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Hammertime
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01/20/2022 09:44PM  
How is everyone rigging their slip bobbers?

I have always used the smallest thill nite brite bobber with a couple split shot and a #6 octopus hook (tipped with a leech of course) on 6 lb mono. While this setup has filled the boat more times than I can count there are some issues with it. Casting distance is poor, it can tangle on a cast and the bait can take a long time to reach the proper depth (especially if it’s windy). Also if you drift into a snag you can lose the entire rig.

I’m thinking about upsizing everything, using a heavier main line, heavier sliding weight above a swivel with a lower lb test leader so if I get hung up I only lose the hook/jig. Wondering how many bites this might cost me. Also intrigued about using a jig under a bobber, have never tried it but there is no reason it wouldn’t work.

- What size and model of bobber are you using?

- What kind of sinker are you using (split shot, sliding weight)

- Plain hook (size and type) or a jig?

- Line weight and type?
 
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01/21/2022 06:00AM  
Fresh line without curl. 6 lb should be okay.
Single weight... no double split shots.
Plain hook. Save the jigs for jigging.
No extra gear like a swivel.
Lose a hook, no problem. You have spares.
Bead below knot is optional.
Bobber about the size of a 50 cent piece.
Do not use a bait holder hook with a leech, but must have a barb.

I assumed you are fishing for walleyes. Your rig sounds small.
 
01/21/2022 07:38AM  
6lb spiderwire all the way through the setup - no swivel or splitshots or anything. Jighead on the end with a leach.
 
Savage Voyageur
distinguished member(14073)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished membermaster membermaster member
 
01/21/2022 08:46AM  
I take a variety of sizes of slip bobbers for both day and lighted bobbers for night fishing. Most are slip bobbers but I also bring the tall bobbers so I can see them when fishing in waves.

Two things are at play here.

1) I use #8 Triline XL (extra limp) line. I feel the XL line is so much better than the XT (extra tough) line when using it for slip bobbers. The XL line slides much better through the bobber tube and stop bead and casts father than the XT line.

2) I also bring lots of split shot weight sizes, large, medium, small. I add just enough weight so the bobber stands up correctly in the water and gets the hook down fast. Too much weight will get the hook down but the bobber will not float correctly. Not enough weight and the hook will take forever to get down, and the bobber will not stand up. Not enough weight and the walleye will spit out the hook before you can set the hook, when it senses the extra tension from the buoyant bobber.

The amount of weight added also is important when fishing in windy or waves. This is when you will need to adjust the weights because of the bobber will be bouncing in the water.
 
thegildedgopher
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01/21/2022 09:01AM  
I don't have experience using a jig under a float. Seems like it'd be nice and simple, but have never done it.

I go with a barrel swivel and an egg sinker over splitshot, for a few reasons:

- Seems to get down faster.
- I feel splitshot necessarily compromises line strength when you crimp it on.
- Splitshot is attached to the line and makes the entire rig feel heavier to the fish, same as a jig. Whereas the egg sinker allows the line to pass freely through it with little resistance. Meaning you can use more weight without the negative effects that go along with adding multiple split-shot and risking line abrasion.

My preferred set up:

8 lb mono
stop knot
Thill splash bright float
egg sinker, 1/4 oz
barrel swivel
length of 8lb mono to equal my desired distance off the bottom
small red octopus hook or a phelps floater jig.


 
papalambeau
distinguished member (182)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/21/2022 09:18AM  
Rig our slip bobbers the same way but when it gets windy we do make the change from a plain hook to a jig. This helps the leech to get down faster and the action picks up.
 
AirPrex
senior member (88)senior membersenior member
 
01/21/2022 10:16AM  
We usually just use jigs on the end as it's simple and when paired with a 5" Thill Nite Brite bobber, which is a bit heavier, can be cast extremely far from camp which is where we're usually bobber fishing. The casting capability I think is the main advantage to just using a jighead. We also use the Nite Brite's whether it's day or night so we don't have to pack a multitude of bobbers. I'm sure the argument could be made that we've missed a picky fish or 2 over the years by using the jigs instead of a plain hook but we still catch plenty this way.

This year we're ordering some of these Slip Lock Bobbers to try. Will allow us to go from jigging to bobber fishing without needing to retie which will be convenient if it works as advertised.
 
thegildedgopher
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01/21/2022 12:21PM  
AirPrex: "We usually just use jigs on the end as it's simple and when paired with a 5" Thill Nite Brite bobber, which is a bit heavier, can be cast extremely far from camp which is where we're usually bobber fishing. The casting capability I think is the main advantage to just using a jighead. We also use the Nite Brite's whether it's day or night so we don't have to pack a multitude of bobbers. I'm sure the argument could be made that we've missed a picky fish or 2 over the years by using the jigs instead of a plain hook but we still catch plenty this way.


This year we're ordering some of these Slip Lock Bobbers to try. Will allow us to go from jigging to bobber fishing without needing to retie which will be convenient if it works as advertised."


If the order hasn't been placed, save your money. The bobbers themselves are fine, but the bobber stops are a disaster. I found I don't like leaving a regular thread bobber stop on my line when I'm not using a bobber, so they became pretty pointless for me.
 
AirPrex
senior member (88)senior membersenior member
 
01/21/2022 01:11PM  
thegildedgopher: "If the order hasn't been placed, save your money. The bobbers themselves are fine, but the bobber stops are a disaster. I found I don't like leaving a regular thread bobber stop on my line when I'm not using a bobber, so they became pretty pointless for me."

Good to know - thanks for the feedback!
 
01/21/2022 02:08PM  
thegildedgopher: ".... I don't like leaving a regular thread bobber stop on my line when I'm not using a bobber, so they became pretty pointless for me."

I don't mind fishing with a knot on my line. Other than that any issues?

I think I'd like a non-lighted version.
 
01/21/2022 04:25PM  

I think I'd like a non-lighted version."


We use the thill night light brand so its always lit - easier that way, and one will usually last most of the trip for me - bring a few extras as it seems one always seems to not work. Can't beat watching that red bobber disappear underwater at night!!!
 
HayRiverDrifter
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01/21/2022 04:34PM  
I use a jig and a leech under the bobber mostly. I tie my own knots.
 
eyestalker
distinguished member (107)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/22/2022 09:59AM  
Usually run 8lb mainline, small barrel swivel then some 6lb fluorocarbon as a leader ~2-3'. Use a 1/8oz jig for leeches as it keeps them swimming horizontally like they naturally would. If using a plain hook I run hook through middle of leech and they swim same way. Minnows I use plain hook or a teardrop similar to how you'd do an ice fishing setup and run hook parallel with spine not crossways. Usually run only lighted bobber as they work whenever you fish and I use unwaxed dental floss for my bobber stop. It can be left on line if you switch to a casting presentation or whatever and its on there when you go back to bobber fishing.
 
ericinely
distinguished member (283)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/22/2022 02:59PM  
In my opinion, ditch the slip bobber and bring one jigging rod. Unless you are fishing from shore, I don't believe a slip-bobber really provides any real benefit you can't achieve over jigging. It just ends up being a bunch of extra tackle, an extra rod (or lots of tying and re-tying). I spend all day out in the boat, I would rather be mobile, increase my area and speed of search and work varying depths to find the fish quicker. Even if you've found "the spot" on a lake that is just packed with fish, I still think a jig is the most effective method of fishing. Watching a bobber go down is a lot of fun, but I think feeling the tap of a fish gobbling up your jig is even more enjoyable.
 
Hammertime
distinguished member (119)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/22/2022 05:09PM  
Thanks for the responses everyone!

Definitely going to experiment with some of the ideas suggested here. If I don’t like it I can always go back to old faithful.
 
Hammertime
distinguished member (119)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/22/2022 05:10PM  
ericinely: "In my opinion, ditch the slip bobber and bring one jigging rod. Unless you are fishing from shore, I don't believe a slip-bobber really provides any real benefit you can't achieve over jigging. It just ends up being a bunch of extra tackle, an extra rod (or lots of tying and re-tying). I spend all day out in the boat, I would rather be mobile, increase my area and speed of search and work varying depths to find the fish quicker. Even if you've found "the spot" on a lake that is just packed with fish, I still think a jig is the most effective method of fishing. Watching a bobber go down is a lot of fun, but I think feeling the tap of a fish gobbling up your jig is even more enjoyable."

I agree with much of this. Every time I load the canoe to go fishing I have one rod rigged with a bobber and one with a jig. It is hard to beat feeling the bite and crossing their eyes with a hookset, but sometimes you just want to relax and watch a bobber.
 
Hawk777
member (42)member
 
01/22/2022 06:45PM  
I've always used a 3/8 Thill Wobble Bobber. Could go with a 1/4 oz too if wanted. I use a 1/8 weight between swivel & bobber stop. Always used 10 lb braid with 10 lb leader. Never failed.
 
01/22/2022 07:28PM  
Post-spawn walleyes can be pretty lethargic. A slip bobber is the ticket when they won't even chase a jig.
 
01/23/2022 07:27AM  
The problem with a jig is the amount you lose when fishing from shore and nothing is more relaxing then sitting in my chair, talking bs, and watching my slip bobber. I like to use a jig with a slip bobber as I seem to have less problems with the fish swallowing the hook.
I have been using jigs more when in the boat lately because they are more efficient to fish with.
 
thegildedgopher
distinguished member(1304)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/23/2022 07:31PM  
bobbernumber3: "thegildedgopher: ".... I don't like leaving a regular thread bobber stop on my line when I'm not using a bobber, so they became pretty pointless for me."


I don't mind fishing with a knot on my line. Other than that any issues?


I think I'd like a non-lighted version."

They’re plastic, and I prefer balsa, but the bobber itself is fine.
 
01/24/2022 07:06AM  
thegildedgopher: "bobbernumber3: "thegildedgopher: ".... I don't like leaving a regular thread bobber stop on my line when I'm not using a bobber, so they became pretty pointless for me."



I don't mind fishing with a knot on my line. Other than that any issues?



I think I'd like a non-lighted version."

They’re plastic, and I prefer balsa, but the bobber itself is fine."


Gotta have balsa on canoe trips. With a plastic bobber, one cast onto the rocks can mean "bye-bye bobber".
 
lundojam
distinguished member(2605)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
01/24/2022 07:50AM  
Bring bigger bobbers and heavier weights for rough and windy conditions. A jig works fine under a slip bobber; sometimes better than a hook. Let the fish tell you.
There are lots of times when bobber fishing out-produces jigging, particularly when it's very snaggy and also in clear, shallow water or with generally boat-shy fish. Sometimes, they need that bait stationary.
Here's what I find to be the best set-up: Long rod for long casts and good hooksets (I use an 8' steelhead rod), high-vis main line for making sure all the slack is up before the hook set, flouro leader joined to main line with egg sinker above, and red hook.
 
Jackfish
Moderator
 
01/24/2022 07:51PM  
bobbernumber3: "Fresh line without curl. 6 lb should be okay.
Single weight... no double split shots.
Plain hook. Save the jigs for jigging.
No extra gear like a swivel.
Lose a hook, no problem. You have spares.
Bead below knot is optional.
Bobber about the size of a 50 cent piece.
Do not use a bait holder hook with a leech, but must have a barb.

I assumed you are fishing for walleyes. Your rig sounds small."

As one would expect with regard to the topic at hand... Bobber has it nailed... exactly.
 
HowardSprague
distinguished member(3190)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/01/2022 09:38AM  
ericinely: "In my opinion, ditch the slip bobber and bring one jigging rod. Unless you are fishing from shore, I don't believe a slip-bobber really provides any real benefit you can't achieve over jigging. It just ends up being a bunch of extra tackle, an extra rod (or lots of tying and re-tying). I spend all day out in the boat, I would rather be mobile, increase my area and speed of search and work varying depths to find the fish quicker. Even if you've found "the spot" on a lake that is just packed with fish, I still think a jig is the most effective method of fishing. Watching a bobber go down is a lot of fun, but I think feeling the tap of a fish gobbling up your jig is even more enjoyable."

On the other hand, a slip bobber gives you much greater ability to consistently hit a particular depth, once you pinpoint what's working. If you're casting to 20' water and the fish are at, say, 16', you can set it to 15-16' precisely. they move to 6-8', you can slide the knot and hit that depth accordingly and with precision. You can't cast a jig 15 yards away and set it to a 12' depth.
 
02/01/2022 05:31PM  
Jackfish: "bobbernumber3: "Fresh line without curl. 6 lb should be okay.
Single weight... no double split shots.
Plain hook. Save the jigs for jigging.
No extra gear like a swivel.
Lose a hook, no problem. You have spares.
Bead below knot is optional.
Bobber about the size of a 50 cent piece.
Do not use a bait holder hook with a leech, but must have a barb.

I assumed you are fishing for walleyes. Your rig sounds small."

As one would expect with regard to the topic at hand... Bobber has it nailed... exactly."


Thanks for the feedback Jackfish. Here is my favorite slip bobber picture showing our young paddlers having good luck from camp.
 
lindylair
distinguished member(2662)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/02/2022 07:44PM  
I possibly fish more from camp than I do from a canoe and for that a slip bobber is essential - and catches plenty of nice fish. There are times out in the canoe where you just want to chill while you are fishing and take in the surroundings and still be able to catch fish. For that a slip bobber works great. Vertical jigging, which is probably my fav way to fish, also allows for the chill factor. But actively jigging in the traditional sense requires your attention or you will lose a lot of jigs. Works great though.

I probably use a jig under my slip bobber 75% of the time and I have never noticed that it detracts from the catch. I hate split shots, rubbercor sinkers and messing with sinkers in general, the jig does that work for you. Works pretty dang good.

Generally use a 1/4 to 3/8 jig, depending on weather. If it is really windy it may require more but most of the time, less is more.
 
Hammertime
distinguished member (119)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/02/2022 09:16PM  
bobbernumber3: "Jackfish: "bobbernumber3: "Fresh line without curl. 6 lb should be okay.
Single weight... no double split shots.
Plain hook. Save the jigs for jigging.
No extra gear like a swivel.
Lose a hook, no problem. You have spares.
Bead below knot is optional.
Bobber about the size of a 50 cent piece.
Do not use a bait holder hook with a leech, but must have a barb.

I assumed you are fishing for walleyes. Your rig sounds small."

As one would expect with regard to the topic at hand... Bobber has it nailed... exactly."


Thanks for the feedback Jackfish. Here is my favorite slip bobber picture showing our young paddlers having good luck from camp. "


Nice fish!
 
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