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04/16/2023 01:29PM  
Can I safely keep butane/propane canisters in a parked truck? In case of a fire ban, I want to have my canister stove and fuel available, but prefer not to take it. I'm concerned with how hot it can get in the cab or topper. Should I just stash it in the woods at the EP?
 
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04/16/2023 03:00PM  
A couple times I have left a single butane canister (full) in a cooler in a vehicle, but the vehicle was a color that doesn't get crazy hot. Both times were late summer and in a northern area.

TZ
 
OCDave
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04/16/2023 07:44PM  
I'd definitely find a place to stash the canisters. I don't know the upper limits of the canisters but it is easy math to calculate the risk of losing a canister of fuel compared to the potential cost of repairing damage related to an exploded canister.

I have zero actual knowledge to apply to the problem but... you know, Murphy's Law and such.

Good Luck
 
straighthairedcurly
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04/17/2023 07:18PM  
120 to 125 is the highest temp recommended for storing those items. Since a car in the sun on a bright summer day can reach 130-140 degrees, I don't think I would risk it.
 
Minnesotian
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04/17/2023 09:12PM  

Yes, a canister will explode in the truck if the ambient temperature exceeds the recommended range. It might not be a fireball, but the release of pressurized gas will blow out the car windows.

Instead of stashing them in the woods, you could put them under the vehicle.
 
04/18/2023 06:55AM  
Does a fire ban mean no stoves?
 
04/18/2023 07:41AM  
Blatz: "Does a fire ban mean no stoves?"


It hasn't in the past. Normally it means no campfires or fires other than stoves.
 
04/18/2023 07:49AM  
Minnesotian: "It might not be a fireball, but the release of pressurized gas will blow out the car windows. "


I'd be amazed by this. But the release of pressurized gas, if ignited, would be a mess.

Store the canisters in the back of your truck.
 
04/18/2023 02:37PM  
Blatz: "Does a fire ban mean no stoves?"


A fire ban means you can only use a gas stove with a shutoff valve. No fires, twig stoves, alcohol stoves, etc.

If you left the gas stove at home and a ban was instituted during your travels to the BW (some of us live far away), then you would not be prepared for the ban.
 
blackdawg9
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04/30/2023 06:13PM  
a friends son had a few iso butane cans rolling around in the back window of his car for most of the summer. they were swollen but never ruptured.

i would take a can or 2 with me , just as a nice to have. you can boil coffee water on the trail or have it in case of a rain out. they weigh nothing and take up almost as much space.

i was cooking some noodles the other day , in the house. even at 50 degrees, it was tough to keep lit on a cold counter top. i dont ever burn full throttle, i crack it and light it and sure if the flame didnt snuff out , without adjusting the valve. the house was just at that sweet spot of almost to cold. it was a brand new sterno can.
 
andym
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05/01/2023 01:57PM  
boonie:
If you left the gas stove at home and a ban was instituted during your travels to the BW (some of us live far away), then you would not be prepared for the ban. "


Also true if a fire ban is put in place during your trip and a ranger sees and notifies you. Whether that means carrying a gas stove as a backup depends on the length of your trip, the apparent likelihood of a ban when you enter, and your tolerance for risking not being able to cook.
 
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