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jillpine
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01/18/2020 08:11PM
When I was in first grade (circa 1971), I had a teacher that stood out like Polaris, guiding me well after her death, well into my advancing years. She was, literally, stellar. We were allowed to do "projects" for part of our learning. At the age of five, when more complex fear-based emotions were still knocking at the door and not quite in the living room, the idea of a project was other-worldly. You mean I can learn anything I want, about any topic I want, and then share it?
I chose "eskimos" as we learned back then. I dreamed about running away to live with the tribes of the north. I wanted to hunt and wear caribou, eat walrus, build snow shelters and - of course- run dogs. Ms. Polaris helped me find my sources, including books in the library and documentary films. With her help, we rented the igloo movie linked below and showed it to the entire school.
Imagine the memories that flooded through me tonight when I found it on Youtube, 49 years later, thanks to a link from an MPR article about winter camping.
Shine on, Ms. Polaris. Your memory shines brightly in my night skies!

MPR winter camping

igloo
 
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01/19/2020 10:20AM
Isn't it wonderful to have a teacher that inspires you and shapes the rest of your life?
Jaywalker
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01/19/2020 07:23PM
awbrown: "Isn't it wonderful to have a teacher that inspires you and shapes the rest of your life?"
+1. I remember that very movie and how badly I wanted a snow knife like that.
wingnut
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01/19/2020 08:09PM
Interesting to see how it's done by experts. The sloping curve on the first row, I think is a huge reason the blocks stand on their own as they lean inward. The weight of the blocks rest on the downhill side against the previous block. Also interesting to see they take their blocks from the inside of the shelter.
 
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