Chat Rooms (0 Chatting)  |  Search  |   Login/Join
* For the benefit of the community, commercial posting is not allowed.
Boundary Waters Quetico Forum
   Group Forum: Solo Tripping
      Soloing with a Lean +     
 Forum Sponsor

Author

Text

02/19/2015 05:31PM   (Thread Older Than 3 Years)
How many people solo with a Lean shelter?

Why/why not?

Do you take a tarp too or just the Lean?
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
02/19/2015 06:03PM  
Yes, and I still will!
Just a lot of space for small weight and package.
Standing room for a short person, like me.
Nice to get into a shelter to shed outer clothing without messing up my sleeping area. Has been more that sufficient at weatherproofing my camping style. Versatile setup options, width/height and ability to set up over smaller obstacles like roots and stumps, I have even set it over a small bush.
Biggest complaint heard is the lack of an attached floor and setup complexity, neither have bothered me.
I still like a separate tarp for the fire/kitchen/relaxation area but have done without.
You probably expected these comments from me though, as an outspoken user. I do like to vary shelters just to use different stuff so I'll keep using solo tents and tarp shelters. The Lean1+ though has seen more use than others over the years I've owned it!


butthead
 
02/19/2015 06:32PM  
Lean+2 on solos for me as well. Lots of room for the weight, great view, canopy gives you a protected entrance. I use mine as a tent. I can stand up in it, I can sit on a stool inside to get dressed, etc. Lots of room for me and all my gear.

I've spent a lot of nights in mine and have never gotten wet. Only down side I can think of is that it takes awhile to set up. It is well suited for areas like the BWCA, because of the abundance of trees. I do have poles for it and usually bring them, but it isn't a necessity.

I also use a tarp. A tarp is my most versatile implement. I'll never trip without one again.

 
02/19/2015 07:54PM  

OK guys, excuse my ignorance, but how do you manage to stay dry without a floor?

I could maybe see a Lean as a tarp alternative, but I couldn't see it in lieu of a tent.

Additionally, something that would take more time to set-up and conversely take down, is the last thing I need. Despite my best efforts, I have a difficult time with efficiently breaking camp and getting on the water in a timely manner. It could also be that I just bring too much gear in general.

I've been attempting to transition towards a hammock, but I have yet to fully commit and give up the tent entirely. I still prefer my North Face Tadpole 23 for my solo endeavors.

Hans Solo

 
02/19/2015 07:58PM  
I do not own Lean because they do not have a floor. I know there are many who use and swear by them, but I do not trust myself to always be able to pitch one where the potential water on the ground issue does not become a big concern. That is more about me than the product!

 
02/19/2015 08:36PM  
I am thinking about using one (just a Lean 1+) on my late Sept solos, but am concerned about the weather from two standpoints - wind and rain. Wind presents a couple of possible problems: (1) keeping it out if it's cold so you are protected, and (2) getting it set up in strong, gusty wind since it seems like a lot of material to handle and control. Related to that is the concern about the difficulty of rigging it solo. Rain, you have to keep it from blowing in, but more problematic might be a campsite with no good place to set up that's not low lying and prone to water collection.

I do like the idea of the weight, size, and space though.

What problems occur with just using the lean and not having a tarp, or put another way, what's the advantage to having the tarp too?
 
02/19/2015 09:04PM  
Hans-

You can get floors for the Lean + that cover the ground and overlap the sod cloth of the Lean. The water will (they say & I hope) just run underneath. Some just use it as a half floor or buy the bathtubs that some tarpers use for their sleeping pads/bags.

I'm not a very efficient camp breaker either, so it's a concern. I suspect there's a learning curve to the set up and take down, and that speed and efficiency will improve with practice and technique, just like probably with the hammock. I've also wondered if that would work well for me.
 
02/19/2015 09:22PM  
Mark, I'll listen to you anytime about canoe specifics, but I'll be happy to fill ya in on the use of a Lean shelter. Canoecopia over a brew?

boonie, I'd be glad to loan ya mine for a trial. Putting it up can be done fast and sloppy, trimmed latter. Take down is last item struck and packed so that is a fast process.

butthead
 
02/20/2015 06:05AM  
Thanks, butthead-

I bought one (Lean 1+) a couple months ago and I'm going to be asking a bunch of questions to get some ideas about using it and what else I need. I'm hoping to do a 12-day trip and trying to lighten the load a little - gotta make room for the extra food and, well, I'm not as young as I used to be :)

How long a ridgeline do you guys leave on your Lean?

How much more rope and how many stakes do I need to make it solid and weatherproof?

Anything else I should know?
 
sunnybear09
distinguished member(818)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/20/2015 06:09AM  
The great appeal for me is 1)having gotten old(er), I find getting dressed and organized in a regular tent is somewhat painful and awkward, and the chance to stand up upon getting up has great appeal, and 2) now that I take an REI chair, the chance to sit up in my tent and read and ponder has great appeal. The downsides are that I really sleep better when I have a good level spot for the tent, which is often a poorly drained spot, and a tight floor makes me feel secure, and placing the tent may not be as easy with the set-up style of the Lean, which is somewhat tree-dependent. And like you and Hans, I have real pack-up issues--my packing style borders on foundering at times. That said, I am still leaning toward a Lean when I think my trips will be shorter loops with more multi-day stops to fish or explore. The problem with the every-day move is the anguish I feel when I have to just blow thru a great looking lake or terrain to keep on schedule. Options are the bane of planning!
 
02/20/2015 10:56AM  
I've spent many a rainy day/night in my Lean+ and have never gotten wet.

In regards to the packing up camp part, keep in mind that I'm closer to 70 then to 30, so I like to remain comfy.

It's quite easy to set up and take down. Upon take down, if it's not raining, I take down the Lean+ first. Dan's stuff sack works really slick and it takes very little time to pack the Lean+ itself.

But what I really like with this setup is how easy it makes packing everything else up. Once the Lean+ is packed up, the floor/tarp is still down. All my gear is sitting there on the nice clean floor. I sit on my stool and pack up everything. The floor is the last thing that goes, so everything stays nice and clean.

The packing up works great and it's one of the things I like about the use of the Lean+.

 
02/20/2015 12:06PM  
Cordage, stakes, and 12x10 tarp I normally pack. 30 to 25 ft. is the longest single piece. About a dozen stakes.
Single drop line to a spreader stick is my favorite for the back, next is to use a single line run thru back loops to "lift and separate" as the bra commercial went.
Takedown for me is opposite of AW's, packing gear under the shelter, striking the Lean last and putting on top of my pack. Nice to have a stool or my Flex chair inside for dressing and packing.

butthead

PS; Things in the yellow Coleman bag are Grip Clips. bh
 
02/20/2015 02:03PM  
I'll have to try butthead's "spreader stick."
 
barracuda
distinguished member (240)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/20/2015 10:55PM  
Like my lean1+ on duo trips, dog and I sleep in the lean, my bro sleeps in a hammock, we can hang in the lean+ if desired. For a ground tarp I found a cheap solo tent footprint that is just bigger than my sleep pad. I bring 50' of the reflective rope, 5-6 prusiks, and a variety of stakes. I always have some spare amsteel around if extensions are necessary.

Solo, I prefer my MSR hubba. Although more cramped, it is lighter, smaller, easier setup, and freestanding. I bring a small tarp and hammock to hang out in.

Bought my lean+ just last year so maybe it will grow on me with use.

 
02/21/2015 10:00AM  

quote butthead: "Mark, I'll listen to you anytime about canoe specifics, but I'll be happy to fill ya in on the use of a Lean shelter. Canoecopia over a brew? butthead "

I'll take you up on that Ken. I'm always open to anything that could improve my canoe-camping experience. I can definitely see the benefits of a Lean when tripping with my dog.

Hans Solo
 
02/21/2015 10:18PM  
quote butthead: " Cordage, stakes, and 12x10 tarp I normally pack. 30 to 25 ft. is the longest single piece. About a dozen stakes.
Single drop line to a spreader stick is my favorite for the back, next is to use a single line run thru back loops to "lift and separate" as the bra commercial went.
Takedown for me is opposite of AW's, packing gear under the shelter, striking the Lean last and putting on top of my pack. Nice to have a stool or my Flex chair inside for dressing and packing.


butthead

PS; Things in the yellow Coleman bag are Grip Clips. bh"


Wow! Is that about 300' of cordage? Maybe 15 stakes? 4 figure9 carabiners - I assume one for each corner loop of the ridge of the Lean? and 1 each for the sides? Why the figure9 carabiners instead of just figure9's - easier to attach to the loops? No prussiks? It looks like you don't always stake down every loop on the edge - do you ever find that necessary in strong wind/rain?

Really nice solid, tight looking setup. The spreader idea looks like it would really be an improvement. How do you get the lines so high on the trees for the ridgeline and the spreader? I'm a short guy :).

Oh, btw, what the grip clips for?
 
02/21/2015 10:27PM  
quote sunnybear09: "The great appeal for me is 1)having gotten old(er), I find getting dressed and organized in a regular tent is somewhat painful and awkward, and the chance to stand up upon getting up has great appeal, and 2) now that I take an REI chair,"

Say it ain't so, sunnybear! A chair! :)

Unfortunately, I ain't as young as I used to be either - only a couple years behind you. Sometimes my back just doesn't want to straighten up.
 
02/21/2015 11:20PM  
Yea about 300 ft total, in many pieces. Never used it all, plenty to rig tarp and Lean in separate locations, and hang food bag, maybe tie up visitors. I tend to take everything off the tarp and Lean except for the ridge on the Lean, so the prusiks are made as needed from small sections shown. Stakes, I take extra, may need for tarp, or extra secure Lean staking. Use what's needed. Clips make extra tieouts easy, and can be used to join tarps and or Lean together.
I'm 5 foot 6 and shrinking, yet keep a good bit of "primate" DNA. Plus a lot of patience to keep trying.

"Really nice solid, tight looking setup." thank you, I do try!

I've used it at several Wingnite camp-outs, always wind up giving tours of my setup, answering questions. Happy to share experiences!

Also have a fairly esoteric collection of tents I use.
Walrus Hurricane Hole, Mt. Hardware Stiletto being particularly hard to find.

butthead
 
02/22/2015 08:12AM  
Thanks, that's about what I figured. I'll probably have to get a little more of the line, especially if I take the tarp too. Maybe a few more stakes too. Get some niteize figure9's too. Main problem is I don't have a place here to practice set up without going on a "trip".

I'm another one of those incredible shrinking guys, but my feet are getting bigger :). They told me at the last doctor's appointment that I'm shorter than you! No way, I said, so they measured me again. Yep, I'm shorter. At least I was able to tell my wife it's true that the top shelf is farther away :).

Too bad Walrus isn't around any more.

I have a collection of cheap tents I don't use any more (and need to get rid of). And I have a bunch of more expensive tents I covet ;).
 
02/23/2015 09:31PM  
I've also been very curious about the CCS Lean and see the real advantages it could offer me (and my dog). I always find the set up as a hang up for me. Perhaps one of you veteran Lean users/enthusiast could make a short YouTube video of the process when the weather warms? It's one thing to hear it described, but I would love to see it done - end to end - without pause for explanation or editing. I'd love to watch it and judge for my self. Closest I could find was a guy who had one set up and then just explained what set up was like.
 
sunnybear09
distinguished member(818)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/24/2015 06:49AM  
quote boonie: "quote sunnybear09: "The great appeal for me is 1)having gotten old(er), I find getting dressed and organized in a regular tent is somewhat painful and awkward, and the chance to stand up upon getting up has great appeal, and 2) now that I take an REI chair,"


Say it ain't so, sunnybear! A chair! :)


Unfortunately, I ain't as young as I used to be either - only a couple years behind you. Sometimes my back just doesn't want to straighten up."


Bless me Boonie for I have chaired..my statement of contrition is as follows: Bought two chairs last summer for my 50th anniversary return to BW with my lifelong friend, thought they would facilitate comaraderie in camp. Once I had it, I found that having the chair made sitting under the tarp when raining much more comfortable and effective, ie you could center your self easily, then also discovered that rather than being confined to watching while sitting only around the fire grate I could take the chair to the most effective spot to look out on the beauty, and finally it was much more comfortable than a bumpy log. I used to take an inflatable ass-pad for log sitting, but now just use a clothing pad at fire and chair for above. And in my defense, I still have to carry it on portages, so I figure if I suffer the weight I'm entitled to the comfort. All other attempts at reducing weight are still in effect, and I am still eating absolutely as you do. So for older solos, I think the chair is defensible. I will repeat the theme song from Jeremiah Johnson five times as penance, then settle into my chair and smile! Be well, live long, and chair thyself!
 
02/24/2015 08:09AM  
I like the leans, but they seem like a lot of extra work and extra stuff for the person who is moving every day, I think if I was staying at a spot more then one day it would be nice having the extra room, I can set my tent up in less then 5 minutes, and take down even quicker.
 
02/24/2015 08:36AM  
quote Jaywalker: "I've also been very curious about the CCS Lean and see the real advantages it could offer me (and my dog). I always find the set up as a hang up for me. Perhaps one of you veteran Lean users/enthusiast could make a short YouTube video of the process when the weather warms? It's one thing to hear it described, but I would love to see it done - end to end - without pause for explanation or editing. I'd love to watch it and judge for my self. Closest I could find was a guy who had one set up and then just explained what set up was like. "

Great idea, Jaywalker! I'd love to see one, too, if anybody decides to do it. I think I'd like explanations too though. But it would be interesting to just see it done and the time for that.
 
02/24/2015 08:39AM  
I hear ya, sunnybear-

I keep putting it off, but I'll be 64 in a couple of days, so I'm probably getting closer every day. I've been sitting on rocks, logs, and my BearVault, but I'm trying a switch to Ursack to save weight. Maybe it'll be enough to add a chair :).
 
02/24/2015 08:44AM  
quote housty9: "I like the leans, but they seem like a lot of extra work and extra stuff for the person who is moving every day, I think if I was staying at a spot more then one day it would be nice having the extra room, I can set my tent up in less then 5 minutes, and take down even quicker."

I'm hoping that with a good system and some practice that set up won't really take too long, and I might not have the need to set up a separate tarp in bad weather, which would save time. I definitely need a better system for setting up my tarp.
 
IceColdGold
distinguished member(753)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
 
02/24/2015 12:16PM  
I have also looked for videos and not found much. I am looking at a Lean 2 and a tundra tarp. I have found a fair amount of info on setting up tarps and I assume all that would apply to a lean (knots and such).

I really like the idea of walking in with my shoes on, sitting on a forbidden chair (don't have one yet, maybe there is still hope for me) and taking off my shoes, or just sitting in the lean over looking the lake. That can be hard to do in a tent. I also am very interested in a larger space that is bug proof. When I buy the lean, it will double as a bug shelter when we travel with our small camper.
 
      Print Top Bottom Previous Next
Group : Solo Tripping Sponsor:
Visit Cook County