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rockinrod12
distinguished member (114)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/14/2020 12:17PM
How or what do you guys use to store your rods so they don’t get damaged portaging. When I used to have cheaper rods I didn’t worry so much but now with more expensive rods I’m looking for alternatives.
 
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Moonman
distinguished member(898)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/14/2020 01:12PM
Funny but I was thinking of making a post on this very subject because this is one of my obsessions, rod cases that are lightweight, robust enough, and not crazy expensive. First thing is is your rod one pce or two piece, fly rods or baitcasters/spinning. Anyway I will share my perspective and info.

Fly rods first. Cheapest lightest solution (asides from the rod case your rod came with, which may be heavy etc), would be to use the protective tubes made for florescent lightbulbs. Home Depot etc. sells them, approx 5-7 dollars. 8’ long, 1.5” in diameter. Cut to length to fit your rod. This has been extensively discussed on some lightweight backing sites. The diameter is too small for spinning rods (bottom guide), and baitcasters would fit except for the trigger at the reel seat sticking out too much. These tubes are strong and will do the job, but just barely so, you cannot abuse them, step on them etc, but they are very light.

For most spinning rods and bait casters the best diy tubes I have found are made from central vac Tubing. It comes in 10’ lengths, is 1.75” in diameter and relatively light. I believe it is technically called schedule 20 pvc (not 100% certain though). They also sell end caps specifically made for it. About 5.00 for a ten foot length and 1.00 or so per end cap. All the big box stores sell them. Will hold two rods if you reverse the butt ends. This post is getting long so will make a separate post on one more option...

Moonman
 
bobbernumber3
distinguished member(1426)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/14/2020 01:21PM
Seems there are two main camps on this topic.

1. Use a rod tube. Extra bulk and weight. Good protection. Store reels in a pack. Fishing while using the tube is not going to happen.
2. Strap the rods under the thwarts and portage them inside the canoe. Cheap, easy, and lightweight. Easy access for fishing while traveling. Need to be careful loading and unloading packs.

I don't take especially good care of my rods so I tend to avoid expensive fishing rods and reels. And I don't feel too bad is one gets bent or damaged. Or dropped overboard.
 
Nytommyt
 
03/14/2020 01:21PM
Pvc tube from Home Depot or Lowes with a screw end cap. You can even strap a handle on it if you want. We put everyone's rods in one tube, about 8 rods for our group usually so diameter will vary on how many rods
you want to put in it.
 
Moonman
distinguished member(898)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/14/2020 01:37PM
The other options as mentioned by nytommyt are various types of pvc. I believe it is all mostly schedule 40. The 3” diameter stuff is very strong and correspondingly heavier, but a good option, and you can get screw on end caps or one you can glue on (bottom end), then put on top cap and duct tape down for the portage in. Can fit 4 rods easily and a good weight trade off. I have all kinds of these in various lengths, for different rods (I have a stores worth of rods). The thing is I always wished I could find pvc of this diameter made out of the thinner central vac like) schedule 20 tubing. Looked everywhere for years even some specialty plumbing stores. I kept reading people in the UK getting stuff like that at their local hardware store. Anyway, I recently found some....round pvc plastic downspout material. Found it a a local Canadian big box store (Reno Depot), Lowe’s and Home Depot do not have it. It was about $15.00 for a ten foot length, 2.75 diameter, and made from the same thinner schedule 20 pvc as the central vacuum tubing. So much lighter than the regular Home Depot stuff. The only problem was no end caps. So for last few years just stared at it and thought of making something but never did. Then a couple of weeks ago, planning my spring trip and which rods I would take, I came upon an elegant solution. The lid for a jar of spaghetti sauce fits inside the tube just perfectly, with the rim of the outer edge flush with the outer tube. It looks like a mailing tube and as if they were made for each other in the same factory. The tubing is very light, strong, and fits four rods. I glued down some soft foam then glued in the bottom cap/lid, did the same for the top, but will duct tape not glue it of course. It’s a snug fit and does not come out easily but for a portage would need to be taped. If you can’t find the round stuff, plastic rectangular downspout might work but not sure on weight or end caps etc.

Moonman.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13089)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
03/14/2020 03:16PM
I made a rod holder from a plastic gutter downspout with two wood end plugs. Very lightweight and strong enough to protect 4 rods.
 
Moonman
distinguished member(898)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/14/2020 04:23PM
Savage Voyageur: "I made a rod holder from a plastic gutter downspout with two wood end plugs. Very lightweight and strong enough to protect 4 rods. "

Hey SV I think I saw you post that solution a few years ago? It looks great and nice thing is it won’t roll around on you. I also used it to hold lures in a custom muskie tackle box I made.

Moonman.
 
cyclones30
distinguished member(2176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/15/2020 07:33AM
We don't use any hard storage container...but we do use a home-sewn fleece rod sleeve my Grandma made like 20 years ago. Between my wife and I we usually bring 3 rods, and when we're packed up and travelling they are BDB'd into the boat. They don't get touched on portages.

Yes we are a little more careful on loading/unloading but since they're all in a single sleeve they don't get hooked by a strap or anything. We've done probably 5 trips this way and never had any issues. This isn't the greatest picture but we pick a side of the boat and tie them in. (spare paddle doing the same thing next to them in this case, rods are in odd leopard print fabric on near side of the boat) We've done this strategy with reels still on and also with reels off and in a pack. Either works fine. We also did this once with just rods tied in and no sleeve, but it was much easier to accidentally hook a rod or line if any of them were strung up. They always go in the sleeve now and no issues.
 
cyclones30
distinguished member(2176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/15/2020 07:39AM
In my picture above, the spare paddle also stays put on portages so...it's more or less a way of guarding against anything hitting the rods too since you'd first hit the paddle with a pack or whatever it might be.
 
ryan72
member (8)member
 
03/15/2020 08:31AM
I've tried multiple options before. I have found that this works awesome and is light weight. It expands to almost double its length and twists locks/unlocks at your desired length. i just ordered another as our group is larger this summer. I can easily fit 4 rods in one tube, probably 5 if I really spend time loading them in properly. The carry strap is nice to have some more options attaching and carrying.

Easton Arrow Tote
 
Moonman
distinguished member(898)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/15/2020 09:11AM
ryan72: "I've tried multiple options before. I have found that this works awesome and is light weight. It expands to almost double its length and twists locks/unlocks at your desired length. i just ordered another as our group is larger this summer. I can easily fit 4 rods in one tube, probably 5 if I really spend time loading them in properly. The carry strap is nice to have some more options attaching and carrying.


Easton Arrow Tote "


Wow that looks awesome. What is the weight of yours? Description says 8 Oz but that seems too light for what I’m looking at....even 1lb would be pretty good. What is the tube diameter? Thanks for posting.

Moonman
 
merlyn
senior member (66)senior membersenior member
 
03/15/2020 06:56PM
Four people on the trip 2 rods per person. We put all the rods (all 2 piece ) in a plastic 2 rifle gun case. Some reels were off the rods. Case was light weight and the foam inside cushioned everything. Handle made portaging easy. Hindsight tells me now that securing the case to the canoe would have been a good idea even tho I think the case would float for a little while. It did cause a few owley looks from a group we passed on a portage.
 
cyclones30
distinguished member(2176)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/15/2020 08:36PM
merlyn: "Four people on the trip 2 rods per person. We put all the rods (all 2 piece ) in a plastic 2 rifle gun case. Some reels were off the rods. Case was light weight and the foam inside cushioned everything. Handle made portaging easy. Hindsight tells me now that securing the case to the canoe would have been a good idea even tho I think the case would float for a little while. It did cause a few owley looks from a group we passed on a portage."

That sounds like a beast to try and carry on a portage. I do put my ice rods in a hard sided gun case for bouncy rides on the ice in the bottom of a sled. I don't think I'd ever think of taking one on a BW trip unless it was more of a basecamp style.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13089)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
03/16/2020 12:04PM
Moonman: "Savage Voyageur: "I made a rod holder from a plastic gutter downspout with two wood end plugs. Very lightweight and strong enough to protect 4 rods. "


Hey SV I think I saw you post that solution a few years ago? It looks great and nice thing is it won’t roll around on you. I also used it to hold lures in a custom muskie tackle box I made.


Moonman."


Yes every time someone asks about a lightweight rod holder I post this one. It’s kind of hard to get a lighter stronger holder in my opinion.
 
ryan72
member (8)member
 
03/17/2020 01:16PM
Moonman: "ryan72: "I've tried multiple options before. I have found that this works awesome and is light weight. It expands to almost double its length and twists locks/unlocks at your desired length. i just ordered another as our group is larger this summer. I can easily fit 4 rods in one tube, probably 5 if I really spend time loading them in properly. The carry strap is nice to have some more options attaching and carrying.



Easton Arrow Tote "



Wow that looks awesome. What is the weight of yours? Description says 8 Oz but that seems too light for what I’m looking at....even 1lb would be pretty good. What is the tube diameter? Thanks for posting.


Moonman "


Took mine out and did some measuring:

If you take out the arrow holder thingy inside it is 12.5 oz.

The inside diameter of the tube is 3 1/8"

The minimum overall length is 22" the maximum is 34 1/2"

For $20 it been a great find for me
 
ericinely
member (30)member
 
03/18/2020 07:49AM
I went with expandable hard-sided rod tubes for years - swearing by them as the only way to keep rods safe over portages and loading/unloading the boat. Here is what I used, which worked great:
https://www.amazon.com/Plano-3-Adjustable-Rod-Case/dp/B000E3E220

However, I have since been convinced that rod tubes are a waste of time (breaking down reels, separating rods, loading and unloading rod tubes,etc.), and aren't necessary to protect your rods. Also, as some of my rods are 7' one-piece walleye jigging rods, I had to expand the tube to 7' or more, which makes it incredibly difficult to fit the tube down in the boat (has to be the first thing in, on the bottom of everything and often limits where you can put your packs and difficult the balance the boat). Currently, I use those expandable rod socks:

https://www.ganderoutdoors.com/outkast-slix-spinning-rod-cover-221344.html?cgid=rod-storage#start=10&cgid=fishing%2Ffishing-rod-reel-accessories%2Frod-storage

and lash up to 6 rods with their reels protected by neoprene reel covers (Cabelas - $10) and lash them all together with bungee dealee bobs:

https://www.boundarywaterscatalog.com/old-scout/bungee-dealee-bob-16894

The bundle of rods will go behind the Stern paddler (sticking straight up pointing backwards) and be the last thing to be taken out of the boat and the first thing to be put back in the boat when loading at the other end of the portage.

As long as you find the balance point on the bundle of rods, they are very easy to carry (I have done this with rods up to 8 feet in length) and can always ditch them along the portage trail if you need to come back for them due to fatigue, thick brush, etc.

Most importantly: this allows me to rig up my rod almost completely and be ready to fish in seconds. You can pre tie all of your leaders, swivels, etc before your trip and be ready to fish immediately after adding your favorite lure or quickly tying on a jig. I will never haul a rod tube into the BWCA or Quetico again - unnecessary extra weight and fiddling with rod setup and breakdown while others are fishing is annoying.

For those of you wondering, yes, I do this with expensive rods and have never broken one using this method. Plus, if you own Gloomis or St. Croix rods, they have a lifetime replacement warranty/deductible program where they will send you a replacement rod for a fraction of the original rod price if you send them the broken rod.
 
SurlyDude
member (35)member
 
03/18/2020 03:07PM
We do the same thing, including typically being the last thing out and first thing in. We even have the extra paddle and collapsible net lashed with the rods as well. Each boat does this with their rods (typically three rods per person). Six years running with no accidents. I usually take the canoe and pack, so this responsibility typically falls on my paddle partner, but he has never complained.
 
Otzi
senior member (65)senior membersenior member
 
03/19/2020 11:09AM
Years ago I had an old cardboard tube with plastic inset caps (think like wrapping paper tube, but thicker and more length); I'm not sure what came in it, maybe a poster for my classroom. I just took duct tape and wrapped it to somewhat waterproof it and improve its durability, and it has lasted over six years and many, many weeks of tripping at this point and worked well. I bungee-tie it to the thwarts and portage with it attached. It was really inexpensive and I will likely do again if this one ever ends up deteriorating.
 
mgraber
distinguished member(1038)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/19/2020 02:41PM
This is what we have done for many years and hundreds of miles and never broken a rod. The key is to ALWAYS carry the rods butt forward, tip behind you, at the balance point. You WILL break rod tips if you carry them tip forward.

I agree you could not pay me enough to carry or pack a rod tube (VERY heavy). Lash three or four together with 2-3 Bungee Dealie Bobs. Our outfits are not real expensive though, around 150.00-170.00 per outfit. I guess that is still over 600.00 in your hand, but probably a lot less than many people's setups.

We do a ton of very rugged Quetico portages every year. I have seen many rods broken lashing them in canoe, both from the packs and from branches that snag them inside canoe. I would not do that either. Just my opinion, do what you feel comfortable with.

Also, always stand your rods up in camp, NEVER lay them down. They will not get stepped on if they are standing straight up and down and out of walking paths.
 
wanderingfromkansas
member (26)member
 
03/20/2020 11:20AM
cyclones30: " "
I think those twist ties by themselves look like an option I'd like to try.
 
eelpout89
member (44)member
 
03/22/2020 01:56PM
Savage Voyageur: "I made a rod holder from a plastic gutter downspout with two wood end plugs. Very lightweight and strong enough to protect 4 rods. "



Great idea! $8 lightweight rod holder that holds 6 rods. Just put 3 rods in one direction and 3 the opposite, tie together and slide em in.

Thanks,

SV
 
GearGuy
distinguished member (108)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/24/2020 12:57AM
https://www.clearcreek.net/CUSTOM-SPINNINGSPEYCENTERPIN-ROD-AND-REEL-CASE_p_47.html

Here ya go. That's the answer to your problem. Don't have to take your reel off, and you don't have to unrig your rod if you carefully split it in half without tangling your line. I have two of them. One for a 7 foot rod split in half, the other for whole single piece 7 for rods. Rigid case, craftsmanship is unmatched. I have a few rods that'd make you cry how much they costed,I wouldn't take them to the bwca without these cases.
 
GearGuy
distinguished member (108)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/24/2020 01:02AM
Also I just store my tubes bungee corded to the under side of the canoe cross bars. Even with my 7 for tube I can just unzip the case and my rods slide right out with no difficulty. Most peace of mind and ease I've ever had with my rods, even my cheap rods. Just slide em back in, zip up and off you go. There's really no better solution and there's no effing way a rod sock is gonna protect my near $500 rods the way they ought to be so just throw that idea out right now in my opinion.... just cause you have a warranty doesn't mean you should use it by not caring for your gear
 
GearGuy
distinguished member (108)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/24/2020 01:08AM
bobbernumber3: "Seems there are two main camps on this topic.


1. Use a rod tube. Extra bulk and weight. Good protection. Store reels in a pack. Fishing while using the tube is not going to happen.
2. Strap the rods under the thwarts and portage them inside the canoe. Cheap, easy, and lightweight. Easy access for fishing while traveling. Need to be careful loading and unloading packs.


I don't take especially good care of my rods so I tend to avoid expensive fishing rods and reels. And I don't feel too bad is one gets bent or damaged. Or dropped overboard.
"


You don't know how to properly store a tube to use while fishing because I use mine all the time while fishing. Not fishing goes right back in, fishing it pops right out... tube doesn't go anywhere. Think of it as a 7 foot long 3 inch wide glove box for your canoe
 
Pikehunter
senior member (100)senior membersenior member
 
03/24/2020 11:01AM
eelpout89: "Savage Voyageur: "I made a rod holder from a plastic gutter downspout with two wood end plugs. Very lightweight and strong enough to protect 4 rods. "

Looks like a great solution



Great idea! $8 lightweight rod holder that holds 6 rods. Just put 3 rods in one direction and 3 the opposite, tie together and slide em in.

Thanks,

SV"
 
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