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Tomcat
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03/05/2023 11:50AM  
Do you use tent guy lines and if so do you use the factory components and installation recommendations?

I use tent guy lines when I feel conditions warrant. I often replace the factory stakes, lines and line tensioners and modify the installation recommendations to meet my personal requirements.

 
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truecyclery
member (23)member
  
03/05/2023 12:59PM  
The look and security of a taught tent is appealing to me, but only set up the guy lines if I expect rain or moderate winds or have nothing else to do around the campsite. If I recall, some of the tent manufacturer's guy line set ups are fine as is, and some seemed to flimsy and needed modification. I prefer guy line that has reflective material as well.

I learned two things while listening to the Backpacking Light podcast, first that some guy line stretches when wet, making it a lame choice for its application. Second, that guy lines needn't be guitar string tight when set up.

I've more or less moved on to the MSR groundhog tent stakes for all my tents, they never bend!
 
YetiJedi
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03/05/2023 04:17PM  
Mostly use the lines provided and as instructed, especially for the nicer model tents. I try and stake out each corner, both vestibules, and the other two ends - some require guy lines, others just stake directly to the ground. Very helpful when there is wind and rain but the airflow is also important when it is warm and muggy.

My older tents, however, need some help so I've put my own touches on the setup but nothing noteworthy.
 
Tomcat
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03/05/2023 06:11PM  
I have used a variety of stakes, cordage, line tensioners, hitches and configurations.
 
YetiJedi
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03/05/2023 07:13PM  
Tomcat: "I have used a variety of stakes, cordage, line tensioners, hitches and configurations.
"








I'm impressed! Looks prepared for just about any storm. Definitely need to up my tent line game. :)
 
iCallitMaize
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03/05/2023 08:38PM  
That Andrew Skirka guy…I think that’s his name has a good video on guy lines. Like one of the other posters, I have tried several types of cord and configurations. Think it’s a good thing to have a few shepherd hooks and tri-bladed ones for softer ground. I don’t always guy out the tent but on occasion it’s a good idea if weather could be severe.
 
scotttimm
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03/06/2023 08:32AM  
"I'm a wigwam, no I'm a teepee, no I'm a wigwam, no I'm a teepee...I can't decide, I guess I'm just two tents." - my best tent guy line

I'll be here all day folks.
 
03/06/2023 08:58AM  
If you tie your canoe, you should tie your tent. It's like wearing a seat belt, which should be standard practice.
 
chessie
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03/06/2023 09:19AM  
I always tie out tent, especially in the BW where rocky substrate can make getting stakes in the ground challenging. I'll use whatever the tent came with, and/or add light weight reflective lines (more expensive, less tripping). I usually tie in such a way I can easily snug them up, so don't care much for hardware adjusters.
 
Tomcat
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03/06/2023 11:02AM  
I have spent anxious moments in tents during high winds. I make a risk assessment and if I anticipate strong wind I utilize the terrain, guy lines and other available wind protection techniques.

When I am not anticipating strong winds I prefer to pitch my tent near the waters edge. I like the view and there tends to be fewer insects. I also prefer not to use guy lines in these conditions because I move camp often, they are a tripping hazard and water edge tent pads tend to be bedrock making it difficult and time consuming to secure guy lines.
 
03/06/2023 02:16PM  
Most all my tents have upgraded guy-lines and stakes. Cordage from 3mm to just over 1mm, in day-glow colors and adjusters. No a fan of small diameter low stretch as it's hard on old fingers. Stakes from steel barn spikes (great in gravel pits), MSR Ground Hogs, titanium spikes.
Glow in the dark 3mm cords and adjusters with loop terminations.


Fly edge pullouts often just get an extra loop of cord.

Often run 2 lines staked per guy-out point.

To me running several guy-out points to 1 stake is no better than 1 guy-out point to 1 stake probably even less secure, looks neater though!

butthead
 
Tomcat
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03/07/2023 10:09AM  
I typically replace the factory stakes, cordage and line tensioners that come with my lightweight tents and shelters.

I prefer titanium spikes for use in hard rocky ground.

I prefer ThreeBulls 1.8mm fluorescent reflective cordage for low strength guy line applications.

I prefer Curckua mini fluorescent or LifeOutdoors ultralight tensioners for use with 1.8mm guy line cordage.

I prefer the Taut-Line hitch for tensioning improvised guy line rigging.

 
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