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EddyTurn
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10/04/2021 05:26PM  
Reading latest jillpine thread ("hybrid solo"), I wonder what are other people's criteria of reliable rain gear? Jillpine says she switched from gear weighing 0.5lbs to something twice that heavy. For me it would be jumping from the frying pan into the fire. Am I wrong?

After trying different brands and models, I found that to stay comfortably dry in driving rain while portaging (for hours) and paddling (for hours), I need something much heavier. My waterproof jacket, pants and hat (OR Foray gear and Seattle Sombrero hat) weigh in total 2.2lbs. That includes 3/4-length zips on pants and the jacket enforced in areas where heavy pack straps (or canoe pads) would easily wear off thin fabric.

Of course, this year I've been out in the wild for 25 days and it didn't rain once...
 
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straighthairedcurly
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10/05/2021 10:50AM  
I have tried the typical Columbia or North Face Gortex rain jackets and hate them. I always get sweaty and feel slimy.

This year, I bought an Enlightened Equipment rain jacket (I never wear rain pants in the summer because I always wear quick dry shorts and never get cold). So far, I love my new rain coat. I only had to use it in the rain once this year, but it was pretty constant rain and I was out paddling for hours in it. I stayed beautifully dry. The cuffs velcro really tightly so I didn't even get a drip past my wrists. I didn't get sweaty and slimy feeling, either.

Now, it is a lightweight jacket so I don't have a track record yet of how it holds up to years of portaging in the rain, but it is designed for backpackers so I have to believe it will last a decent amount of time.
 
jillpine
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10/06/2021 07:44PM  
The heavier rain gear was what I had in the ninth hour. The lighter weight summer gear was leaking and old.
 
jillpine
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10/07/2021 03:18AM  
 
10/07/2021 08:03AM  
After decades of backpackinging/tripping, I finally gave up on "waterproof-breathable" raingear. Marketing hype that does not work in my real world; I find mechanical ventilation superior to membrane ventilation.
I now have SilPoly stuff - custom hooded jacket with big pit zips for ventilation. I think it weighs 5 or 6 oz.
 
EddyTurn
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10/07/2021 10:43AM  
@jillpine: Some of us paddle left and some - right. I didn't mean to be critical in any way - there's more than one proper way of doing things (often, more than a dozen), and what works for some doesn't for others. Our physical and mental built, group dynamics and priorities, geography, topography, climate, our goals and timelines - together and to varying degree influence our choices. In my personal universe ultralight gear doesn't provide enough protection for purely mechanical reasons and I wonder what others think of this opinion. Especially those who don't agree with it.

@sns: I sweat easily and pure plastic makes me as miserable as sitting in city traffic. I shall look into silpoly - haven't heard of it. But pit zips are of little use if one wants to keep his paddle more or less vertical.

@straighthairedcurly: I'll look at the jacket you mention. In my experience backpacking loads often average at 30-40lbs, which is much less than what I carry on portages. Also, yoke pads shifting on top of the pack straps don't make things easier. If an unfortunate fall on the trail could totally strip one of my pads from its foam, I wonder what it could do to DWR coating on ultralight fabric.
 
jillpine
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10/09/2021 07:38PM  
EddyTurn: "@jillpine: Some of us paddle left and some - right. I didn't mean to be critical in any way - "

Eddy, I was asking for critical feedback when I originally posted. My original post wasn't clear. The high summer rain gear was old and in need of replacement. The shoulder season gear was what I had and, in retrospect, was deadweight. I used to paddle with a guy who brought a contractor bag when paddling in August. I think he was onto something.

To SNS's point, mechanical ventilation is the best. My old summer gear was a simple (but not cheap) Patagonia H20 with long zippers laterally. I think I will replace it. It really worked well for the fifteen years or so that I had it.

Did just finish a brief October solo in a drenching mist. The shoulder season gear was nice to have. Everything was soaking wet from the mist. Hope it continues for a bit then turns to snow, and lots of it!

 
jillpine
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10/09/2021 07:45PM  
 
DanCooke
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10/10/2021 10:44AM  
The trouble with taking rain gear to the limit is the line of what weather you encounter is always changing. This summer in Alaska We encounter 11 straight days of rain. Staying dry was a challenge at times while paddling. My upper body was good for the most part of a 6 hours of paddling in a steady rain. My pants left plenty of room for improvement. And as equipment ages/ degrades there comes that point where it no longer keeps you dry. I would rather cut weight elsewhere than in my rain gear.
 
MReid
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10/10/2021 12:57PM  
DanCooke: "The trouble with taking rain gear to the limit is the line of what weather you encounter is always changing. This summer in Alaska We encounter 11 straight days of rain. Staying dry was a challenge at times while paddling. My upper body was good for the most part of a 6 hours of paddling in a steady rain. My pants left plenty of room for improvement. And as equipment ages/ degrades there comes that point where it no longer keeps you dry. I would rather cut weight elsewhere than in my rain gear. "
One word--Helly Hansen.
 
10/11/2021 08:45AM  
DanCooke: "The trouble with taking rain gear to the limit is the line of what weather you encounter is always changing. This summer in Alaska We encounter 11 straight days of rain. Staying dry was a challenge at times while paddling. My upper body was good for the most part of a 6 hours of paddling in a steady rain. My pants left plenty of room for improvement. And as equipment ages/ degrades there comes that point where it no longer keeps you dry. I would rather cut weight elsewhere than in my rain gear. "

I'd be interested in what you finally chose as rain gear for tops and bottoms. I think that like a lot of folks on this site, I've had my ups and downs with various brands of lightweight rain gear. I had a Marmot parka that leaked and was sweaty to wear. My wife bought me a Columbia brand parka which seems to work a whole lot better, but I'm always thinking about how I might upgrade to something far more durable and weatherproof for that eventual trip to the far north.
 
10/11/2021 01:56PM  
MReid: "DanCooke: "The trouble with taking rain gear to the limit is the line of what weather you encounter is always changing. This summer in Alaska We encounter 11 straight days of rain. Staying dry was a challenge at times while paddling. My upper body was good for the most part of a 6 hours of paddling in a steady rain. My pants left plenty of room for improvement. And as equipment ages/ degrades there comes that point where it no longer keeps you dry. I would rather cut weight elsewhere than in my rain gear. "
One word--Helly Hansen."


Any specific recommendation from experience?
 
DanCooke
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10/11/2021 02:59PM  
The three Adlults on the Noatak all had Arc'teryx Jackets that performed very well. Pants did not . My Marmot brand pants let rain in, and the other folks also had issues with the rain pants they had. I just ordered Helly-Hanson Verglas Infinity Waterproof Shell Pant. I hope they will serve me well in my next adventure- TBD at this point. I also was looking a Sailing Bibs- but the weight and bulk kept creeping upward. If I only canoe it would not be much of an issue. But I also like to do some backpacking.
 
MReid
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10/11/2021 03:08PM  
boonie: "Any specific recommendation from experience?"
I've used the HH Impertech line on two big trips (6 weeks in N Canada, 4 weeks on the Noatak a few days before Dan). It's totally waterproof, stretchy, and vents well with a back vent. On the (very wet) Noatak trip, each of the four of us used different setups--me with my lightweight Impertech, another seasoned vet in Haglofs commercial rain gear, one in new Columbia, and another in Goretex. The one in Goretex was eyeing my Impertech.

The nice thing about the truly waterproof stuff is that you're not so reliant on the DWR treatment of the outer nylon. When the DWR is new it works well, but you have to maintain it by washing in a special soap and retreating it or ironing it. I've used Goretex since 1978, and I've pretty much always gotten wet in it, despite maintaining it, and I hate the 2 layer stuff--it feels like you're wet whether you are or aren't. I use 2 layer Goretex for backpacking (and try to plan for good weather), and my HH for all canoeing where weight isn't such an issue and where you're out there for a looong time. The Impertech is quite a bit lighter than commercial stuff, but is heavier than the lightweight backpacking stuff. I almost always paddle with my rain gear over my PFD, which allows the back vent to work, and lets me take off the raingear when not needed much more quickly--helps in the dryness.
 
jillpine
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10/11/2021 08:37PM  
HH Aurora shell for the pants.
An outdated HH anorak with a wool base layer for the top.
 
MossBack
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10/12/2021 09:44AM  
Never met a rain suit I liked. "Breathable" is smoke and mirrors unless you are not doing anything but sitting still. On returning from one trip that left me wet every day, I cut my suit into pieces so no one else would ever have to suffer it.
 
10/12/2021 03:26PM  
Thanks, MReid
 
deerfoot
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10/12/2021 06:18PM  
I have used HH over 10-12 years and the jacket performed well over much of that time, the pants not so much. I really liked the durability of the HH suit. And my experience is that when you spend enough time in the rain you will get leaks.
 
ockycamper
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12/22/2021 06:04PM  
I bought Cabelas rain jacket and pants over ten years ago. Both goretex and lifetime guarantee. The jacket accepts a zip in polar fleece liner jacket. Very breathable and I have never been wet in these. Over $250 for the set but worth every dollar. You get what you pay for.
 
12/25/2021 09:56AM  
I bought a Frog Tog (premium version, not the cheap tyvek) for a bout half the price of the Cabela's rain jacket, but almost identical. Light, doesn't make me sweat. Also bought a pair of Cabela's rain pants, light comfortable and keeps me dry.
 
12/29/2021 06:09PM  
Shortly after this thread was up, my aging light weight rain jacket had a seam pull out. Based on MReid's strong recommendation, I bought an HH Impertech jacket and will be evaluating it in the spring. It is lighter than I thought, but heavier than my old jacket. I will likely also get a good GoreTex or similar jacket for summer, but will be curious to see how Impertech might work for shoulder seasons.
 
01/05/2022 01:49PM  
Jaywalker: "Shortly after this thread was up, my aging light weight rain jacket had a seam pull out. Based on MReid's strong recommendation, I bought an HH Impertech jacket and will be evaluating it in the spring. It is lighter than I thought, but heavier than my old jacket. I will likely also get a good GoreTex or similar jacket for summer, but will be curious to see how Impertech might work for shoulder seasons. "

What does it weigh? I've been trying to find that info, but doesn't seem to be on HH website or Amazon, or any of the gear review sites that I found.
 
01/05/2022 05:59PM  
dogwoodgirl: "Jaywalker: "Shortly after this thread was up, my aging light weight rain jacket had a seam pull out. Based on MReid's strong recommendation, I bought an HH Impertech jacket and will be evaluating it in the spring. It is lighter than I thought, but heavier than my old jacket. I will likely also get a good GoreTex or similar jacket for summer, but will be curious to see how Impertech might work for shoulder seasons. "


What does it weigh? I've been trying to find that info, but doesn't seem to be on HH website or Amazon, or any of the gear review sites that I found.
"

Mine is 29.5 oz. That’s for a 2XL. I usually go with an XL which is still roomy, but wanted extra space to ventilate, and to allow it to easily go over my PFD. It’s about twice the weight of several 2 and 3 layer Gortex jackets, but still seems a good deal lighter to me than some rubbery coated jackets.
 
MReid
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01/06/2022 12:02PM  
dogwoodgirl: "What does it weigh? I've been trying to find that info, but doesn't seem to be on HH website or Amazon, or any of the gear review sites that I found."

I just weighed my Impertech--Med, 27.2 oz. My previous one (2001) was lighter--22.9 oz. In comparison my Lg Moonstone PacLite Goretex (2 layer) weighs 13.8 oz.
 
01/06/2022 02:11PM  
Thanks!
 
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