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      15 x 15 CCS Tundra Tarp setup advice needed     

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apk
member (12)member
 
09/21/2020 10:08AM
These questions are about a 15 x 15 screen tent style Tundra Tarp. But I imagine the questions would be just as relevant for any square, center peak-rigged Tundra Tarp.

1) When setting the tarp up with corner poles (instead of going to a tree), what attachment method do you use for corner poles? I have been looping a clove hitch onto the "spike" at the top of the pole. This is easier when the pole spike is taller and/or the cord is finer gauge. The shorter spike of the Easton pole that CCS sells combined with a larger gauge line (3mm Lawson Glowire) makes it more difficult to use this method (the clove hitch just barely fits on the spike). So I ended up hitching to the larger part of the pole (which is not great since that part is meant to be adjustable up/down). I was wondering if anyone has a different method for attaching a guy line to a pole.




2) When using a pole (as above) Do you use more than one guy line per corner pole? One seems to work, but I wonder a bit about stability of that. If you use two, can you describe your method for doing this?



3) What do you use to prevent a center pole's spike from pushing too hard into the tarp peak? And to keep just a pole in the Tundra Tarp pole pocket? I ended up putting a rag in there to protect the tarp fabric which also gave the pocket something to grab on to. I am wondering if there is a better method.

 
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Nigal
distinguished member (210)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/21/2020 12:07PM
I’ve always wished I could find a way to hold a paddle handle in place as a center pole.
 
apk
member (12)member
 
09/21/2020 12:28PM
From what I understand the pole pocket works well with a paddle handle. But this tarp is set up pretty high. The peak was maybe 7-8 ft tall. I was using a Kelty adjustable height pole. The spike on that pole does not work too well with the pole pocket at the center peak of the Tundra Tarp, so I added a rag. I'm wondering if others have any tricks they can share for that type of setup.
 
Cedarboy
distinguished member(3412)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/21/2020 03:35PM
I use an old softball that I drilled a hole and put on the end of the tentpole to prevent puncturing the tarp. A baseball would work just as well. My CCS tarps are all rigged with a ridge line for simplicity of setup.
CB
 
apk
member (12)member
 
09/21/2020 03:53PM
Thanks. I was thinking about something like that (tennis ball or squash ball). I'm not sure for the screen tent (which is effectively a 15 x 15 Tundra for its top) that the ridge line setup would work well for me. But I agree it's a nice way to go!

I'll be very curious if anyone has comments about pole guy lines (attachment methods or number). What I'm doing seems to work fine. But it seems like there might be better ways.
 
09/21/2020 04:24PM
Why not turn the pole upside down with the spike in the ground??

Only times I have used poles with my Lean was at home. All my tarp and Lean setups use no poles.

butthead
 
09/21/2020 05:24PM
I've done what Butthead suggests although on rocky ground is not always an option. Otherwise a raquetball works well. just cut or drill a small hole so it won't damage the tarp.

T
 
09/21/2020 05:26PM
FOr the poles on the corner I think 2 lines is more stable. I am sorry I am not much help it has been so long since I did this I don't remember exactly what I did...It was form Cliff Jacobsons Video is what i did.

Now I use a center ridgeline with a CCS ridgeline bag. Pretty slick.

T
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(13370)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
09/21/2020 06:34PM
3) get an old tennis ball and cut it in half to protect the top of your tarp when using a pole. I put the pointy part of the pole in the ground.
 
apk
member (12)member
 
09/21/2020 07:06PM
Haha! Wow, never thought of turning the pole spike down. Excellent suggestion. :-) I will search up that Cliff Jacobson video. Very curious what other pole to guy line(s) connection people use.

Trees are preferable but it's hard to imagine always having the 4 trees in the right spot for this 15 x 15 screen tent, so poles are good insurance. In this case I was at a state park campground and the poles were good to have.

Definitely agree the ridge line bishop bag setup is the bee's knees. Using that on a 10 x 12 tarp. I think it might be tricky to set up the screen-walled tarp that way, though.

Appreciate the replies! Definitely looking for more input if anyone has it.
 
Pilgrimpaddler
distinguished member (173)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/21/2020 09:56PM
apk: "From what I understand the pole pocket works well with a paddle handle. But this tarp is set up pretty high. The peak was maybe 7-8 ft tall. I was using a Kelty adjustable height pole. The spike on that pole does not work too well with the pole pocket at the center peak of the Tundra Tarp, so I added a rag. I'm wondering if others have any tricks they can share for that type of setup."
I use an old tennis ball cut in half with the center pole. Cheap and light!

I also run a ridge line on the diagonal, so there’s only two corners that need to be guyed out.
 
ppine
distinguished member (185)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/22/2020 02:29PM
In the woods I like to use trees to secure the corners of a tarp. With oared boats like rafts and drift boats oars are 9.5 -10 feet and can be used for a center pole. Or you can cut one and add a piece of cardboard so it does not damage the tarp. I like to be able to walk under a tarp and see out when I am standing up.

I have an old Moss tarp and it has saved the day plenty of times on wet spring trips in the desert. Then I use the regular poles which are around 5-6 feet.
 
Nigal
distinguished member (210)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/22/2020 03:24PM
While it doesn’t address your specific needs Winter Trekker has a great video on tarps in general. I’ve been doing it this way for a few years and works great.

https://youtu.be/GqlFP8C_z10
 
apk
member (12)member
 
09/22/2020 03:27PM
Thanks. I do use wintertrekker's method on a different tarp. I agree it is great!

But yeah, this is a square tarp with screen walls on the sides and pretty much requires a center peak style pitch rather than ridgeline. I don't think it would work too well in a ridge line setup. The screen walls are all about 6ft tall (the CCS Screen Tent).

I prefer trees, too! But often finding at least a corner pole or two is necessary.

Cardboard is a great idea, too! Thanks
 
thebotanyguy
distinguished member(769)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/22/2020 05:22PM
You could try posting this question in the "Do It Yourself Gear" forum on this site. There is currently a thread about What to make with a 3D printer . There are some clever folks there, and I would think that someone could design an umbrella-like cap to fit your pole spike.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1136)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/22/2020 07:27PM
Just got back from Sawbill last night late.
About the center turn the pole upside down so the pin is down and the soft rubber foot is up. Some find bringing the cord loop through the 4 webbing loops doesn't hold well enough for their liking. Going through all 4 of them and then through 2-3 more additional loops before bringing the tail of the cord through holds tighter.

For the corners. First tie a bowline on the corner- small loop with enough tail so it will not untie. Then tie a overhand knot on a bight very close to the corner of the tarp. The loop should be large enough to go over the pin but small enough not to slide down the pole.


Next securing the loop from riding up off the pin. put a loop in the rope as pictured below. Note how the tail of the rope going to your anchor point is on top of the loop.


Next flip the loop over the top of the pole as pictured


Then tighten to the pole and set the anchor point with a truckers hitch between the anchor and pole so you can adjust tension.

Then if a second anchor point is desired add the second rope by tying into the original bowline and then connect to the pole with the same flipped over cinch as done before. That will secure a corner pole completly.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1136)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/22/2020 07:47PM
I am not big on adding more to the system to rig a tarp. With cord and a well designed tarp (and poles when no trees or other structure is around) the tarp should be able to be set up without addition stuff. Knowing just a few knots well, and looking at how you are tensioning the tarp so it is secure and will shed rain and wind will lead you to better and quicker tarp set ups.
Knots I suggest knowing. Bowline, Truckers hitch with quick release, Siberian Hitch, Prussic, overhand on a bight and your quick release hitch.
 
apk
member (12)member
 
09/22/2020 07:59PM
Thanks, Dan. Very helpful on the knot to attach to the top of the pole and I will try a few more wraps through the pole pocket loops as well as turning upside down. I'm familiar with bowline and trucker's hitch and use those regularly in my setups.

I know I'll be using poles sometimes because trees are not numerous enough or in the right spot.

Do you use more than one guy line per corner pole? I ended up adding a few extra guy lines in other spots on the tarp because one guy line per pole did not seem enough (at least for the 15 x 15 screen tent if any wind had picked up -- was fine with smaller tarps and one guy line coming off the pole).

I am mainly just curious if other pole-users have a system they like for attaching a second guy line in a v-formation on a pole. I'll keep experimenting but definitely appreciate any input.

EDIT: I see the method you mentioned, Dan: "Then if a second anchor point is desired add the second rope by tying into the original bowline and then connect to the pole with the same flipped over cinch as done before"

This seems much more solid. Thanks for the advice.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1136)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
09/22/2020 08:11PM
In an open field set up I usually run two lines per pole. When I was out on the Tundra the second line was always tied onto the original bowline. In a hard wind it may be required to drop one or two sides down to the ground and have more of a diamond set up. It just sheds the wind better. In the BWCA I have had to anchor a 15 x 15 to the ground with 6 anchors along on edge and two lines parallel to the anchored edge to be able to withstand the winds after they had travel for over several miles on a reach. There is a limit to everything.
 
apk
member (12)member
 
09/22/2020 08:47PM
Awesome. Really appreciate this kind of info. Thanks, Dan!
 
ppine
distinguished member (185)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
10/04/2020 01:12PM
I use an old Moss parabolic tarp for canoe camping that comes with its own poles.
I went on a pack trip with horses with a friend that used a big blue tarp around 20 feet square for his camps. He cut a pole around 8-9 feet for a center pole and covered it with a folded piece of cardboard so it would not puncture the tarp. Then we tied the corners and edges to trees with paracord. It was big enough to sleep under and protect all of our gear. We could see out while standing up. It was large enough to protect our camp even in a wind driven rain. I will never forget how comfortable that was in the rainy summers in Wyoming in the Big Mountains.
 
apk
member (12)member
 
10/05/2020 11:31AM
Just posting again now that I have had a chance to use this pole attachment method a few times.

It works great! Very solid way to connect the tarp to a pole. Thanks, Dan!


DanCooke: "For the corners. First tie a bowline on the corner- small loop with enough tail so it will not untie. Then tie a overhand knot on a bight very close to the corner of the tarp. The loop should be large enough to go over the pin but small enough not to slide down the pole.



Next securing the loop from riding up off the pin. put a loop in the rope as pictured below. Note how the tail of the rope going to your anchor point is on top of the loop.



Next flip the loop over the top of the pole as pictured


Then tighten to the pole and set the anchor point with a truckers hitch between the anchor and pole so you can adjust tension.

Then if a second anchor point is desired add the second rope by tying into the original bowline and then connect to the pole with the same flipped over cinch as done before. That will secure a corner pole completly."
 
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