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R00kie
member (25)member
 
09/03/2020 05:07PM  
What do you have in your kits? We all want to keep it small and light so what are your must haves and what can you do without?
 
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09/03/2020 05:59PM  
It partly depends on length of trip, number of people, remoteness, but for a couple of weeks solo in BW, I have Tylenol, anti-diarrheal, anti-biotic, laxative, hydrocortisone, burn kit, wound kit, trauma pack, various bandages/Band-Aids, leukotape/duct tape, tick removal, Amoxycillin, Doxycycline.
 
TechnoScout
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09/03/2020 06:23PM  
boonie: "It partly depends on length of trip, number of people, remoteness, but for a couple of weeks solo in BW, I have Tylenol, anti-diarrheal, anti-biotic, laxative, hydrocortisone, burn kit, wound kit, trauma pack, various bandages/Band-Aids, leukotape/duct tape, tick removal, Amoxycillin, Doxycycline. "

You doc gives you a script for those ABX?
 
Fizzle
member (8)member
 
09/03/2020 08:47PM  



You doc gives you a script for those ABX?"


Doxy and Amox are Rx only but they are very liberally prescribed. To be honest it's 100% unnecessary to bring oral Abx like this as the time it takes for an infection to set in is longer than the time it should take you to go back to a hospital, and if you're in a position to need abx, you shouldn't be self treating. (I'm an RN)

On the other hand, if you want these for ease of mind, or you have that attitude like "I'm going to have everything, cause nothing is going to stop my trip", then I can understand that. You can obtain these antibiotics, well, most antibiotics including stronger ones like azithromycin (in my opinion the only abx worth carrying if you're going one, as this would help with pneumonia and other respiratory infections which can onset rapidly) can be obtained through pet supply websites. you can buy most abx in oral form, meant for fish, and birds. Generally speaking abx meant for dogs and cats go through a vet, but for some reason vets don't care about fish and bird meds so you can just buy them online. Amox and Doxy are generally skin infections, Doxy sometimes can be used for staph infections. Rather than self treating these, I would recommend just cleaning wounds better and having a good wound irrigation set, at least a syringe to squirt water.

Antibiotic resistant infections are absolutely 100% no joke. That'll stick with you for the rest of your life. Food for thought!
 
R00kie
member (25)member
 
09/03/2020 08:53PM  
What is the doxycyline for?
 
09/03/2020 09:26PM  
The doxy was prescribed for tick bites. The amoxy is prescribed for giardiasis (and reasons that may not apply to everyone), onset of which can occur as soon as one week. A solo 3-week trip is plenty of time for it to be a problem. Although the trip has recently been changed from a planned trip in northern Ontario, I still have it. If your trip is short I would not bother. You may not need/want all those, or may have other needs/wants. The Rx's were on recommendation of my doctor. You might want to check with yours.
 
R00kie
member (25)member
 
09/03/2020 09:38PM  
So ... not a "must have".
 
R00kie
member (25)member
 
09/03/2020 09:41PM  
Thanks for the information. I i think its important to hear specific things like that. To help consider things we might nor normally think abour.
 
09/04/2020 07:11AM  
Not a must have for everyone or every trip, but neither are anyone's personal Rx's, Epi-pens, etc. The most used items will likely be blister bandages, Band-Aids, and Tylenol. Maybe wrap for sprains.

The must have is a mindset of prevention.
 
Fizzle
member (8)member
 
09/04/2020 08:02AM  
An Epi pen and oral antibiotics could not be in more opposite sides of the spectrum of "should I have it". If someone has a dangerous allergy to bees for example, they should absolutely bring an Epi Pen. You can use that epi pen for when someone has an allergic reaction to the doxy you just gave them for funsies and now their airway is swelling because you don't have the right training to know that doxy and _____ are actually related when (if) you ask them if they have any allergies. Just throwing (frighteningly likely) hypotheticals out there! But hey, you're more than ready for that fatal skin infection, or fatal diarrhea.
 
scotttimm
distinguished member (434)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/04/2020 08:57AM  
I tend to have a very stocked first aid kit because we always have our kids with us and often their friends, and I have never regretted it. Most things are just bandaids and triple antibiotic, but we've had our share of larger issues. Along with those things already mentioned, some others I wouldn't leave home without:

Super glue for bigger wounds that need stitches or are close to needing a stitch, Steri-strips too. I have used super glue on wounds twice in the bwca.
A MIX of Tylenol and Ibuprofin. If something goes bad, you may need to alternate...see below.
BleedStop powder, can be found at Walmart, in case of serious emergency or in case you come across somebody in serious need. Weighs nothing, why not?
Ace bandage for turned ankles or sore elbows.
Good pair of tweezers.

On the antibiotic thread - I had a tooth removed earlier this year and had 4 days of Penicillin left over, so I threw it in the kit. Before we left, my daughter had an earache and swims a lot, so we thought it was swimmer's ear. Took her to the Dr, he examined her and said it was NOT swimmers ear, she was fine. We left for the BWCA two days later. Three days in - after a lot of swimming at our beach site - she told me her ear was killing her - I looked at it and green goop was seeping out. The pain got exponentially worse, she was in tears and couldn't sleep. We were obviously extremely worried. We were two-days distance in. Only maximum doses alternating ibuprofin/tylenol took the edge off. I remembered that I had the PCN, and I used my SpotX to message a Dr friend who helped me figure out how much penicillin to give her. After 48 hrs it was feeling slightly better, enough to try and work our way back. After two hours in the boat she needed to get off the water and get in shade and lay still. The next morning she was much better and we exited. Hit the doctor again when we got home, and turns out she had a perforated ear drum that was apparently hard to see the first time he examined her. He switched to a different antibiotic and she recovered nicely. SO, I'm really considering what kind of antibiotic would be a good one to have handy in the future...maybe a z-pack would be handy.

So, while I have tried to cut down the weight of everything I bring, my first aid kit will remain very stocked.

 
TechnoScout
distinguished member (379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/04/2020 12:00PM  
I am leaving on my trip Tuesday. My first aid kit is packed, but I am unpacking now to list the contents.
Assorted bandages
Tweezer
Tic remover
Leatherman Micra
Vet wrap
GermX soft wipes
Burn Gel
Providone iodine pads
Alcohol prep pads
Antiseptic towelettes
Triple antibiotic ointment
Aspirin
Ibuprofen
acetaminophen
benadryl
anti gas pils

Everything above come in single-use packets so all of this fits in a pouch 6"x3"x2.5"

I think I will add superglue and syringe for wound cleansing.

Last year, my buddy cut his finger pretty bad. Cleaned it with the providone, made a splint from a piece of birch wood and taped it up. The splint was only to keep him from flexing and opening the wound. Worked out fine.
 
09/04/2020 02:04PM  
The old ski patrol and boyscout in me tends to make me bring a fair amount. I also tend to travel solo with two dogs and go a ways further in, so as Boonie mentioned it makes sense for me to be a bit more ready. With a group its easier to improvise - with just me me, I want to have anything I might need for serious issues. Fits in a small butt bag a bit larger than a Nalgene.

I basically think about the injuries/ailments most likely to be encountered in the wilderness - lacerations/wound care, fractures, sprains, burns, punctures/ticks, dental issues, and general pain. I needed to check my kit so emptied it out and took a photo this morning (and realized I was missing a couple things.)

I also strongly recommend the book NOLS Wilderness Medicine which really does a great job of covering how to care for likely wilderness issues with minimal gear and for extended time. Knowledge is more important than supplies.


 
TechnoScout
distinguished member (379)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/04/2020 09:42PM  
Jaywalker: "The old ski patrol and boyscout in me tends to make me bring a fair amount. I also tend to travel solo with two dogs and go a ways further in, so as Boonie mentioned it makes sense for me to be a bit more ready. With a group its easier to improvise - with just me me, I want to have anything I might need for serious issues. Fits in a small butt bag a bit larger than a Nalgene.
"


Nalgene is a good idea.

I have a Samsplint, but I figure there is plenty of wood to make a splint.
I have several of those clotting packages, but they are pretty old...I have kept them regardless.
 
09/05/2020 08:30AM  
TechnoScout: "Nalgene is a good idea.

I have a Samsplint, but I figure there is plenty of wood to make a splint.
I have several of those clotting packages, but they are pretty old...I have kept them regardless."


To be clear, the Nalgene was just there as a size reference. I have heard of people using them to contain either first aid or survival stuff, but it is hard to get stuff in and out. The reason I like the butt bag is once opened it allows me to access almost anything fairly quickly. Gloves, EMT scissors, and clotting pad go on top for fastest access.

I’m sure one of my clotting pads is expired too, but guessing it would beat bleeding to death. The SAM splint is rather bulky, but they are so fast and do a great job of immobilizing - much better than sticks. Since I may have to apply it to one of my own two arms, or one of my eight dog legs, I really don’t want to be wandering the woods looking for sticks.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13690)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
09/05/2020 10:40AM  
I can’t tell you how many times someone in our group has cut their hands or feet. I know of three times where if we were home, stitches would be needed. I do a lot of woodworking and found just the ticket to be added to a wilderness first aid kit. The first thing is medium thickness CA glue or super glue and a spray can of activator. Wash the cut and dry it, put the glue on and spray with activator. Instant sealing.
 
Flashback
distinguished member (155)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/07/2020 09:49PM  
My wife and I have a well stocked first aid kit; it goes on every river trip we take, whether it is for a day float or for several days, within 10 miles of the nearest hospital or out in the middle of nowhere.

I offer input on it's contents, but defer to her in the final analysis. She started paddling with me in 1979, the year we married; she is no rookie on the river. Has paddled solo canoe for best part of 40 years, and certainly is no rookie when it comes to treating sick or injured people. She has her Master's degree in nursing, and over 40 years of experience.

My expertise was in Avanced Swiftwater Rescue, Canoeing Instructor, Lifeguard Instructor, and Search & Rescue. I was also certified as a Wilderness First Responder; piddling medical training in comparison to hers.

We are both very safety concious; the contents of our first aid kit is typically used to help others, "who don't need a first aid kit"! I am sick of hearing that line.

BOB
 
09/09/2020 11:59AM  
I too have a robust first aid kit. After seeing an "ax in leg" injury several years ago, my kit also includes an Israeli Bandage. It has never been needed, but I have it just in case.
 
09/09/2020 02:05PM  
Scout64: "I too have a robust first aid kit. After seeing an "ax in leg" injury several years ago, my kit also includes an Israeli Bandage. It has never been needed, but I have it just in case. "

My local USFS district has provided volunteer sawyers on trail maintenance crews with Israeli Dressings. . Most of us are also carrying QuikClot or another hemostatic agent, as well. I hope neither ever leaves my first aid kit!

TZ
 
09/09/2020 06:05PM  
TrailZen: "My local USFS district has provided volunteer sawyers on trail maintenance crews with Israeli Dressings. . Most of us are also carrying QuikClot or another hemostatic agent, as well. I hope neither ever leaves my first aid kit!
TZ"


After something of a close call in a remote area, I made a small Cordura pouch to hold an Israeli bandage that is fixed to the back of my chainsaw chaps. Never without it.
 
09/09/2020 07:47PM  
6 regular band-aids, 3 fingertip, a gauze pad, duct tape, neosporin, ibuprofen, excedrin, alcohol swabs, eyedrops and rolaids. Might add a needle and thread for sutures.
 
09/10/2020 01:55PM  
Jaywalker: "After something of a close call in a remote area, I made a small Cordura pouch to hold an Israeli bandage that is fixed to the back of my chainsaw chaps. Never without it."

Your use of chaps will probably prevent your Israeli bandage from ever leaving its storage pouch!

TZ
 
09/13/2020 07:03PM  
TrailZen: "Jaywalker: "After something of a close call in a remote area, I made a small Cordura pouch to hold an Israeli bandage that is fixed to the back of my chainsaw chaps. Never without it."

Your use of chaps will probably prevent your Israeli bandage from ever leaving its storage pouch!

TZ"


They saved my bacon once! Was fascinated to learn the kevlar does not stop the cut like a bullet proof vest, but tangles up the chain and brings it to a halt. Still carrying that bandage as the chaps don't cover the whole body. Won't cut without them.
 
JWilder
distinguished member (275)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/15/2021 08:09PM  
I have touched on a few other threads about my evaluation of my first aid kit (among a few other things).

I wanted to share what I have and get some feedback.

This kit was a purchased first aid kit. I added/subtracted to fit me. This is developed for solo trips, and weighs in at 11 oz. I took a pic of it next to a 32oz Nalgene for size comparison. Here are its contents:

First Aid "cheat sheet"
Tongue suppressor/finger splint
3×3 gauze pads (2)
2×2 gauze pads (4)
1 roll of gauze
Alcohol prep wipes (3)
BZK towlette (3)
Closure strips (6)
Various band-aids
Triple antibiotic ointment (3)
Sting and bite pad (3)
Burn cream (2)
Insect protection cream (3)
Rubber gloves
Q-tips (4)
Safety pins (2)
Adhesive tape
Tourniquet
Hand warmer
Scissors
Tweezers
Razor blade
Benadryl 25mg (6)
Ibuprofen

Anything you would add or subtract?

Is there something I am missing that is essential?

I dont mind a little constructive criticism...

JW

 
scotttimm
distinguished member (434)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/15/2021 10:11PM  
JWilder: "I have touched on a few other threads about my evaluation of my first aid kit (among a few other things).


I wanted to share what I have and get some feedback.

This kit was a purchased first aid kit. I added/subtracted to fit me. This is developed for solo trips, and weighs in at 11 oz. I took a pic of it next to a 32oz Nalgene for size comparison. Here are its contents:


First Aid "cheat sheet"
Tongue suppressor/finger splint
3×3 gauze pads (2)
2×2 gauze pads (4)
1 roll of gauze
Alcohol prep wipes (3)
BZK towlette (3)
Closure strips (6)
Various band-aids
Triple antibiotic ointment (3)
Sting and bite pad (3)
Burn cream (2)
Insect protection cream (3)
Rubber gloves
Q-tips (4)
Safety pins (2)
Adhesive tape
Tourniquet
Hand warmer
Scissors
Tweezers
Razor blade
Benadryl 25mg (6)
Ibuprofen


Anything you would add or subtract?


Is there something I am missing that is essential?


I dont mind a little constructive criticism...


JW


"

I think the most used items in my first aid kit are a small bottle of iodine and a plastic syringe to wash out cuts, scrapes, etc. I add a splash of iodine to a cup of water and feel much better when cleaning out wounds. Someone always gets cut up on our trips, and a couple of deep ones required super glue to close...another small, easy thing to add.
 
03/16/2021 07:19AM  
3M Steri Strips are always in my kit.
 
JWilder
distinguished member (275)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/17/2021 06:14AM  
Thanks for the suggestions. Items added...
 
woodsandwater
distinguished member (328)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/17/2021 07:27AM  
Great suggestions here! Thank you! Get LIQUID Benedryl, not tablet. If someone having a reaction, liquid better than tablet. We also carry some kind of locator beacon, just in case a major emergency.
 
JWilder
distinguished member (275)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/17/2021 07:37AM  
woodsandwater: "Great suggestions here! Thank you! Get LIQUID Benedryl, not tablet. If someone having a reaction, liquid better than tablet. We also carry some kind of locator beacon, just in case a major emergency."

Does the liquid start working faster?
 
straighthairedcurly
distinguished member(893)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/17/2021 08:50PM  
When I am solo, I carry less medications since I have never had an allergic reaction to anything in 50+ years, never get diarrhea, etc.

Solo 1st aid kit:
ankle brace...this is the weak point of my body
vet wrap
safety pins (actual like diaper pins the best)
eye wash/saline
large syringe for flushing eyes
moleskin or Glacier gel
tweezers
non-stick gauze pads
small clotting pads
small super glue
a few bandaids
Biofreeze packets
Tylenol
Ibuprofen
Magnesium (good muscle relaxant)
Nyquil
sudafed
Theraflu packet
alcohol wipes
iodine wipes
paper/pencil

On solo trips so far, I have only used the tylenol, magnesium, Biofreeze, and the ankle brace.

When we traveled with a rookie thru a PMA, I carried a much beefier 1st aid kit since help was harder to reach. We added a Sam Splint, ace bandage, Imodium A-D, Benadryl, Pepto-Bismol, melatonin (for sleep aid), throat lozenges, cough drops, Dayquil, thermometer, steri-strips, Tegaderm, antibiotic cream, anti-itch cream, sunburn cream, emergency blanket, triangular bandage, Israeli dressing, Dentemp kit, lots of extra sizes of gauze pads, and 1st aid booklet. This Large kit was actually split into an "everyday kit" and a "trauma kit" for less common injuries. We actually used a lot of items this trip (no big traumas fortunately) due to our rookie friend dealing with stomach troubles and a nasty ingrown toenail.



 
woodsandwater
distinguished member (328)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
03/18/2021 08:41PM  
I don't know if it works faster but the point is liquid would be easier to get down a throat than tablets if the person was having a reaction and their throat was closing up.
 
R00kie
member (25)member
 
03/18/2021 09:24PM  
I have a big kit every time I pull something out I second guess it and change my mind. Guess I will look to lighten my load elsewhere.
 
03/19/2021 08:55AM  
1. Standard first aid kit, more or less.
2. Isreali bandage.
3. Two epipens.
 
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