BWCA SR Tranquility Boundary Waters Gear Forum
Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* BWCA is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Gear Forum
      SR Tranquility     
 Forum Sponsor

Author

Text

NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/04/2023 09:55PM  
I'm in the market for my first solo canoe, and a paddling shop a couple hours away has a used Souris River Tranquility for $2100. From the photos it looks in practically new condition. I haven't been able to find a ton of info on this canoe, so have any of you used it for BW tripping? I'd also likely use it occasionally on the Mississippi and its tributaries. I'm a big guy if that makes a difference - 6'3" 230.

If it is a good boat, is that a good price or should I keep looking? I'm in no rush to buy something
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
billconner
distinguished member(8624)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
01/05/2023 06:26AM  
My first solo and only till a year or so ago is a Tranquility. I love it for BWCAW and Quetico. I'm 6-1 and was around 230 till last year. An intermediate paddler. Sit, never kneel.
High initial stability - a must for me - and I find it quite quick with a double blade. Tracks very well. Was fine in white caps across Lac LaCroix. Easy to maintain - a light sanding every 3 or 4 years and a coat of spar varnish. I bought a shorter solo canoe with more rocker for the swifter streams around me in Adirondacks.

I'm quite "penurious" and $2100 seems high, though I paid $3000 for my Swift Prospector 14 Pack used though like new. I lucked out on Tranquility from an outfitter - like new except needed a new aluminum gunwale - $600. If it looks "like new" I'd think 60% of list is in the ballpark. I see $2845 on web site for basic kevlar, so maybe $1800?

Good luck!

 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/05/2023 08:16AM  
Jeez, you did luck out with your Tranquility. I've been looking for a while now and I haven't found a used kevlar canoe in any condition for less than $1,800. They just don't come up for sale very often within 3-400 miles of me. I'll see if I can haggle this seller down a bit rather than pay the full $2,100 right off the bat. That seemed a bit high to me, too
 
01/05/2023 09:22AM  
Do not worry about your weight. My son in law weighed over 450 pounds (long story) when he and daughter went with me some 10 years ago. Has lost the excess since. With him in the middle seat and bending over in near white cap conditions, we got along fine. I had called SR to see if the SR 18.5 could handle him and us with gear. The answer was to go.
 
01/05/2023 09:22AM  
Dreaded double post
 
vandolomieu
member (10)member
  
01/05/2023 03:23PM  
I bought my Tranqulity, carbon, about 8 years ago and had a Wenonah Solitude, tough weave for about 20? years before that. I have used them at least 100 trips to Sylvania and a dozen trips to Quetico. I weigh about 260. Of course the Tranq is nicer being bigger AND lighter. I would not hesitate to use either on a solo wilderness trip.
 
justpaddlin
distinguished member(548)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/05/2023 03:50PM  
My take is that the Tranquility is a stable, high volume solo. Could e a fine first solo for a big guy. It's not super efficient for a solo compared to some newer designs but folks that have them seem to like them. In my experience it's not very maneuverable so it's more suited to the BW that rivers with strong current. And Souris makes a good boat, durable and light. 2k isn't bad for a like new kevlar solo these says...even if you believe you've overpaid by $100-200 that's nothing compared to the joy you'll get out of a good solo.
 
billconner
distinguished member(8624)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
01/05/2023 06:06PM  
I'm coming around that post pandemic $2100 may be a fair price. If you just made three trips and had to sell it, I think you'd be ahead of renting, maybe just ahead.

I know the Tranq gets a rap it's not very efficient (speedy) but I found it pretty swift. I soloed with someone my age in a Magic and I had to hold back some. And more efficient generally means lower initial stability.
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/05/2023 07:17PM  
billconner: "I'm coming around that post pandemic $2100 may be a fair price. If you just made three trips and had to sell it, I think you'd be ahead of renting, maybe just ahead.


I know the Tranq gets a rap it's not very efficient (speedy) but I found it pretty swift. I soloed with someone my age in a Magic and I had to hold back some. And more efficient generally means lower initial stability."


Yeah I'm just getting into serious canoe tripping, although I've been a casual paddler since I was a kid. I thought about just renting canoes for my BW trips for a few years, which is what I did last year. But I'd rather own than rent, and if the plan is to buy eventually I might as well do it sooner than wait and spend money renting in the meantime.

I'd much rather sacrifice a bit of efficiency for extra stability, myself. I fall into the camp of "slow and steady wins the race".
 
billconner
distinguished member(8624)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
01/06/2023 06:06AM  
Don't forget to plan for a yoke if it doesn't come with one. The basic wooden one with the plastic gunwale clips and Bourquin pads and it works very well. And a double blade paddle.

The Tranq and my Swift Prospector both fit my CCS portage packs. I test paddled a few solos which did not, and would have required new packs. Just something to consider.
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/06/2023 07:09AM  
billconner: "Don't forget to plan for a yoke if it doesn't come with one. The basic wooden one with the plastic gunwale clips and Bourquin pads and it works very well. And a double blade paddle.


The Tranq and my Swift Prospector both fit my CCS portage packs. I test paddled a few solos which did not, and would have required new packs. Just something to consider."


Yeah I'm a woodworker, so I figure I can make a yoke if I can't find a commercial one that's suitable. And I already have a paddle, since I own a kayak.
 
SouthernKevlar
senior member (85)senior membersenior member
  
01/07/2023 11:32AM  
I lucked up and found my Tranquility about six years ago on Craigslist. It was listed at an embarrassingly low price as it was left behind in a divorce a few years earlier and the ex-wife, a non-paddler, wanted it gone from her shed. I bought it without paddling a Tranquility before and was happy with the handling and load capacity of the canoe. This was my first kevlar canoe and I have since done several trips to the BWCA and Adirondacks along with numerous local trips with the SR. I have increased my solo fleet since then, but the Tranquility is still a go-to canoe for many of my trips. It has enough space for my Granite Gear Traditional #4 Portage Pack behind the seat, whereas some of my narrower solo boats can only fit backpacking packs, along with a day pack up front.

The layup is also tough! I was shouldering my fifty five pound pack at a muddy portage a few years back when I slipped in the mud, caught my foot on a root and fell backward landing about three feet behind the bow. The canoe was resting on a root just under where I landed, and there was a loud crunch when I crashed and rolled off the canoe. I foresaw a duct tape patching and an end to my trip (three portages into the BWCA), but upon inspection found no crack, just some scuffing. I am impressed with toughness and flexibility of SR's Kevlar and Fiberglass layup.

I am a woodworker also. My SR came with an adjustable portage yoke, but I have made one for my Grass River Classic XL which has a very narrow gunnel width. It is not hard to do if you like wood and have a bit of time.

I wish you luck in finding your canoe!
 
ForestDuff
distinguished member (202)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/07/2023 01:42PM  
I also lucked out buying a used Tranq about a dozen or so years ago, it was only a year old and had only been on one BW trip. The previous owner had bent the gunnel in the front from I'm guessing trying to jam too big of a pack in there. So I got it for less than half of full price. I was able to slowly bend it back in place using my arms and legs. It was still pretty yellow and had yet to fade to the tiger weave brownish color.

The only other solo I have paddled was THE original cedar strip Merlin, and that was my first BW trip in a solo. So I really can't compare the Tranq to other solos, but I was looking for a solo that could hold a little more gear and take a little more abuse than others. The SR seemed to fit the bill, I actually emailed back and forth with a young man who took one trans-continental up in Canada and figured if it survived that, it surely could handle what I put it through.

It makes one or two trips a year up to the BW, but most of the time it's on the water is when I'm fishing the Twin Cities area lakes. The round thwarts make it easy to find attachments to customize it. It isn't as fast as other solos, but a gentlemen commented that he was surprised that I was able to somewhat keep up with him, we both were on solo trips last Oct when we reached a portage at around the same time. It's never felt that tippy to me, but I don't have experience in canoes that are considered tippy. 5' 10" 180#

Good luck with your search!









 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/07/2023 03:03PM  
ForestDuff: "I also lucked out buying a used Tranq about a dozen or so years ago, it was only a year old and had only been on one BW trip. The previous owner had bent the gunnel in the front from I'm guessing trying to jam too big of a pack in there. So I got it for less than half of full price. I was able to slowly bend it back in place using my arms and legs. It was still pretty yellow and had yet to fade to the tiger weave brownish color.


The only other solo I have paddled was THE original cedar strip Merlin, and that was my first BW trip in a solo. So I really can't compare the Tranq to other solos, but I was looking for a solo that could hold a little more gear and take a little more abuse than others. The SR seemed to fit the bill, I actually emailed back and forth with a young man who took one trans-continental up in Canada and figured if it survived that, it surely could handle what I put it through.


It makes one or two trips a year up to the BW, but most of the time it's on the water is when I'm fishing the Twin Cities area lakes. The round thwarts make it easy to find attachments to customize it. It isn't as fast as other solos, but a gentlemen commented that he was surprised that I was able to somewhat keep up with him, we both were on solo trips last Oct when we reached a portage at around the same time. It's never felt that tippy to me, but I don't have experience in canoes that are considered tippy. 5' 10" 180#


Good luck with your search!











"


What information I've been able to find all said the Tranquility is a tough boat. That's definitely a selling point for me. I don't abuse my gear but I also don't want a canoe I'm afraid to use in many places.

The biggest question mark I had about the Tranq was how tippy it would be. On the SR website it says that it's a tippy boat, and is best used by experienced paddlers. I've never seen a manufacturer say something like that before, which made me afraid that it would be super unstable. But none of the users here or other places have mentioned that. So maybe SR is just being extra cautious with their advice. Obviously what constitutes "tippy" is very subjective, too.
 
SouthernKevlar
senior member (85)senior membersenior member
  
01/07/2023 05:43PM  
As this was my first solo flatwater canoe, I found it to be a bit tender when I first paddled it, but was fine after the first hour or so. I previously had some whitewater canoes before and those were TIPPY! I have since picked up such narrow canoes as the GRB Classic XL and a Sawyer DY Special. Both have much less primary and secondary stability that the Tranquility. I also trip in the Classic XL.

I would not worry about the "tippyness" of the Tranquility. When you do first paddle it, carrying a bit of weight may help.
As a note, I am about 6'1" and 175 pounds.
 
billconner
distinguished member(8624)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
01/07/2023 06:32PM  
Pleasant surprise. Usually discussions of the Tranq here make ir the Rodney Dangerfield of solos. (In case that's a dated reference - no respect.)

The tranq is tippyer than their Q17. No surprise there.
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/07/2023 06:54PM  
billconner: "Pleasant surprise. Usually discussions of the Tranq here make ir the Rodney Dangerfield of solos. (In case that's a dated reference - no respect.)


The tranq is tippyer than their Q17. No surprise there."


Yeah...I missed that reference lol.
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/17/2023 05:56PM  
Update:

I bought the canoe on Saturday. It was, indeed, in almost new condition. Still bright yellow, and only a couple minor cosmetic chips in the epoxy on the bow. No scratches to speak of, even cosmetic ones. It was either hardly used at all, or owned by someone who was very careful with it. The serial number is from 1998, so it's not that new, either. Now the hard part - waiting until open water comes back to try it out!

I bought it from Carl's Paddlin in Lone Rock, WI, and I would recommend stopping in there if you happen to be in the area. Carl seemed like a great guy, and is one of the best storytellers I've ever met. He'll talk your ear off, but you won't mind.
 
billconner
distinguished member(8624)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
01/17/2023 06:04PM  
Congrats! I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoy my Tranq.

Carl's had quite a selection, including another Tranq.
 
SouthernKevlar
senior member (85)senior membersenior member
  
01/18/2023 06:22PM  
Congratulations on the new Tranquility and your first solo canoe!

When y'all's water goes back to liquid, I hope that you enjoy the way she paddles. Or it might be a good time to think about a southern vacation.
When you first launch it, you may wish to load 50 or 60 lbs. of weight in the canoe. But at 230 vs. my 180, you might just be fine as is. You will find that with it's narrower beam (compared to a Tandem) that it will feel a bit tender, but you will get used to it and come to appreciate the ease of getting the paddle from one side to the other.

I hope you enjoy that canoe as much as I do mine.
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (244)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
01/18/2023 07:26PM  
SouthernKevlar: "Congratulations on the new Tranquility and your first solo canoe!


When y'all's water goes back to liquid, I hope that you enjoy the way she paddles. Or it might be a good time to think about a southern vacation.
When you first launch it, you may wish to load 50 or 60 lbs. of weight in the canoe. But at 230 vs. my 180, you might just be fine as is. You will find that with it's narrower beam (compared to a Tandem) that it will feel a bit tender, but you will get used to it and come to appreciate the ease of getting the paddle from one side to the other.


I hope you enjoy that canoe as much as I do mine."


Good idea, I'll probably add some weight when I paddle it the first time. A narrower canoe will definitely be nice when it comes to paddling. I primarily use a double-blade paddle and I kept clipping the gunwales of the Northstar Polaris that I used in the BW last year. It was just a little too wide for comfortable paddling from the center seat, at least for me. I could widen my grip on the paddle enough to avoid it, but then it didn't feel like a natural grip position. That clunking got old quick, and I'm sure the other people on the lake thought I was a complete idiot at paddling.
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
Gear Sponsor:
Portage North