used with my grandson when he was 4 or 5, and now he is ready to go any time I ask him (he's 14 now).Good luck, and just be patient.
 
Bearpath9
senior member (78)senior membersenior member
 
11/18/2019 09:37AM
I almost forgot the most important thing. The size of your fish should grow each time you tell someone. Have fun !
 
scotttimm
distinguished member (207)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/18/2019 10:34AM
I have a few pieces of advice:

Start with some topwater lures. It has taken me a lot more time to learn to fish for walleye, so why not start with smallies and pike? Our absolute favorite is the whopper plopper. Just cast it out and retrieve it back slowly. Bass and northern pike LOVE this lure and it is a lot of fun when they crash the surface. It might take some time to learn when/how to set the hook, basically quickly and sharply snapping your rod tip back so they don't spit the hook out.

I think the most intimidating thing when you get on a lake is deciding WHERE to fish. You want to look for structure - underwater or above water changes in the lake. If big trees are sitting in the water, bass will be under it, cast near the tree and try not to get your line tangled in it. Points that reach out into the lake will have dropoffs that hold fish. ALWAYS fish where streams come into a lake. Bring a decent net. I like the new ones that are triangular and fold up, cheapish at Bass Pro. You don't want to lift the fish out of the water into the canoe with your rod, you either need to land it by hand or with a net. Get on your knees in the canoe to do so until you get the hang of it, so you don't tip your whole boat over.

Finally, when you hit the outfitter for maps or permit (or bait, or whatever), ask them where to fish and what to use! They'll mark up a map for you, tell you what people have been using, etc. And, if I see people on the water or portages with rods, I ask if they've had luck...if they seem chatty, ask what they were using for bait. If they keep chatting, ask if they are willing to share WHERE they were fishing. Don't be shy. I've found people to be pretty darn friendly sharing tips to help others out.

Finally - have fun!
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
11/18/2019 01:49PM
scotttimm: "Bring a decent net. I like the new ones that are triangular and fold up, cheapish at Bass Pro. You don't want to lift the fish out of the water into the canoe with your rod, you either need to land it by hand or with a net. Get on your knees in the canoe to do so until you get the hang of it, so you don't tip your whole boat over. "
Scott offers a lot of excellent advice, but I'll offer a counterpoint on a couple things.

There have been discussions ad nauseum on this board about bringing (or not bringing) a landing net. Some would never go on a canoe trip without one. Some have never packed one. I'm in the latter group - 30+ years and have never brought a net. Walleyes, smallmouth and even smaller northerns are so simple to land by hand. But... if you're not comfortable with that, bring a net.

As for getting on your knees to land a fish... I say NEVER do that. You're more likely to dump in the transition from sitting to kneeling than you are landing a fish. You're virtually at water level already. Just reach down and grab your walleye behind the head, do the same with northerns or hook a finger inside the gill cover, and lip the smallies... or use the net. You'll be just fine from a sitting position.

Lots of great advice in this thread. You're going to be eating shorelunch every day next summer! :)
 
missmolly
distinguished member(6176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
11/18/2019 04:03PM
Does anyone have ideas for places near Chicago for her to fish? Lake Geneva in Wisconsin has panfish one can see from shore. I'm shore they're eager to nibble at a worm.
 
11/18/2019 04:36PM
missmolly: "Does anyone have ideas for places near Chicago for her to fish? Lake Geneva in Wisconsin has panfish one can see from shore. I'm shore they're eager to nibble at a worm. "


Chicagoland fishing
 
11/18/2019 04:39PM
Given what jackfish was saying about sit-to-kneel.

Be careful in the unweighted canoe!
Wear your life jacket. Fish close to shore, especially if windy, alone, cold etc. TGO (Jim) used to advise rocks for weight in the canoe. I don't want rocks tumbling around in my canoe. But I do want weight when I'm fishing without my packs (which is most of the time). I carry empty drybags. I fill them with water before launch, empty them when done, and carry them in my packs when traveling. This can easily add a range up to 100# of weight to my hull in no time, with no damage and easier to pull out of the boat in the event of a capized canoe (unlike rocks in the bottom of a capsized canoe).

 
AmarilloJim
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11/19/2019 07:57AM
jillpine: (unlike rocks in the bottom of a capsized canoe).

A word of warning. Most canoes are just a hair over neutrally buoyant when submerged.
It is rare that a canoe will completely flip when capsized. Rather they tilt and water rushes in and then right sides itself. Rocks will sink them.
 
missmolly
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11/19/2019 09:50AM
Jenny, family obligations prevent me from traveling to the Midwest, but if you ever want to visit beautiful Downeast Maine, I'll host you and take you fishing. We will catch fish! Maine has a lot of water, but not a lot of people, so the fish are plentiful and dumb, which is my recipe for successful fishing.

Here's a lake just down the road and it's one of thousands. There are so many that some go unnamed, like you find in the wilderness.
 
11/19/2019 01:00PM
AmarilloJim: "jillpine: (unlike rocks in the bottom of a capsized canoe).
A word of warning. Most canoes are just a hair over neutrally buoyant when submerged. It is rare that a canoe will completely flip when capsized. Rather they tilt and water rushes in and then right sides itself. Rocks will sink them."

That was my point, Jim. Sorry if it wasn't clear. The rocks don't float. Nor will the boat. With filled drybags, they are not attached and they don't sink if provided a measure of air. I wasn't advocating the use of rocks for weight.
 
AmarilloJim
distinguished member(1867)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
11/20/2019 08:42AM
jillpine: "AmarilloJim: "jillpine: (unlike rocks in the bottom of a capsized canoe).
A word of warning. Most canoes are just a hair over neutrally buoyant when submerged. It is rare that a canoe will completely flip when capsized. Rather they tilt and water rushes in and then right sides itself. Rocks will sink them."

That was my point, Jim. Sorry if it wasn't clear. The rocks don't float. Nor will the boat. With filled drybags, they are not attached and they don't sink if provided a measure of air. I wasn't advocating the use of rocks for weight. "

Gotcha. I was just tooting the horn. For decades I used to use rocks for ballast. Messing around with my canoes in the shallows at home, I realized how disastrous this practice could be in the wild.
 
GickFirk22
senior member (98)senior membersenior member
 
11/21/2019 01:02PM
MNJenny...What part of the world do you live in, (guessing MN due to your name here)? IF you're in the Twin Cities area, and comfortable meeting a stranger from the internet :) I'd be more than happy to meet up with you to show you how I set up myself for fishing both in the Metro and the BWCA. I'll happily show you my gear, check out what you already have and learn more about what your fishing goals are.

I can also teach you a few knots and talk theory and technique. I'm FAR from an expert (got skunked my last time out too!) but I love solving the puzzle and I love teaching my kids how to fish. Plus the off season is a great time to organize and prepare for open water in 2020 (with bonus black friday sales on the horizon)!

If you're interested at all, shoot me an email in my profile and we can discuss further. No worries either way, there's some great advice already given!
 
blutofish1
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11/23/2019 07:10AM
Jenny, a co-worker of mine wanted to learn to fish and ask for some advice. I shared what I could knots, reading a locator, casting and so forth. He told me he got home for work one evening and found this on the kitchen table. He said it really helped him. It helped him enough he bought a boat and fishes often.
 
overthehill
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11/23/2019 09:01PM
That's my kinda book!
 
Sandman2009
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11/24/2019 10:19PM
Along the book line of learning, I would recommend Walleye Wisdom

I learned a lot from this book!
 
11/24/2019 10:49PM
Sandman2009,

+1 Walleye Wisdom, published 36 years ago in 1983 is sitting in my bookcase among my many fishing books. It’s full of valuable information that can help both beginning and experienced anglers catch more walleye.

MinnesotaJenny ... I highly recommend you pick up this book. An “oldie” but “goodie”.
 
Basspro69
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11/26/2019 08:57PM
MinnesotaJenny: "This is embarrassing, but I’m desperate: I grew up in the Chicago suburbs and have not learned to fish. No one in my family is outdoorsy. I’ve gone with a few people, but they turned out to be impatient and didn’t explain what we were doing or how. I’ve gone countless times myself, yet never caught anything.

Any ideas who does this? Patient people who teach adults? I love to learn new things and ask many questions. I have a couple fishing poles, but don’t know what kind of fish they are for. Thanks"
Would love to give some advice but have to know a couple things . Where are you looking to fish, what season spring summer or fall, and what kind of fish would you like to catch . There are certain lures that are really easy to use like pre rigged jig head and twister tail, mepps spinners , rapalas , and other lures like that. So to help if you know the answers to the first questions people here can really help you .
 
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