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Rodgifier
member (8)member
 
12/22/2020 01:10PM  
Hey all, in February, I'm planning on doing my first winter trip.

Question: after some research, I've figured that the best way to get water up there is with an ice chisel. There are so many out there that I'm not sure which one to get. Is there one that you recommend? I'd like to spend no more than $70.

The Lure of the North chisel looks amazing, but is outside my budget at the moment. Do most people just use a standard ice fishing spud bar?

I'll be using a pulk to transport gear. Any advice or recommendations would be greatly appreciated!
 
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Northwoodsman
distinguished member(1836)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/22/2020 03:52PM  
An auger may be lighter and safer. I have seen many chisels end up at the bottom of a lake but never an auger.
 
12/22/2020 06:42PM  
I’ve thought about getting a chisel as they are so much more space efficient than an auger, but chipping through 36 inches of ice for water takes a while. And if I’m ice fishing and need several holes, the chisel is too much work. I curse every time a pack my auger on my toboggan, but can’t find a better choice.
 
Minnesotian
distinguished member(2140)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/22/2020 07:14PM  
I have brought both on previous winter camping trips. I brought them both because I didn't know any better.

I only bring the auger now. Sure, it's bulky compared to the chisel, but it makes cutting holes in the ice a lot easier and faster.

I can't find who made the chisel I have, but it is a two piece where one piece threaded into the other.

Oh, and if you are interested, there is a separate Winter Camping Forum here on the site that could help you out on questions you may have:

Winter Camping Forum
 
Arcola
distinguished member (279)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
12/22/2020 08:15PM  
I bring BOTH because I never cross unknown ice without one. My observation is that many people worry about weight only to haul chairs, cots, wannigans, tables, cast iron, and all manner of other things heavy. It's all fine if it works for you and is acceptable;bring what you like. My point is that an ice chisel can check the ice as you travel. Two pokes or more i'm good, but if it goes through in one I turn back!! You can also chip down 10"s or so then auger a hole if the ice is 24+" to fill it creating a well to immerse you water getters .
Also, there is little worse than a dull auger to bore a hole where as a dull chisel will hammer through.
 
Rodgifier
member (8)member
 
12/23/2020 12:47PM  
Great advice everyone, thanks!
 
schweady
distinguished member(7858)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
 
12/23/2020 12:49PM  
And, hey... welcome to bwca.com!
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(14174)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
12/28/2020 10:50AM  
If you bring an ice chisel, make sure you have a strong rope on it tied to your arm. I saw one go through the ice and right out of my brothers hands.
 
12/28/2020 10:35PM  
Rodgifier: "Hey all, in February, I'm planning on doing my first winter trip.

Question: after some research, I've figured that the best way to get water up there is with an ice chisel. There are so many out there that I'm not sure which one to get. Is there one that you recommend? I'd like to spend no more than $70.

The Lure of the North chisel looks amazing, but is outside my budget at the moment. Do most people just use a standard ice fishing spud bar?

I'll be using a pulk to transport gear. Any advice or recommendations would be greatly appreciated!"


I saw you also posted a similar question on a winter camping FB site, and was a bit surprised several people enthusiastically promoted chisels. Can’t find that post any more, but was very curious to know what people’s experience is about time it takes to to chisel through 30-36 inches of ice. Assume the hole only has to be big enough for water - not ice fishing. It seems very slow to me, but if that is not accurate I’d love to know.
 
ArrowheadPaddler
distinguished member(693)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/03/2021 09:05PM  
I have a chisel I purchased from Pole and Paddle. I bring both the chisel and an auger on trips. I use the chisel to test for ice thickness in sketchy areas, to open old frozen holes, or to use as a backup in case the auger breaks. Once the ice gets thick, the auger is much faster, especially if you are drilling multiple holes for ice fishing.
 
mutz
distinguished member(1256)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/04/2021 11:21AM  
Jaywalker: "Rodgifier: "Hey all, in February, I'm planning on doing my first winter trip.


Question: after some research, I've figured that the best way to get water up there is with an ice chisel. There are so many out there that I'm not sure which one to get. Is there one that you recommend? I'd like to spend no more than $70.


The Lure of the North chisel looks amazing, but is outside my budget at the moment. Do most people just use a standard ice fishing spud bar?


I'll be using a pulk to transport gear. Any advice or recommendations would be greatly appreciated!"



I saw you also posted a similar question on a winter camping FB site, and was a bit surprised several people enthusiastically promoted chisels. Can’t find that post any more, but was very curious to know what people’s experience is about time it takes to to chisel through 30-36 inches of ice. Assume the hole only has to be big enough for water - not ice fishing. It seems very slow to me, but if that is not accurate I’d love to know. "



It’s been a long time since I had to use my spud when I went ice fishing to make a hole, but I know it took long enough even with 12-15 inches of ice that you didn’t have multiple holes before you started to fish. I do remember when a friend got a hand auger (the original ones weren’t very good, the scoop type), he still had four holes drilled and he and his son fishing before I had one hole in. By the time you got to 25 inches of ice, you looked for old holes that hadn’t frozen all the way and reopened them.
 
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