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ZaraSp00k
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03/17/2020 06:09AM  
everything is closed, whatcha readin'?

here is my recent list:
A history of God : the 4000 year quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam / by Karen Armstrong.
All the talk in Soul Space got me to revisit this book, more info on Islam than I want to know, hell it’s more info on religion than I want to know. Yet, an interesting read.

Classic Krakauer : essays on wilderness and risk / Jon Krakauer.
Selected writings from the author of Into The Wild, some are good, some OK, all are old.

Janis : her life and music / Holly George-Warren.
Live fast, die young, like an auto wreck, you can’t look away. A very good chronicle of Janis Joplin and the SF music scene unfolding during the Summer of Love and the birth of one of my all time favorite rock albums’ Cheap Thrill’s by Big Brother And the Holding Company.

I’ve also read a couple books on Consciousness which I will not mention because they are almost 100% BS and a waste of time. But then what else are you gonna do? If anyone has one written by an author based in real science, I am all ears.
FWIW, use a libraries search function for “consciousness”, to give you an idea of how popular the topic is, sadly, you’d be better off going to a bar (if you can find one open) and talking to the town drunk than reading 99% of them.
 
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Bearpath9
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03/19/2020 06:21AM  
Well, at the moment I am reading "The Tribes of Britain" by David Miles. A history of the settling of the British Isles.

On tap, I have "Agincourt" by Juliet Barker. Basically, a history of the events that led to the War of the Roses.

And when I finish those, I just may re-read "The Great Mortality" by John Kelly (not that John Kelly). A history of the Bubonic Plague in the 14th century. Morbid, I know.

Yeah, I read a lot of history.
 
ZaraSp00k
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03/20/2020 08:35AM  
deja vu, yeah, history is cool
The book I am currently reading is the History of the Ojibway People, a unique book, it was written by William Warren in 1851 before MN became a state and not published until after his death in 1885.
He was born on Madeline Island (LaPointe) in 1825 to a white fur trader father and Ojibwe mother. He started to document the history of the Ojibwe at the age of 17 before the culture was lost (!), his writing comes from talking directly to elders who had direct knowledge of the times and were the keepers of the oral history of the Ojibwe. He married a member of the White Earth tribe and was elected as a member of MN house of representative when it was a territory.
Since it was written almost 200 years ago some of the thoughts and words have might be shocking and controversial to today's readers. But hard to discount or not believe somebody who lived the times and had access to elders who witnessed the arrival of white Europeans.
An amazing book.
 
Bearpath9
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03/20/2020 10:44AM  
That is one thing I discovered early on-you have to take into consideration the time that your material is set in. Attitudes and perceptions are different when you go back in time.
 
03/26/2020 10:08PM  
Waters Beneath My Feet. The book about Jerry Pushcar's canoe trip from New Orleans to Nome. It's been enjoyable escaping away into his canoe adventures.
 
fraxinus
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04/01/2020 02:39PM  
Just starting "The Body: A Guide for Occupants" by Bill Bryson. I'm in awe of how our bodies work, but have very little knowledge of it all. I like his style, not long ago I read his " A Brief History of Nearly Everything", kind of a history of science, geology, physics,chemistry, astronomy. He has an interesting way of relating the personalities and quirks of the researchers and scientists to their period of time, and what was accepted knowledge at that point in time. I'm hoping he follows that in this book.

Thanks for starting this Z. The three books you mentioned sound like they belong on my list.
 
ZaraSp00k
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04/03/2020 09:46AM  
a fitting book to read today:
Climate change and the health of nations : famines, fevers, and the fate of populations
Anthony McMichael

Climate change may be on the back burner, but an interesting read to put it in perspective:
The Little Ice Age : how climate made history 1300-1850
Brian Fagan
 
Wabawho
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04/04/2020 02:36PM  
Zara,

I'm wondering if you read Anna Harris' book Consciousness? I have not read it myself, but had planned to. I would expect it to be as scientifically based as any book could be on the subject. Just wondering if I should remove it from my list?
 
Wabawho
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04/04/2020 02:36PM  
Zara,

I'm wondering if you read Anna Harris' book Consciousness? I have not read it myself, but had planned to. I would expect it to be as scientifically based as any book could be on the subject. Just wondering if I should remove it from my list?
 
ZaraSp00k
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04/08/2020 09:59AM  
I'm fairly certain I read this, but do not NOT read it on my account. I have only read one book worth reading on the topic, my bar is set high. Pursuing this subject has proven to me that very intelligent people can write very unintelligent books. In fact the saying "those who can do, those who can't ... write a book" comes to mind.

I just discovered my library is allowing curb side pickup, so I can toss my personal library aside.
currently reading Brave New World (written 1931), women having lots of sex partners, abortions, who would have thought THAT would become true? LOL, I read it 50 years ago, now I understand why the library sold this book to me for $1 two decades ago, it was dated then and even more dated now.

the alternative is :

I am gross and perverted
Im obsessed n deranged
I have existed for years
But very little had changed
I am the tool of the government
And industry too
For I am destined to rule
And regulate you

I may be vile and pernicious
But you can't look away
I make you think Im delicious
With the stuff that I say
I am the best you can get
Have you guessed me yet?
I am the slime oozin out
From your tv set

You will obey me while I lead you
And eat the garbage that I feed you
Until the day that we don't need you
Don't got for help...no one will heed you
Your mind is totally controlled
It has been stuffed into my mold
And you will do as you are told
Until the rights to you are sold

That's right, folks..
Don't touch that dial

Well, I am the slime from your video
Oozin along on your livinroom floor

I am the slime from your video
Cant stop the slime, people, lookit me go
 
h20
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04/08/2020 07:15PM  
Love Frank.
 
Bearpath9
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04/08/2020 07:29PM  
Sapiens : A Brief History of Humandkind by Yuval Noah Harari

Kinda different, but interesting. Makes you think.
 
04/29/2020 11:17AM  
I finished Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods. A book about Bill walking the Appalachian Trail with his friend. I found the history of the trail quite interesting.

Now I'm onto another Bill Bryson book 'A Short History of Nearly Everything'. So far I am loving it. Sounds like a similar read to what Bearpath is reading. Makes you think. I just love reading about space and science.
 
Bearpath9
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04/30/2020 07:56AM  
Aldy1: "I finished Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods. A book about Bill walking the Appalachian Trail with his friend. I found the history of the trail quite interesting.


Now I'm onto another Bill Bryson book 'A Short History of Nearly Everything'. So far I am loving it. Sounds like a similar read to what Bearpath is reading. Makes you think. I just love reading about space and science. "

Aldy, if you like space and science, give Stephen Hawking's 'A Brief History of Time" a go. I have read it 3 times and still only get about a quarter of it. Makes your head explode.
 
ZaraSp00k
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05/01/2020 10:49AM  
Keep on paddling : true adventures in the Boundary Waters Wilderness
Roy Cerny

I probably shouldn't have read this, now I want to go even more.
An hour paddle on a nearby lake was an enjoyable, but poor substitute.
 
05/04/2020 08:59PM  
Bearpath9: "
Aldy, if you like space and science, give Stephen Hawking's 'A Brief History of Time" a go. I have read it 3 times and still only get about a quarter of it. Makes your head explode."


Ha I tried to read this when I was a teenager. I'm not sure I could quite grasp it at the time, probably due for a re-read.
 
05/05/2020 10:42AM  
Aldy1: "Bearpath9: "
Aldy, if you like space and science, give Stephen Hawking's 'A Brief History of Time" a go. I have read it 3 times and still only get about a quarter of it. Makes your head explode."



Ha I tried to read this when I was a teenager. I'm not sure I could quite grasp it at the time, probably due for a re-read. "


Read that book a couple of times, its deep.
 
05/11/2020 12:16AM  
'Rona Reading Update:

Finished:
+ Canoeing with the Cree - I very much enjoyed the adventure of this story. I thought the perspective of the 1930's made this especially fascinating. I also read Adventure North a few months ago (modern day trip by Chaska boys) and enjoyed that too.

+ Team Human - A compelling read that made an impact on me. In a sad way most of the time but it finishes up optimistic. A manifesto urging society to work together as a team, with a harsh look at how we got here.

+ Waters Beneath My Feet - I wrote my thoughts in another thread. Loved it.

Next Up:
+ The Road - Cormic McCarthy post-apocalyptic novel
+ Distant Fires - Another canoe adventure book, I can't get enough of them. Les Kouba illustrations are a bonus!
+ (Started this one) A Short History of Nearly Everything - Great so far!
 
05/11/2020 07:40PM  
“Paddle to, Through, and Around Alaska” —- Bob Volhaber

Not! :)

I’m currently reading The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson. It’s about doing little things on a consistent basis to eventually reach a goal.
 
straighthairedcurly
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05/14/2020 04:17PM  
"Shooting the Boh" by Tracy Johnstone
Great adventure story about rafting a whitewater river in Borneo.
 
06/15/2020 04:29PM  
Aldy1: "'Rona Reading Update:

Next Up:
+ The Road - Cormic McCarthy post-apocalyptic novel
+ Distant Fires - Another canoe adventure book, I can't get enough of them. Les Kouba illustrations are a bonus!
+ (Started this one) A Short History of Nearly Everything - Great so far!
"


Book update:

+ The Road - This was a dark and depressing book. But it was also a beautiful love story about a father and son. Cormic McCarthy sure can write.

+ Distant Fires - I enjoyed this, but they made some decisions that left me scratching my head. Near the start of their trip, they decided not to bring a tent and then went on to complain about sleeping in the elements. What the heck were they thinking? Have they camped before? They eventually got a tent when they met up with family somewhere in Canada. And then they went on to finish their trip to Hudson Bay with two friends - however on their final two days they paddled on past their friends near a large rapids, the sort of rapids where you'd probably want to make sure your friends are OK. They finished the trip without their friends by a whole day without knowing if they made it past the rapids. Why did they ditch them? It seemed really odd. Anywho, there were other small things like this that made me question these two young men.

+ A Short History of Nearly Everything - Still making my through this. Just a wonderful book.

Next Up:
Not quite sure yet, but I think I'm ready for some fiction.
 
10/25/2020 07:30PM  
I'm getting ready to start (after I finish the latest BW Journal issue) "Killing Sacred Cows: Overcoming the Financial Myths That Are Destroying Your Prosperity" by Garrett Gunderson

But, in September before my BW trip I was browsing the Piragis bookstore and... lo and behold a title jumped out at me. "Blue Highways: A Journey Into America" by William Least Heat Moon. It is a book I read maybe 35 years ago and have always wanted to revisit. This copy is a newer printing with a new forward. I'm very excited to have this again.

Blue Highways

 
JWilder
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11/13/2020 01:14PM  
Currently finishing Stephen King's "The Stand". It's about a mutated strain of the flu that kills 99 percent of the population. A little creepy reading during this current pandemic. Short novel, only 1,500 pages.
What's next?? Not sure, I will need a short break when finished with this one!
 
h20
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11/13/2020 04:41PM  
TomT: "I'm getting ready to start (after I finish the latest BW Journal issue) "Killing Sacred Cows: Overcoming the Financial Myths That Are Destroying Your Prosperity" by Garrett Gunderson


But, in September before my BW trip I was browsing the Piragis bookstore and... lo and behold a title jumped out at me. "Blue Highways: A Journey Into America" by William Least Heat Moon. It is a book I read maybe 35 years ago and have always wanted to revisit. This copy is a newer printing with a new forward. I'm very excited to have this again.


Blue Highways


"
Just reread Blue Highways after it first came out. As good as it was the first time.
 
JWilder
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11/14/2020 09:01AM  
h20: "TomT: "I'm getting ready to start (after I finish the latest BW Journal issue) "Killing Sacred Cows: Overcoming the Financial Myths That Are Destroying Your Prosperity" by Garrett Gunderson



But, in September before my BW trip I was browsing the Piragis bookstore and... lo and behold a title jumped out at me. "Blue Highways: A Journey Into America" by William Least Heat Moon. It is a book I read maybe 35 years ago and have always wanted to revisit. This copy is a newer printing with a new forward. I'm very excited to have this again.



Blue Highways



"
Just reread Blue Highways after it first came out. As good as it was the first time."


After reading the summary/plot of this book. It has been included at the very top of my "must read" list. Sounds like an awesome experience.
 
11/21/2020 12:02PM  
If you get into the Blue Highways book there is a companion that was put out called Blue Highways Revisited.
Blue Highways Revisited
 
h20
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11/21/2020 04:34PM  
Now I'm reading Here, There, Elsewhere, "Unprecedented gathering of William Least Heat-Moon's greatest short-form travel writing." All his writing is good. And make sure to read PrairyErth.
 
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