Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.

Author

Text

TrekScouter
distinguished member (368)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2020 08:34PM
Here is an interesting article on weathervaning from a kayaker's perspective.

As a solo canoist, I've been aware of the forces of crosswinds on the canoe's handling and I have been careful to evenly balance my load from bow to stern accordingly. However, I did not consider the dynamic forces of water pressure as the canoe moves forward.

My takeaway from this article is that in a crosswind situation, a slightly stern-heavy load would give the most neutral handling. Your thoughts?
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
Banksiana
distinguished member(2060)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/25/2020 10:23PM
In my years of paddling an Advantage (a relatively low free-board stern), I would say slightly heavier stern. In slight winds and big winds, its everything I can push to the rear and I'm still C-stroking on one side.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1075)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2020 07:47AM
I had not considered the high and low pressure wake zones before. I did know that slowing down reduced the weather vaning effect. I typically weight the stern a bit heavy, and often move my forward load to fit the situation.

Not mentioned as they were dealing with kayaks. is the craft acting like a sail being pulled downwind by the low pressure zones created by the wind coming over the gunnels, inside the canoe and on the lee side of the canoe. Each Gunnel creating a low pressure zone on it's lee side. A cover from gunnel to gunnel reduces that by nearly 1/2.
 
03/26/2020 10:00AM
I had known about the bow wake zone noting when I approach shallow water the boat wants to veer away. Adding this new understanding is helpful. Thanks.
 
03/26/2020 01:59PM
Question:
Will boats with asymmetrical rocker resist this weathervane effect better than boats with symmetrical rocker? The former typically have less rocker in the stern.
 
Banksiana
distinguished member(2060)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2020 03:07PM
Ausable: "Question:
Will boats with asymmetrical rocker resist this weathervane effect better than boats with symmetrical rocker? The former typically have less rocker in the stern."


Yes.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1075)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/26/2020 07:27PM
So another question is the amount of deadwood also a significant player?
 
TrekScouter
distinguished member (368)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/27/2020 09:30AM
DanCooke: "So another question is the amount of deadwood also a significant player? "Sorry, what do you mean?
 
Banksiana
distinguished member(2060)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/27/2020 10:45AM
Deadwood was the best television show ever created.

Dan- how did the Blackwater perform in regards to crosswinds/weathervaning?
 
03/27/2020 11:57AM
I do not recognize the term deadwood, but if it means some paddlers....
Another good reason to solo.
 
sedges
distinguished member(536)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/27/2020 12:28PM
Deadwood refers to the stem/keel junction when it is a sharp curve or angle. The hull "pinches" in at the area. The area has very little volume and contributes little to buoyancy i.e. "dead" . A skeg would be considered deadwood as well.

Many of the asymmetrical hulls that have more rocker in the bow the keel line runs out almost flat to the stern and sharper curve at the stem/keel junction in the stern.

I really like these hulls and find them much easier to handle in rough conditions. Our "big" boat has this configuration as well as flair the entire length of the hull. Kind of like a dory, but with a shallow-arch bottom. It is our coastal boat that we take out on tidal rivers and sounds.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1075)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/27/2020 12:59PM
Read the shape of the canoe series john winters the shape of the canoe

In section 1 he describes deadwood and how reducing it in the bow can improve "both the steering and directional stability"

All 3 are good reads!
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next