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AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/26/2023 08:10AM  
First off, I know CCS likely offers the best most versatile tarps and I bought a CCS pioneer pack so I’m aware of the quality.

With that said, I need to save a little money on the last several items I need before the season kicks off and I came across Lite Outdoors silnylon tarps and can’t ignore them now because of the cost difference under CCS. Can’t seem to find much info on them here or elsewhere.

They use 20D fabric
16 loops in the 10x12 which also weighs only 16.9oz with the stuff sack
Cost is $129.99

 
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03/26/2023 10:27AM  
I have no experience with the company or products. If I were buying a new tarp I would lean toward a silpoly (Xenon) tarp. There are plenty of places you could get a comparable silpoly tarp. I would look at BearPaw Wilderness Designs, Dutchware Gear, or any of the major hammock gear makers. Dutch's bonded xenon tarps look really nice.
 
03/26/2023 11:31AM  
I know nothing of the company either but I see that their tarps only have one tie out for the center which would limit your setup options. Take a look at Bushcraft Outfitters. I have four of their tarps and love them. Pretty much bombproof IMO.

Bushcraft Outfitters
 
AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/26/2023 11:32AM  
boonie: "I have no experience with the company or products. If I were buying a new tarp I would lean toward a silpoly (Xenon) tarp. There are plenty of places you could get a comparable silpoly tarp. I would look at BearPaw Wilderness Designs, Dutchware Gear, or any of the major hammock gear makers. Dutch's bonded xenon tarps look really nice. "


The Dutchware tarp looks pretty awesome and at a whopping $100+ cheaper than CCS this may be the ticket. No seam sealer to deal with either.
 
mags459
senior member (51)senior membersenior member
  
03/26/2023 11:46AM  
Hammockgear.con is another one. They make a rectangle also. I have their winter style for hammock if it’s really nice. UGQ, Dutchware meanioned above are also very nice.
 
kjw
distinguished member (115)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/26/2023 01:23PM  
the prepared.com reviewed this tarp along with multiple other tarps. You can read the review. As far as seam sealing a tarp I wouldn't do it unless you are sleeping under it. I have never had any leaks. If it leaks a little and you don't like it then seal it later. If it leaks on the seams it would be minuscule. I have several CCS tarps.
Prepared tarp reviews
 
tumblehome
distinguished member(2946)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/26/2023 03:02PM  
kjw: "the prepared.com reviewed this tarp along with multiple other tarps. You can read the review. As far as seam sealing a tarp I wouldn't do it unless you are sleeping under it. I have never had any leaks. If it leaks a little and you don't like it then seal it later. If it leaks on the seams it would be minuscule. I have several CCS tarps.
Prepared tarp reviews "


The issue I have with websites that review everything and then offer a ‘check Amazon price’ button is that they are only trying to get paid with clicks.

There are a lot of sites that review everything and offer the click tab. I remember a canoe review on here last year that was the most ridiculous review of canoes ever seen. The reviewer probably had never been in a canoe. They did, however, offer plenty of ‘click here’ buttons for you to check them on Amazon.

They get something like a quarter every time you click on those buttons.
The best reviews you will ever get for outdoor gear is on this very site from people that actually use this stuff in the woods.

When I look for a review of anything whether a table saw or a pair of shoes is to read reviews of actual users.
Tom
 
kjw
distinguished member (115)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/26/2023 04:29PM  
I agree with you about reviews to a certain extent Tumblehome. In this article they say CCS was an upgrade over the other tarps. Does Dan Cooke pay them for clicks. Don't know but I have read tarp recommendations on this site and most people will recommend CCS just as the article has stated. Now the part of the article that is most useful for someone wanting to evaluate the tarps that people are recommending in this post is the table down in the middle of the article. You will need your mouse to move the table to the right side (not all columns are visible on your computer screen unless you do this). The table can move to show a lot more columns. This table does not give any ratings or opinions in it. You can take a tarp that someone recommends and look it up in the table. It has information such as type of material, number of tie outs, are tie outs reinforced, single stitching or double stitching, cloth weight, coatings on the material and much more information. It is in alphabetical order and no ratings or opinions in the table. This will help a person make an opinion on tarp selection when members reply to this post.
 
billconner
distinguished member(8625)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
03/26/2023 06:13PM  
I bought a tarp at Campmor for under $100 20 years ago and my only regret is it's still fine and I can't justify buying a CCS.
 
03/26/2023 09:38PM  
AlexanderSupertramp: "
boonie: "I have no experience with the company or products. If I were buying a new tarp I would lean toward a silpoly (Xenon) tarp. There are plenty of places you could get a comparable silpoly tarp. I would look at BearPaw Wilderness Designs, Dutchware Gear, or any of the major hammock gear makers. Dutch's bonded xenon tarps look really nice. "



The Dutchware tarp looks pretty awesome and at a whopping $100+ cheaper than CCS this may be the ticket. No seam sealer to deal with either.
"


I used a silpoly tent last fall and it really doesn't absorb moisture and stretch like my silnylon tents - never had to tighten it up. I have bought other things from Dutch and had good service. His stuff is pretty popular among hammockers. It seemed not much more $$'s and some advantages might be of interest. If you get one I'd be interested in your thoughts.
 
AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/27/2023 08:47AM  
boonie: "
AlexanderSupertramp: "
boonie: "I have no experience with the company or products. If I were buying a new tarp I would lean toward a silpoly (Xenon) tarp. There are plenty of places you could get a comparable silpoly tarp. I would look at BearPaw Wilderness Designs, Dutchware Gear, or any of the major hammock gear makers. Dutch's bonded xenon tarps look really nice. "




The Dutchware tarp looks pretty awesome and at a whopping $100+ cheaper than CCS this may be the ticket. No seam sealer to deal with either.
"



I used a silpoly tent last fall and it really doesn't absorb moisture and stretch like my silnylon tents - never had to tighten it up. I have bought other things from Dutch and had good service. His stuff is pretty popular among hammockers. It seemed not much more $$'s and some advantages might be of interest. If you get one I'd be interested in your thoughts. "


I'm gonna chew on it for a couple more weeks, need the tarp before May 23rd so I have some time still. Maybe the CCS pack will be so awesome when it gets here in a week or so that I will have no choice but to go with the Tundra tarp, but $125 savings could also pay for pretty much all my food for the first trip this year. I will report back here, seems maybe a good solid review of the Dutchware tent for BWCA folks could be in order, if I end up going that route.
 
03/27/2023 09:35AM  
If you have access to a sewing machine you could try making one. Silnylon or silpoly is about $7.50 a yard and comes typically 60 inches wide. If you can sew a flat felled seam down the middle then hem the edges and sew on some loops thats about it. I've made 3 so far (7x7, 8x8, and 10x10) and I'm about to make a 10x12 for this spring. Plenty of good YouTubes out there to help you.
 
AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/27/2023 01:28PM  
Jaywalker: "If you have access to a sewing machine you could try making one. Silnylon or silpoly is about $7.50 a yard and comes typically 60 inches wide. If you can sew a flat felled seam down the middle then hem the edges and sew on some loops thats about it. I've made 3 so far (7x7, 8x8, and 10x10) and I'm about to make a 10x12 for this spring. Plenty of good YouTubes out there to help you. "


I dont have access to one nor am I at all skilled at it, but my mother is highly skilled at sewing. She just made a dog bed for me that is top quality. I might see if I can employ her skills again for something like this. I wouldn't have it for my first trip but possibly for the rest of the trips this year.
 
03/27/2023 02:13PM  
Yes, I understand the budget constraints but that whopping extra $100 buys 33 tie out loops, 24 edge and 9 interior, full tape edging for strength, reinforced center patch with loops to secure a center pole, 80 feet of cordage. Not the least a BWCA veteran and BWCA.COM supporter. I've used several different brand tarps but none compare to the value and durability of the CCS Tundra Tarp.

butthead
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (249)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/27/2023 09:23PM  
Jaywalker: "If you have access to a sewing machine you could try making one. Silnylon or silpoly is about $7.50 a yard and comes typically 60 inches wide. If you can sew a flat felled seam down the middle then hem the edges and sew on some loops thats about it. I've made 3 so far (7x7, 8x8, and 10x10) and I'm about to make a 10x12 for this spring. Plenty of good YouTubes out there to help you. "


That's what I'm planning on doing. Just need to order the materials. I wouldn't say I'm an expert at sewing, but I'm competent, and this looks like a pretty straightforward project.
 
kjw
distinguished member (115)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/27/2023 09:49PM  
You must be canoeing instead of hiking in Boundary Waters since you ordered CCS pack. There is not that much difference in price if you order the 10 X 12 CCS in 1.9 ounce material ($162) - it will be more durable and let less UV through than getting it in 1.1 ounce. The 1.9 ounce material only weighs 2 lb 5 oz. This is not very much weight difference. It is a little over 1 pound over the tarp you are looking at. This weight difference is nothing on canoe trip. If you were on foot then I would say get the 1.1 ounce material or another tarp brand that has similar weight. If that 1 pound is critical you can make that up in some of your other gear selection. Most people have the 1.9 ounce material CCS tarp.
 
MagicPaddler
distinguished member(1492)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/28/2023 06:49AM  
The larger the tarp the more wind it will catch so it will need be stronger. Most of the tarps by hammock venders sell are smaller to cover a hammock and they usually get set up near trees that serve as a wind break so they can be thinner material. If you want a tarp to set as a dining tarp it needs to be thicker/stronger.
 
AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/28/2023 07:09AM  
kjw: "You must be canoeing instead of hiking in Boundary Waters since you ordered CCS pack. There is not that much difference in price if you order the 10 X 12 CCS in 1.9 ounce material ($162) - it will be more durable and let less UV through than getting it in 1.1 ounce. The 1.9 ounce material only weighs 2 lb 5 oz. This is not very much weight difference. It is a little over 1 pound over the tarp you are looking at. This weight difference is nothing on canoe trip. If you were on foot then I would say get the 1.1 ounce material or another tarp brand that has similar weight. If that 1 pound is critical you can make that up in some of your other gear selection. Most people have the 1.9 ounce material CCS tarp. "


I set out this year to have a gear loadout that I can single carry as I have a couple trips planned that will have significant portage miles and it just seemed like a fun challenge that might make trips more enjoyable if I can cover more ground, not to mentioned getting tangled up less in conga lines at busy portages. Had some bad experiences last year with rude people.

I also plan to use the tarp backpacking, so weight either way is definitely something I'm considering but also longevity. I've been using the Packlight app and weighing out all my gear, it's like a fun game to see how low I can go without sacrificing anything. Goal is to keep it under 40lbs so that 1lb difference is significant but I do consider the tarp an essential item.
 
EddyTurn
distinguished member (269)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/28/2023 02:59PM  
I think a choice of design very much depends on intended use. The CCS design looks weird to me. Why will one need 24 edge loops and 9 inside on 10x10 or 10x12 tarp? Who do they think I am? Also, it's disadvantageous for providing head room to have loops on the side panels positioned at seams, instead of in the center of each panel. I mostly use a tarp as a rain shelter and set it up in the A-frame configuration. My tarp has16 edge loops (usually 12 suffice) and 3 inside loops.
 
jillpine
distinguished member(911)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/28/2023 04:55PM  
Something really stuck with me the recent c-Copia. Cliff was speaking. And to his credit, he addressed head-on the eye-rolling and groaning he gets in response to some of his advice. I readily admit - I have rolled my eyes at his advice at times. Still do sometimes. But then he said this, “it’s like stepping on the brakes as you take a corner. Yeah, you can do that and make it around the corner just fine. But try it at twice the speed”.
Stopped me in my tracks.

CCS is built for twice the speed. Years and years of active use. Tundra, intense sunlight, severe storms. It won’t fail. That’s why there are the loops, seams and sealing - so it will be functional in all conditions, almost any configuration.
I own a Dutch silpoly tarp that came with a hammock set up. It’s a great hammock tarp. But it’s not CCS.
Depending on the objectives of the user, it’s money well-spent. My tarp, amortized over two decades, cost about 5$/yr.
 
kjw
distinguished member (115)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/28/2023 08:40PM  
EddyTurn: "I think a choice of design very much depends on intended use. The CCS design looks weird to me. Why will one need 24 edge loops and 9 inside on 10x10 or 10x12 tarp? Who do they think I am? Also, it's disadvantageous for providing head room to have loops on the side panels positioned at seams, instead of in the center of each panel. I mostly use a tarp as a rain shelter and set it up in the A-frame configuration. My tarp has16 edge loops (usually 12 suffice) and 3 inside loops."


For your A frame you are right and won't need all the loops. If you set up in lean to you will need a lot more tie outs. You would attach all the tie outs on one side to the ridgeline. The side that rests on the ground you would need to stake all the tie out loops. The middle pole tie out on the underside you tie a pole there to prop up your lean to for more headroom or you could run loops on top side of tarp to trees to pull it out instead and then your pole won't get in way while under tarp. If wind is blowing you will want to run line from ridgeline to ground so your tarp doesn't blow up and down with wind. To finish off your tarp you will want to run tie outs to each of the sides (usually in the middle, but if it is really windy you might need more than one on each side) to the ground. This will help keep tarp from blowing up in wind. The lean to does not blow up and down in strong winds like the A frame setup.
 
dsmith1979
member (49)member
  
03/29/2023 02:54PM  
Jaywalker: "If you have access to a sewing machine you could try making one. Silnylon or silpoly is about $7.50 a yard and comes typically 60 inches wide. If you can sew a flat felled seam down the middle then hem the edges and sew on some loops thats about it. I've made 3 so far (7x7, 8x8, and 10x10) and I'm about to make a 10x12 for this spring. Plenty of good YouTubes out there to help you. "


Great suggestion! I made a 10'x12' silpoly tarp (and double-ended stuff sack) last year that's holding up well for about $100. I think a 12'x12' would be a good future project with XL Xenon Sil for a single seam design again.

Most information came from this DIY tutorial (not a tarp but great info):
The Yet Another Flat Tarp tutorial
https://imgur.com/a/uojGYp5

My materials:
Dutchware Gear
Xenon Sil 1.1

Ripstop by the Roll:
Hex 70 (breathable)
3/4" & 1" Grosgrain
Beastee D Rings
Line Loc 3
Gutermann MARA 70 Thread

Lawson Equipment:
Reflective Glowire Cord
Guywire Accessory Cord

Amazon:
Superior Threads - Titanium-Coated Topstitch Needles #80/12-5 Count

Autozone:
Permatex Windshield & Glass Sealant 1.5oz

 
EddyTurn
distinguished member (269)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/29/2023 03:05PM  
kjw, I hear you and your narrative makes sense. A problem I see with lean-to setup in high winds is that the stronger the winds the more the chance they will change direction. And lean-to in a storm or changing wind won't provide much protection, regardless of how it's set up. The A-frame will. Of course, it's all very subjective. I mostly travel alone or in small groups and it works for me.
 
billconner
distinguished member(8625)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
  
03/29/2023 06:23PM  
Am I the only one who sets it up on diagonal? Ridge line with square tarp opposite corners - a bite on one end and a cord on other - and two opposite corners guyed out. So quick even with a non-CCS tarp.
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (249)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/29/2023 09:01PM  
dsmith1979: "
Jaywalker: "If you have access to a sewing machine you could try making one. Silnylon or silpoly is about $7.50 a yard and comes typically 60 inches wide. If you can sew a flat felled seam down the middle then hem the edges and sew on some loops thats about it. I've made 3 so far (7x7, 8x8, and 10x10) and I'm about to make a 10x12 for this spring. Plenty of good YouTubes out there to help you. "



Great suggestion! I made a 10'x12' silpoly tarp (and double-ended stuff sack) last year that's holding up well for about $100. I think a 12'x12' would be a good future project with XL Xenon Sil for a single seam design again.


Most information came from this DIY tutorial (not a tarp but great info):
The Yet Another Flat Tarp tutorial
https://imgur.com/a/uojGYp5

My materials:
Dutchware Gear
Xenon Sil 1.1


Ripstop by the Roll:
Hex 70 (breathable)
3/4" & 1" Grosgrain
Beastee D Rings
Line Loc 3
Gutermann MARA 70 Thread


Lawson Equipment:
Reflective Glowire Cord
Guywire Accessory Cord


Amazon:
Superior Threads - Titanium-Coated Topstitch Needles #80/12-5 Count


Autozone:
Permatex Windshield & Glass Sealant 1.5oz


"


Thanks for the list of supplies! I'm gonna make use of that when making mine.
 
mgraber
distinguished member(1499)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/30/2023 10:12AM  
butthead: "Yes, I understand the budget constraints but that whopping extra $100 buys 33 tie out loops, 24 edge and 9 interior, full tape edging for strength, reinforced center patch with loops to secure a center pole, 80 feet of cordage. Not the least a BWCA veteran and BWCA.COM supporter. I've used several different brand tarps but none compare to the value and durability of the CCS Tundra Tarp.


butthead"


+1 This right here, CCS is a premium product for those wanting the best. I am a hammock guy and have been camping for many years so have seen a lot of tarps, built by a lot of companies. None compare to the CCS as far as maximum strength, versatility, customer support, light weight, etc. Mine has withstood a 70mph wind that pulled a sapling out of the ground that it was tied to. I have seen them hold up to a ridiculous amount of abuse. That being said, there are many options out there that are perfectly serviceable, and of course cheaper.
 
Tomcat
distinguished member(707)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/30/2023 10:41AM  
If weight and bulk are your primary concerns you may find that a 7x10 ft tarp will provide adequate wind and rain protection. My wife and I set a 7x10 ft Aqua Quest Safari tarp in a lean configuration and comfortably sheltered from a wind and rain squall.
 
IndyCanoe
distinguished member (165)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/30/2023 01:48PM  
Haven't had a chance to use it yet but we picked up a 12' Bonded Xenon rectangle tarp with the pole mods from dutchware.com last month. Set it up in the back yard and it is awesome. We got it specifically to use with my wife's Banyan hammock, but it has us really considering a second one to use in camp. Could not believe how much head room the pole mods added to the inside even with a relatively low pitch height.

Even if you decide to make your own I would seriously consider picking up the poles from dutchware and adding the tie-outs to make the pole mod work
 
pastorjsackett
distinguished member(1215)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
03/31/2023 06:16PM  
This is a nice post and I had never heard of "theprepared.come" Oi what a rabbit hole

My wife is leaving through the weekend so I may be locked inside with this weather, just looking at that website. This is how I will look when she gets back.

 
tumblehome
distinguished member(2946)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/01/2023 06:30AM  
If saving money is the biggest issue here, Menards sells blue 10 x10 tarps for $11. Made in China. Leaves plenty of money left over to buy a sewing machine and a food dehydrator.

That reminds me, I have to pull out my CCS lifesaver tarp and get some new parachute cordage on it.
Tom
 
AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/03/2023 07:38AM  
tumblehome: "If saving money is the biggest issue here, Menards sells blue 10 x10 tarps for $11. Made in China. Leaves plenty of money left over to buy a sewing machine and a food dehydrator.
Tom"


Yes and no. At the end of the day if it was really that clear that CCS was above and beyond the best for the price point of $250, I would pull the trigger right now. The Pioneer pack just arrived last week and the quality is certainly the best I've seen in terms of carry gear, so I have no regrets with that purchase. I like to shop and learn about all options and maybe the one that checks all the boxes for me ends up being the higher priced CCS over others. But I do like to save money, who doesn't?

There have been some good mentions here that I am considering.

 
04/03/2023 11:03AM  
billconner: "Am I the only one who sets it up on diagonal? Ridge line with square tarp opposite corners - a bite on one end and a cord on other - and two opposite corners guyed out. So quick even with a non-CCS tarp. "


You're not alone, Bill. I've used the diagonal setup with a 10x10 tarp for many years, and like you appreciate the ease and simplicity. I use a 50' length of parachute cord between available trees for the diagonal with the tarp over the ridgeline. The tarp's diagonal corners are attached to the ridgeline via tautline hitches. Shorter lengths of cord secure the outer corners of the tarp to stakes, trees, or rocks as needed.

TZ

 
campnfish
distinguished member (497)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/03/2023 03:27PM  
Hammock Gear makes a rectangular 11' x 9'6" and a 12' x 9'6", 5 tie outs across each side and panel pulls on the long side. 1.1oz silpoly, both around 16-18oz in weight, price is about $150 for the larger.

I do not own one of the hammock gear tarps, i own a CCS tarp in 1.9oz and a lean to in the 1.1oz. I would rather own a 1.1oz CCS tarp, but price comes into to play for me, and my CCS tarp is a 10x14, the price was hard to beat when I purchased it from Dan, so I tolerate the extra 1lb and embrace the durability at the same time.


last year on a fall quetico trip I brought both the tarp and the lean shelter; I never used the tarp as the campsite was too small. I always bring the lean shelter because its a tarp to hang out in the rain and play cards in the dark, and we store all our gear in it as well, I may skip the tarp on this year's quetico trip in May. If I did not have a lean to, I wouldn't have a problem with bringing a 2lb 10 oz tarp.


 
YetiJedi
distinguished member(1440)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/03/2023 05:57PM  
Sheesh...I keep reading this thread and sooner or later I'll end up buying a tarp I don't need!

One question: From your first-hand experience, what is the functional difference between silnylon and silpoly? I've read the google search stuff and know the basics but I've only had experience with the silnylon.

If this is off-topic from the original post, I can certainly start a new thread.
 
NEIowapaddler
distinguished member (249)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/03/2023 09:09PM  
YetiJedi: "Sheesh...I keep reading this thread and sooner or later I'll end up buying a tarp I don't need!


One question: From your first-hand experience, what is the functional difference between silnylon and silpoly? I've read the google search stuff and know the basics but I've only had experience with the silnylon.


If this is off-topic from the original post, I can certainly start a new thread."


I'd also like to know this before I make or buy a tarp.
 
DanCooke
distinguished member(1271)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/03/2023 09:13PM  
Sil nylon is stronger, Sil Poly is weaker. Tongue Tear strength test.

Be careful of the mix of urethane and sil. It is weaker.
 
campnfish
distinguished member (497)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/03/2023 09:27PM  
I have both, I will say my silpoly tarp has been through some crazy high winds and storms, not doubting it's weaker, just throwing it out there as my experience. I will add that I always have your lean 3 with me, and it has handled the same storms without fail.
 
Tomcat
distinguished member(707)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/04/2023 04:46AM  
 
AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/04/2023 07:21AM  
campnfish: "Hammock Gear makes a rectangular 11' x 9'6" and a 12' x 9'6", 5 tie outs across each side and panel pulls on the long side. 1.1oz silpoly, both around 16-18oz in weight, price is about $150 for the larger.


I do not own one of the hammock gear tarps, i own a CCS tarp in 1.9oz and a lean to in the 1.1oz. I would rather own a 1.1oz CCS tarp, but price comes into to play for me, and my CCS tarp is a 10x14, the price was hard to beat when I purchased it from Dan, so I tolerate the extra 1lb and embrace the durability at the same time.



last year on a fall quetico trip I brought both the tarp and the lean shelter; I never used the tarp as the campsite was too small. I always bring the lean shelter because its a tarp to hang out in the rain and play cards in the dark, and we store all our gear in it as well, I may skip the tarp on this year's quetico trip in May. If I did not have a lean to, I wouldn't have a problem with bringing a 2lb 10 oz tarp.


I never really considered the larger tarps potentially being too big for the campsite, but now that has me thinking... I was going to order a 10x12, but maybe I should go with a 1.9oz CCS 10x10? Priced at $150 and only 9 oz heavier than a 10x12 1.1oz. This will almost always be just for myself on solo trips with the occasional once-per-year trip with others. Primary use being for covering cooking/sitting space.

Will I regret getting a 10x10 and not the 10x12?
 
kjw
distinguished member (115)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/04/2023 08:18AM  
10 x10 is easily good for up to 3 people. It is perfect for one or two. I have been in some pretty good storms with the 10 x 10 with another person and it kept us dry. If you would ever do a lean to setup the 10 x 12 would probably work out better. I have seen recommendations from 15 - 30 square feet per person under a tarp. I use 30 sq. ft. a person when I bring a tarp. This will keep everyone dry under the worst of conditions.
 
AlexanderSupertramp
distinguished member (391)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
  
04/04/2023 09:01AM  
kjw: "10 x10 is easily good for up to 3 people. It is perfect for one or two. I have been in some pretty good storms with the 10 x 10 with another person and it kept us dry. If you would ever do a lean to setup the 10 x 12 would probably work out better. I have seen recommendations from 15 - 30 square feet per person under a tarp. I use 30 sq. ft. a person when I bring a tarp. This will keep everyone dry under the worst of conditions."


Probably wont ever do a lean-to setup unless I use it as supplemental coverage in the winter outside a hot tent. Otherwise I always just use my tent. I could see myself using the tarp also as supplemental coverage over the tent vestibules which I haven't yet done. I have a 7x7' right now but it was some cheap amazon tarp and after last year getting rained out both trips, I know I need more. It was ok for just me if I was centered, but didn't cover enough for the dog to sprawl out next to me.
 
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